maddogdrivethru.net

Open all night
It is currently Wed Nov 20, 2019 8:17 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Forum rules


Harumpfh. English Gentlemen hardly need lectures on manners from some rabid colonial bumpkin



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Jamaican demand reparations from the British
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 7:49 pm 
Online
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 36444
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
Quote:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... tions.html

Jamaicans lead Caribbean calls for Britain to pay slavery reparations
Caribbean slave descendants, some of whose ancestors worked for David Cameron's distant family, are calling for an apology and billions of pounds in reparations


By Jon Swaine, Jamaica8:00PM GMT 15 Feb 2014 309 Comments

From his bungalow on the side of a hill in western Jamaica, Willie Thompson surveys the same lush valley that one of his great-great-grandmothers was forced to harvest for sugar cane more than 180 years ago.

“I am an African descendant,” he said, whippet-thin and grizzled at the age of 78. “She came here with the chains on her feet, on a slave trade ship”.

Mr Thompson knows that when Parliament voted in 1833 to abolish slavery in Britain’s colonies, Earl Grey’s government was made to pay out compensation worth almost £2 billion in today’s money.

And after an exhausting day spent scratching out a living by farming yams, he wonders what might have been if Nana Bracket and her comrades, rather than the ancestor of David Cameron who owned them, had received £4,101 of it - the equivalent of £415,000 today.

“The English made a lot of money back then. A lot of money,” he said, with a sigh almost long enough to reach Dudley, West Mids, where he worked as a labourer in the 1960s before returning home. “I think it is fair for we to get a bit of compensation for what all our people been through.”

A coalition of 14 Caribbean states, including Jamaica, agrees with Mr Thompson, and is now mounting the first united campaign for reparations from Britain over its role in the Atlantic slave trade.

The group is ready to sue in the courts and has hired Leigh Day, the London law firm that last year won £20 million for Kenyans tortured by the British during the Mau Mau rebellion of the 1950s.

This month it will unveil a list of 10 demands for Britain, France and Holland, including funds likely to total billions, an apology, and assurances slavery will never be repeated, The Telegraph can disclose.

Professor Verene Shepherd, the chairman of Jamaica’s reparations committee, said British colonisers had “disfigured the Caribbean,” and that their descendants must now pay to repair the damage.

“If you commit a crime against humanity, you are bound to make amends,” Prof Shepherd told The Telegraph. “The planters were given compensation, but not one cent went to the freed Jamaicans”.

From the mid-18th century, British merchants shipped more than three million people from west Africa to the Americas, taking the lead in an Atlantic slave trade pioneered by the Dutch and Portuguese.

About £4 trillion was extracted from the region in unpaid labour alone, according to researchers at the University of Birmingham, and the vast profits went to financing the construction of modern Britain.

The Grange sugar estate that later became Mr Thompson’s village was a golden goose for its part-owner General Sir James Duff, an MP for Banffshire and Mr Cameron’s first cousin six times removed.

Some 202 people, who had been bought like livestock for up to £300, remained in bondage there by the time of abolition, forced to rise at dawn and work days of back-breaking labour for the privilege.

Meanwhile wealthy plantation owners from the surrounding parish of Hanover, named after the reigning British line, would travel to its biggest city of Lucea to enjoy cock-fighting bouts and shows by visiting comedians from America.
Fabian, a 16-year-old boy living in Grange (JON SWAINE)

These days, 344 people share the tumbledown shacks of Grange, formed from the old estate in the 1920s. The village does not appear on Google Maps, and its existence was news to the parish librarian.

Homes scatter around a hardware shop, a grocery stand and a cupboard-sized bar, where residents can enjoy a Red Stripe after days cleaning rooms or serving meals to tourists in Negril, the closest city.

A small medical centre built with US aid money tends to the ill. At this time of year, torrential rains last for much of the afternoon, which is apparently preferable to the stagnant, mosquito-ridden summers.

Tony Walker, Grange’s energetic councillor, said it struggled even relative to the rest of a country where output per person is £3,352 per year - one seventh of Britain’s - and the minimum wage is 86p an hour.

“We do not have sufficient social services,” he said. “We need a community centre.” He stressed that he was, however, on the way to fulfilling an election campaign pledge to secure rubbish collections.

No longer “sugar cane-dependent,” a few village residents still work in the industry, he said, centring on a former Tate & Lyle factory in nearby Frome now owned, aptly, by the Chinese government.

Yet there are still descendents of freed slaves in the area “who hardly manage to really do anything,” said Mr Walker, who urged Mr Cameron to use his position to “fast-track” some kind of compensation.

The Government has said little since Tony Blair’s 2007 statement of “deep sorrow and regret” for the “unbearable suffering” caused by the slave trade, when he seemed to carefully stop short of an apology.

William Hague, the Foreign Secretary, described the trade as “brutal, mercenary and inhumane from its beginning to its end” in his 2008 biography of William Wilberforce, the great abolitionist MP.

He pointed to The Zong massacre of 1781, in which the captain of a Liverpool-owned ship that ran out of drinking water threw at least 132 slaves overboard, in an attempt to claim insurance for lost cargo.

Mark Simmonds, Mr Hague’s minister with responsibility for the Caribbean, said during a visit to Jamaica in November that “slavery was abhorrent” - but dismissed all talk of reparations.

“Do I think that we are in a position where we can financially offer compensation for an event two, three, four hundred years ago? No, I don’t,” said Mr Simmonds at a press conference.

Indeed, some international law experts have dismissed the threat of a pan-Caribbean lawsuit as nonsense, arguing that regardless of its evils, the slave trade was legal under British law at the time.

Yet campaigners - including Lord Gifford, a British hereditary peer and barrister who runs a law firm in Kingston and advises the reparations committee - remain unbowed, saying that the slave trade “breached the natural law that man is free”.
“There is no statute of limitations on a crime against humanity,” Lord Gifford, who defended members of the Guildford Four and Birmingham Six, told The Telegraph. “The claim is soundly based in law.”

Martyn Day, the senior partner at Leigh Day, has said a case could start next year at the International Court of Justice in The Hague. Unlike with the Mau Mau, however, there would be no living witnesses.

In support, Prof Shepherd and her colleagues argue that slavery is to blame for a litany of modern ills across the Caribbean, extending to epidemics of diabetes and hypertension allegedly rooted in the salty diets that were forced on the ancestors of sufferers.

In 1962, they stress, Britain left an independent Jamaica in which 80 per cent of the people were functionally illiterate. Male literacy remains more than four points below the international average.



Continued at above link due to length

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Jamaican demand reparations from the British
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 8:16 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2011 3:06 pm
Posts: 15581
Location: inside your worst nightmare
Reputation points: 18687
Waitaminute . . . didn't Great Britain already go bankrupt and get overrun by covert Jamaican operatives a couple years ago?



Which actually seems to have been more or less just a rehash of a pre-existing conflict


_________________
Anthro's NSFW Thread


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Jamaican demand reparations from the British
PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 9:29 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major

Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 7:44 am
Posts: 12099
Reputation points: 19050
No good deed goes unpunished?

_________________
“The gap in EU finances arising from the United Kingdom’s withdrawal and from the financing needs of new priorities need to be clearly acknowledged.” - Mario Monti


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Jamaican demand reparations from the British
PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 1:58 am 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2011 3:06 pm
Posts: 15581
Location: inside your worst nightmare
Reputation points: 18687
I personally do NOT owe anyone who is brown anything.

I did have some very good dental work done by this delightful African Alabaman-American dentist some 15 years ago, but he was paid in full.

_________________
Anthro's NSFW Thread


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Jamaican demand reparations from the British
PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2014 8:04 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 12416
Reputation points: 17177
Wait ... I bet ... my great, great, great, ... (a google of greats) grandaddy got kicked out of Africa by Africans and lived a life of hardship because of it.

The Africans owe ME reparations by gosh!

_________________
Ugum Bugum Uber Alles - Iddi Ut Amine Dada !!


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Jamaican demand reparations from the British
PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:10 pm 
Online
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 36444
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
New developments on this subject:

Quote:
http://news.yahoo.com/caribbean-nations ... 47413.html

Caribbean nations consider push for slavery reparations
Reuters By Aileen Torres 20 hours ago
By Aileen Torres

KINGSTON (Reuters) - More than 150 years after European colonial powers abolished slavery, a coalition of Caribbean nations is considering legal action to seek a formal apology and monetary compensation.

Caribbean leaders meeting next week in St. Vincent are expected to study a broad legal outline for the reparations claim prepared by a British law firm.

The subject of reparations has simmered in the Caribbean for many years and opinions are divided. Some see reparations as delayed justice, while others see it as an empty claim and a distraction from modern social problems in Caribbean societies.

Slavery ended throughout the Caribbean in the 1800s in the wake of slave revolts, and left many of the region's plantation economies in tatters.

If the leaders decide to go ahead, a legal complaint will be filed against European states, possibly opening the way for formal negotiations.

The European states targeted are Britain, France, Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and Denmark.

"Undoubtedly, Britain faces more claims than anyone else because it was the primary slave power and colonial power in the Caribbean," Martyn Day, the British lawyer advising the Caribbean nations, said in an interview. "Britain will be very much at the forefront."

Britain's government is aware of the proposed legal action, its foreign office said.

"Slavery was and is abhorrent. The United Kingdom unreservedly condemns slavery and is committed to eliminating it," a spokesperson said, adding that reparations are not the answer. "Instead, we should concentrate on identifying ways forward with a focus on the shared global challenges that face our countries in the 21st century."

Legal experts say the lawsuit would be a long shot at best.

"There is no legal basis for a claim for reparations," Robert A. Sedler, a professor at Wayne State University Law School, said.

"Slavery was legal at the time, and international law was not a part of the law of the European states. Moreover, a long period of time has passed, and all the victims of slavery are long dead," he added.

Some reparations cases have popped up in the United States over the last decade, but no one has been awarded compensation.

However, if negotiations open "the European nations might decide to apologize for slavery and to provide some financial assistance to the Caribbean nations," Sedler said.

For instance, Caricom could seek to work with the European states to set up museums for Caribbean culture and history, which would entail decisions on financing, Day said.

The legal strategy rests on the fact that the European states targeted by Caricom have all signed the International Convention on the Elimination of All Racial Discrimination, which makes it "a duty to do all in their power to eradicate racial discrimination," said Day.

The Caribbean effort is being led by Ralph Gonsalves, prime minister of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, who has doggedly pursued the issue for the last four years.

PRECEDENT?

When Gonsalves found out last year that London's High Court ordered the British government to pay compensation to survivors of Kenya's Mau Mau uprising, he contacted Day, whose law firm Leigh Day, represented the Mau Mau.

The British government paid £19.9 million ($33 million) to 5,228 survivors of torture during Kenya's 1950s Mau Mau uprising, and formally acknowledged that "Kenyans were subject to torture and other forms of ill treatment and that these abuses took place and that they marred Kenya's progress towards independence."

Gonsalves said slavery so traumatized society in Caribbean countries that they have still not fully recovered.

The reparations claim takes into account what its authors say are slavery-related chronic diseases such as hypertension and Type 2 diabetes, widespread illiteracy, the lack of museums and research centers for Caribbean history, the lack of respect for African culture and identity, continuing psychological effects of centuries of slavery, and the lack of scientific and technical know-how to compete in the global economy.

In December 2013, the Caricom Reparations Commission decided on six factors for the claim: public health, education, cultural institutions, cultural deprivation, psychological trauma, and scientific and technological backwardness.

Estimates vary as to how many were enslaved. According to the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, the British Caribbean had 2.3 million slaves, the French Caribbean had 1.1 million, the Spanish Americas had 1.3 million and the Dutch Americas had about 445,000.

Slaves labored mainly in sugar and coffee plantations and were forced to work around the clock in the fields during harvest, according to Kathleen Monteith, head of the History and Archeology Department at the University of the West Indies.

The international convention against discrimination says significant attempts should be made to solve matters amicably but if no resolution is reached the Caribbean nations can take their case to the International Court of Justice.

Day hopes to present formal complaints to the European states at the end of June. If a European state were to refuse a Caribbean nation's request for talks on its particular claims, then a formal legal complaint would be made.

"The Western powers will at least give a sympathetic ear," he said. "The knee-jerk reaction will be to say no (but) Western powers will want to be seen as dealing sensitively with this."

(Editing by David Adams, Kieran Murray and Richard Chang)




Wulfir....LaPalice...JDR Dragoon...they are coming after your countries as well now.

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Jamaican demand reparations from the British
PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:24 pm 
Offline
Sergeant

Joined: Thu Sep 18, 2008 4:31 am
Posts: 1063
Location: Copenhagen
Reputation points: 1353
Good luck with that. The only colony we had in the Caribbean was the Virgin islands. Who are currently a territory of the United States ;-)

The ones in Ghana and India are another matter...

_________________
Per Disciplinam meam Lucem videbis.

JDR was the worst abomination that I have ever come into contact with on the 'Net,
and I have been around for a little while on at least one other insignificant board
-Stephanie Armadillo. Internet Tough Guy.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Jamaican demand reparations from the British
PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 6:48 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major

Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 7:44 am
Posts: 12099
Reputation points: 19050
They can fuck off. Not sure why they think they are entitled to any money of mine.

The search for compo, relentless these days.

_________________
“The gap in EU finances arising from the United Kingdom’s withdrawal and from the financing needs of new priorities need to be clearly acknowledged.” - Mario Monti


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Jamaican demand reparations from the British
PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 7:21 pm 
Offline
Oppressive Tyrant and Enemy of Truth
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 6:06 pm
Posts: 15507
Location: under the porch
Reputation points: 16843
Why stop with Jamaicans? Hasn't every brown skinned person in the world been a victim of Yuropean imperialism? Shouldn't they all have council housing and a benefit check? As long as even one oppressed goes with out being paid, the legacy of racism continues.

_________________
First, we must kill moose and squirrel


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Jamaican demand reparations from the British
PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 6:16 pm 
Online
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 36444
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
And now The Indian Prime Minister is also calling for reparations from their former overlords:

Quote:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... -rule.html


India's prime minister endorses call for Britain to pay reparations for colonial rule
Narendra Modi supports impassioned Shashi Tharoor’s call for colonial ruler Britain to make reparations to India

By Barney Henderson
9:43PM BST 24 Jul 2015

India’s prime minister has praised an opposition MP who made an impassioned appeal for Britain to pay reparations for 200 years of colonial rule.

Narendra Modi said Shashi Tharoor’s speech at the Oxford Union, which was posted online last week, “reflected the feelings of patriotic Indians” and that he said “the right things at the right place”.

[video at above link]

Mr Tharoor, a Congress MP, writer and former UN under-secretary general, said that “Britain’s rise for 200 years was financed by its depredations in India”

“We paid for our own oppression,” he said “It’s a bit rich to impress, maim, kill, torture and repress and then celebrate democracy at the end of it.”

“India's share of the world economy when Britain arrived on its shores was 23 per cent. By the time the British left it was down to below four per cent," Tharoor said in the May 28 debate.
"Why? Simply because India had been governed for the benefit of Britain.”

Indians had "literally paid for our own oppression," as by the end of the 19th century they were the world's biggest purchasers of British goods as well as providing employment for highly paid civil servants.

“In fact, Britain’s industrial revolution was actually premised upon the de-industrialisation of India,” he said.

The 15-minute speech has been viewed more than 1.5 million times on YouTube and was widely praised by the Indian press.

Mr Modi responded to the speech earlier this week, saying: "Tharoor's speech reflected the feelings of patriotic Indians on the issue and showed what impression one can leave with effective arguments by saying the right things at the right place."

Mr Tharoor, who has often been criticised by Congress president Sonia Gandhi for praising Mr Modi and his initiatives, also called on Britain to apologise for colonial rule.

concerned, the ability to acknowledge a wrong that has been done, to simply say sorry, will go a far, far, far longer way than some percentage of GDP in the form of aid," he said.
"What is required, it seems to me, is accepting the principle that reparations are owed."
Mr Modi, however, did not say whether he backed Mr Tharoor's demand for an apology. The British High Commission in Delhi declined to comment.

Mr Modi is due to visit Britain later this year. The dates of the trip have yet to be finalised.
Many in India want Britain to make amends for the wrongs committed during its colonial rule.
David Cameron had to face severe criticism during his last trip to India for not apologising for the 1919 Jallianwala Bagh massacre in Amritsar, where hundreds of non-violent pro-independence protesters were shot dead at the behest of Colonel Reginald Dyer.
The Prime Minister expressed regret for the massacre during a visit to Amritsar in 2013 and laid a wreath at a memorial, but Indian critics said it was not enough.


_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group