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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2019
PostPosted: Tue Sep 24, 2019 2:49 pm 
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RIP Nog. :(

DS-9 was such a comfy show and Major Kira's jugs were always a nice bonus.

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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2019
PostPosted: Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:04 am 
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Cream drummer Ginger Baker dies aged 80...

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Ginger Baker, the legendary drummer and co-founder of rock band Cream, has died at the age of 80.

Last month, the musician's family announced he was critically ill in hospital, but no further details of his illness were disclosed.

On Sunday morning, a tweet on his official Twitter account stated: "We are very sad to say that Ginger has passed away peacefully in hospital this morning. Thank you to everyone for your kind words over the past weeks."

Baker has suffered from a number of health issues in recent years. He underwent open heart surgery in 2016 and was forced to cancel a tour with his band Air Force after being diagnosed with “serious heart problems”.

The drummer co-founded Cream in 1966 with Eric Clapton and Jack Bruce. The band released four albums before splitting in 1968, after which he formed the short-lived band Blind Faith with Clapton, Steve Winwood and Ric Grech.

Baker launched the band Air Force in 1970 and has released a number of solo albums, including his most recent, Why?, in 2014.

He was named number three on Rolling Stones’ 100 Greatest Drummers of All Time, and is the subject of the documentary Beware of Mr Baker.

https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-ente ... 44786.html

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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2019
PostPosted: Sun Oct 06, 2019 9:31 pm 
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Ah fuck . . . he was one of my favs . . . Check out how wildly fucked up he is in this set!

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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2019
PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2019 2:26 pm 
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Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov, who became the first man to walk in space in 1965, dies aged 85.

Quote:
Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov, who became the first person in history to spacewalk in 1965, has died aged 85.

Tethered to a spaceship by a 4.8m (16ft) cable, the Russian floated above Earth for 12 minutes.

"You just can't comprehend it. Only out there can you feel the greatness - the huge size of all that surrounds us," Leonov told the BBC in 2014.

But the outing nearly ended in disaster as his spacesuit inflated and he struggled to get back in the spaceship.

At a time when the US and the USSR were jostling for space supremacy, Leonov's mission was lauded as a triumph at home.

But Leonov's ambitions did not stop at his spacewalk. He went on to become the commander of Soyuz-Apollo, the first ever joint US-Soviet mission in 1975.

Leonov died at Moscow's Burdenko hospital on Friday after a long illness, his assistant confirmed.

Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko said Leonov's death was a "loss for the whole planet", while President Vladimir Putin said he admired the astronaut's courage.

Leonov was born in Siberia, his father a victim of Stalinist repression. His family moved to Kaliningrad in western Russia in 1948.

As an air force pilot he was selected to train as a cosmonaut in 1960. He trained with Yuri Gagarin, the first human in space, and they became close friends.

Leonov described his sortie into outer space in numerous media interviews.

"It was so quiet I could even hear my heart beat," he told the Observer. "I was surrounded by stars and was floating without much control. I will never forget the moment. I also felt an incredible sense of responsibility. Of course, I did not know that I was about to experience the most difficult moments of my life - getting back into the capsule."

In the vacuum of outer space, his spacesuit began to balloon out of shape and its fabric began to stiffen dangerously.

His hands slipped out of his gloves, his feet came out of his boots, and Leonov could no longer get through his spaceship's airlock. Even worse, the craft was hurtling towards Earth's shadow. In five minutes, the cosmonaut realised he would be plunged into total darkness.

He managed to release some of the oxygen from his spacesuit and was barely able to squeeze himself back into the capsule headfirst. He lost 6kg (13 pounds) in the process.

He and his pilot Pavel Belyayev were hailed as heroes on their return, but only after crash-landing in a forest in the Ural mountains and waiting three days to be rescued.

A decade later, Leonov was one of two Soviet cosmonauts involved in the first docking of US and Soviet spaceships - the Apollo 18 and Soyuz 19 - during a period of detente between the two countries.

He was twice awarded the country's top medal, Hero of the Soviet Union.

Although Leonov was best-known for his exploits as an astronaut, his artwork also garnered accolades throughout his life.

A self-taught artist, Leonov was adept at drawing in zero gravity. It was during the space-walking mission of 1965 that Leonov created the first artwork in space.

In the artwork, Leonov depicted a small yet remarkable sunrise from the vantage point of the Voskhod 2 spacecraft.

London's Science Museum exhibited Leonov's coloured pencil drawing as part of a major exhibition on cosmonauts in 2015.

"You can imagine it being a bit of a nightmare … but he wanted to stop the time and share this moment with other people," curator of the exhibition Natalia Sidlina said.

Leonov's artworks drew heavily on his experiences in space. His other notable artworks included a self-portrait of his 1965 spacewalk, sketches of fellow astronauts and landscapes in the former Soviet Union.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-50017409

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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2019
PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2019 2:50 pm 
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RIP comrade.

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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2019
PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 3:48 pm 
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I don't know if he was ever known in the States but the brilliantly funny Australian broadcaster Clive James has passed away at age 80...

Quote:
Clive James, the Australian writer and broadcaster known around the world for his dry wit, has died at the age of 80.

Diagnosed with leukaemia in 2010, the author and critic had movingly written about his terminal illness during the final years of his life.

Born Vivian James in 1939, he moved to England in 1961 and rose to prominence as a literary critic and TV columnist.

He went on to deliver wry commentary on international programming in such shows as Clive James On Television.

The show saw him introduce amusing and off-beat TV clips from around the world, most famously from Japanese game show Endurance.

According to a statement from his agents, he died at home in Cambridge on Sunday. A private funeral was held on Wednesday in the chapel at Pembroke College.

"Clive died almost 10 years after his first terminal diagnosis, and one month after he laid down his pen for the last time," the statement read.

He endured his ever-multiplying illnesses with patience and good humour, knowing until the last moment that he had experienced more than his fair share of this 'great, good world'.

"He was grateful to the staff at Addenbrooke's Hospital [in Cambridge] for their care and kindness, which unexpectedly allowed him so much extra time.

"His family would like to thank the nurses of the Arthur Rank Hospice at Home team for their help in his last days, which allowed him to die peacefully and at home, surrounded by his family and his books."

Singer Alison Moyet was among many to pay tribute to a man she described as a "bright, beaming boy".

Ex-tabloid editor Piers Morgan remembered him as "a brilliantly funny man", while presenter Gaby Roslin said he had been "incredibly kind".

"We were lucky to have him for so long after his diagnosis," wrote actor Samuel West. "We were lucky to have him at all."

Reverend Richard Coles said he was "the best telly critic that ever there was", while Margarita Pracatan - the Cuban singer James helped make a household name - paid tribute to his "intelligence... talent and beautiful way of living".

Tony Hall, the BBC's director general, said the "irreplaceable" James was "a clever, witty and thought-provoking broadcaster".

"He had a huge range of talents and everything he did was essential listening or viewing," Lord Hall continued.

James was renowned for his pithy turns of phrase. He once likened Arnold Schwarzenegger to "a brown condom full of walnuts" and said motor racing commentator Murray Walker sounded "like a man whose trousers are on fire".

He was equally waspish when describing Dame Barbara Cartland, whose eyes he said "looked like the corpses of two small crows that had crashed into a chalk cliff".

"Common sense and a sense of humour are the same thing, moving at different speeds," was another of his famous quotes.

He also had advice for his future obituarists, telling them "shorter is better, and that a single line is best".

"Any encounter with James, either in print or in person, left you desperate to go and open a book, watch a film or a TV show, or hunt down a recording," said Don Paterson, poetry editor at James's publisher Picador.

"With Clive's passing we lose the wisest and funniest of writers, a loyal and kind friend, and the most finely-stocked mind we will ever have the fortune to encounter."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-50578512

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I could be an inmate in a long-term institution
I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die
I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by
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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2019
PostPosted: Wed Nov 27, 2019 8:23 pm 
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Mac wrote:
Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov, who became the first man to walk in space in 1965, dies aged 85.

Quote:
Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov, who became the first person in history to spacewalk in 1965, has died aged 85.

Tethered to a spaceship by a 4.8m (16ft) cable, the Russian floated above Earth for 12 minutes.

"You just can't comprehend it. Only out there can you feel the greatness - the huge size of all that surrounds us," Leonov told the BBC in 2014.

But the outing nearly ended in disaster as his spacesuit inflated and he struggled to get back in the spaceship.

At a time when the US and the USSR were jostling for space supremacy, Leonov's mission was lauded as a triumph at home.

But Leonov's ambitions did not stop at his spacewalk. He went on to become the commander of Soyuz-Apollo, the first ever joint US-Soviet mission in 1975.

Leonov died at Moscow's Burdenko hospital on Friday after a long illness, his assistant confirmed.

Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko said Leonov's death was a "loss for the whole planet", while President Vladimir Putin said he admired the astronaut's courage.

Leonov was born in Siberia, his father a victim of Stalinist repression. His family moved to Kaliningrad in western Russia in 1948.

As an air force pilot he was selected to train as a cosmonaut in 1960. He trained with Yuri Gagarin, the first human in space, and they became close friends.

Leonov described his sortie into outer space in numerous media interviews.

"It was so quiet I could even hear my heart beat," he told the Observer. "I was surrounded by stars and was floating without much control. I will never forget the moment. I also felt an incredible sense of responsibility. Of course, I did not know that I was about to experience the most difficult moments of my life - getting back into the capsule."

In the vacuum of outer space, his spacesuit began to balloon out of shape and its fabric began to stiffen dangerously.

His hands slipped out of his gloves, his feet came out of his boots, and Leonov could no longer get through his spaceship's airlock. Even worse, the craft was hurtling towards Earth's shadow. In five minutes, the cosmonaut realised he would be plunged into total darkness.

He managed to release some of the oxygen from his spacesuit and was barely able to squeeze himself back into the capsule headfirst. He lost 6kg (13 pounds) in the process.

He and his pilot Pavel Belyayev were hailed as heroes on their return, but only after crash-landing in a forest in the Ural mountains and waiting three days to be rescued.

A decade later, Leonov was one of two Soviet cosmonauts involved in the first docking of US and Soviet spaceships - the Apollo 18 and Soyuz 19 - during a period of detente between the two countries.

He was twice awarded the country's top medal, Hero of the Soviet Union.

Although Leonov was best-known for his exploits as an astronaut, his artwork also garnered accolades throughout his life.

A self-taught artist, Leonov was adept at drawing in zero gravity. It was during the space-walking mission of 1965 that Leonov created the first artwork in space.

In the artwork, Leonov depicted a small yet remarkable sunrise from the vantage point of the Voskhod 2 spacecraft.

London's Science Museum exhibited Leonov's coloured pencil drawing as part of a major exhibition on cosmonauts in 2015.

"You can imagine it being a bit of a nightmare … but he wanted to stop the time and share this moment with other people," curator of the exhibition Natalia Sidlina said.

Leonov's artworks drew heavily on his experiences in space. His other notable artworks included a self-portrait of his 1965 spacewalk, sketches of fellow astronauts and landscapes in the former Soviet Union.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-50017409


Man, that is some brass balls.

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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2019
PostPosted: Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:15 am 
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Mental As Anything frontman Andrew "Greedy" Smith dies aged 63. Popular in Australia in the 80's the band had a worldwide hit when their song Live It Up featured in the movie Crocodile Dundee...

Quote:
Mental As Anything founding member and songwriter Andrew "Greedy" Smith has died after suffering a heart attack in his car. He was aged 63.

The band confirmed Smith's death on its Facebook page "with an incredibly heavy heart".

"Our grief and confusion at this time are little compared to what Andrew's family will be feeling," they added.

According to Australian media, Smith was moving into a new home with his fiancee Fiona Docker when he fell ill.

An ambulance attended the scene, but attempts to revive him failed.

The singer, songwriter and keyboardist was currently on a tour with Mental As Anything, and was the last original member still performing with the band.

Affectionately known as "The Mentals", they were one of Australia's most popular bands in the 1980s, scoring hits with songs like Too Many Times, If You Leave Me, Can I Come Too? and The Nips Are Getting Bigger.

They scored a UK hit in 1987 after their single Live It Up featured in the soundtrack to Crocodile Dundee.

Formed as a party covers band in 1978, Smith always maintained their success had been a fluke.

"We didn't have any ambition at all!" he told NQ Music Press in 2014. "It was someone else's idea to record us, they started an independent record company and they needed someone to record and they picked us, and it was just luck and everyone liking The Nips Are Getting Bigger that started it all off.

"So we said, 'this is easy! We weren't even trying!'"

The band were inducted into the Australian Recording Industry Association Hall of Fame in 2009. Last month, Smith was added to the Australian Songwriters Hall of Fame.

Outside music, the gregarious, articulate frontman was a well-loved TV personality, appearing on Australian shows like Hey Hey It's Saturday and Tonight Live.

He played his last show with Mental As Anything on Saturday night, and had been scheduled to perform in Melbourne on Thursday.

One of the band's founding members, Reg Mombassa, said the group was in shock that their friend had died so suddenly.

"We are all totally shocked. He seemed like such a healthy, energetic guy," he said.

"He wasn't the kind of guy who partied too hard. He enjoyed a drink when we were younger but he was a very serious performer."

Smith is survived by his son Harvey, fiancee Fiona Docker and brother Stuart.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-50642135



_________________
I could be the catalyst that sparks the revolution
I could be an inmate in a long-term institution
I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die
I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by
What a waste...


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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2019
PostPosted: Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:22 pm 
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Les Rutherford who escaped Dunkirk on a shed door dies ages 101...

Quote:
A veteran who escaped Dunkirk by paddling out to sea on a shed door has died at the age of 101.

Les Rutherford became trapped while fighting a rear-guard action during the evacuation of the port.

He and a fellow soldier used the door, which had been blown off a shed, to escape out to sea, where they were picked up by a French trawler.

Tributes paid to Mr Rutherford described him as "a wonderful man who will be sorely missed".

Talking previously about his exploits in Dunkirk, Mr Rutherford said: "The place was being bombed to bits.

"There was absolutely no hope, so another chap and I decided to take this big door which had been blown off a shed and we put out to sea."

After being picked up, he said he was given a glass of rum and returned to England wearing only a blanket and socks.

He later joined Bomber Command and served as a bomb aimer in the RAF.

His role was to lie flat in the nose of the aircraft, directing the pilot during a bombing-run as the bombs were released.

During a raid over Germany in December 1943, Mr Rutherford was shot down and captured.

He was taken to Stalag Luft III shortly before the Great Escape took place in March 1944, although he was not part of it.

Whilst there, he exchanged chocolate for a notebook which he used to record life in the camp.

At the end of the war he was repatriated to the UK.

Paying tribute, a spokesperson for the International Bomber Command Centre, said: "If ever a man served his country to the highest standards it was Les.

"Blue skies Les, forever in our hearts."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-l ... e-50645045


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I could be the catalyst that sparks the revolution
I could be an inmate in a long-term institution
I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die
I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by
What a waste...


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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2019
PostPosted: Sun Dec 08, 2019 6:54 pm 
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René Auberjonois who played Odo in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine dies aged 79...

Quote:
René Auberjonois, best known for his roles in “Boston Legal” and “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,” died at his home in Los Angeles due to metastatic lung cancer. He was 79.

His son Rèmy-Luc confirmed the news to the Associated Press.

Auberjonois was a prolific television actor, appearing as Paul Lewiston in 71 episodes of “Boston Legal” and as Clayton Runnymede Endicott III in ABC’s long-running sitcom “Benson.” He played Odo in “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,” and carried that role into video games, voicing the same role in “Harbinger” and “The Fallen.”

He appeared in the movie “MASH” as Father Mulcahy in the first of several collaborations with Robert Altman. Other film credits include Roy Balgey in 1976’s “King Kong” and Reverend Oliver in “The Patriot,” as well as parts in “McCabe & Mrs. Miller,” “Eyes of Laura Mars” and “Walker.”

Before his entry into Hollywood, Auberjonois worked in theater, earning a Tony for best lead actor in a musical for his role opposite Katharine Hepburn in “Coco.” He received further Tony nominations for 1973’s “The Good Doctor,” 1984’s “Big River,” and 1989’s “City of Angels.”

Auberjonois was also known for his voice roles, particularly in 1989’s Disney Renaissance hit “The Little Mermaid,” in which he voices Chef Louis and sang the memorable “Les Poissons.”

https://variety.com/2019/tv/people-news ... 203429137/


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_________________
I could be the catalyst that sparks the revolution
I could be an inmate in a long-term institution
I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die
I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by
What a waste...


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