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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2018
PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2018 11:15 pm 
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mdiehl wrote:
Of course it goes to WW2. The US and USSR were once brothers in arms. Now even the dogmatic leftists tell us to hate Russians.


"Brothers in Arms" . . . sing it brudda!

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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2018
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2018 9:50 am 
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C_S wrote:
At an age now where it's unpleasant to see how many ppl I like are buying the farm.

Next it'll be Jimmi, then BB King. And then the dominoes just start tipping over. Too sad to think about.


Washed away by the seas of time...

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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2018
PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 3:53 am 
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A Prisoner at 80+.

Sean Connery leaves New York massage center in pink polo.





Published on Aug 30, 2017
Sean Connery leaves New York massage center iwith pullover around his neck. Sean was walked out to his car by a caregiver.

Connery was born 1930 the video was published 2017, he's 88 now. Me, I am a youngster of 81++.

Am getting around a little better then he is in the video, but not much. Have to walk up 2+ flights of stairs, am handling them better then he is in the video, not a lot better.

He's got the care giver, I've got Ning, she doesn't have to hover over me like Connery's aide, but she watches me like a hawk.

Am not mocking Connery, or gloating because I may (or may not) be a bit fitter, just observing a natural phenomenon ... 'old age'.

As the Banana sez 'Washed away by the seas of time...'

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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2018
PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 1:56 pm 
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Quote:
Charles Aznavour, France's eternal crooner poet
[AFP]
Fiachra GIBBONS, Fran BLANDY
,AFP•October 1, 2018

Charles Aznavour, one of France's greatest singer-songwriters, performing in Paris on December 13, 2017 (AFP Photo/Eric FEFERBERG)
Aznavour, pictured in 1956, was also a gifted actor, bringing a rare intensity to the stage, turning every song into "a one-act play" (AFP Photo/-)
Aznavour, right, got his big break when he opened for the rising French star Edith Piaf, second-from-left (AFP Photo/-)

1 / 4
Charles Aznavour, one of France's greatest singer-songwriters, performing in Paris on December 13, 2017
Charles Aznavour, one of France's greatest singer-songwriters, performing in Paris on December 13, 2017 (AFP Photo/Eric FEFERBERG)

Paris (AFP) - They told him he was too ugly, too short and that he couldn't sing. But Charles Aznavour, who has died aged 94, became one of the greatest singer-songwriters of the 20th century.
(Continued)
https://www.yahoo.com/news/charles-azna ... 55650.html


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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2018
PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2018 7:19 am 
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Quote:
‘Star Trek’ actress Celeste Yarnall dead at 74
By Stephanie Nolasco | Fox News
https://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/s ... dead-at-74



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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2018
PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 12:25 pm 
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Joachim Ronneberg, the Norwegian resistance fighter who thwarted nazi Germany's atomic weapon plans dies aged 99...

Quote:
Joachim Ronneberg, the Norwegian resistance fighter who sabotaged Nazi Germany's nuclear weapons ambitions during World War Two, has died aged 99.

In 1943, he led a top-secret raid on a heavily-guarded plant in Norway's southern region of Telemark.

The operation was immortalised in the 1965 Hollywood film Heroes of Telemark, starring Kirk Douglas.

Ronneberg later worked as a radio journalist and helped raise awareness of the dangers of war among the young.

He told the BBC in 2013 that he only realised the importance of the mission after atomic bombs were dropped on Japan's Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

"He is one of our great heroes," Norway's Prime Minister Erna Solberg told NTB news agency. "Ronneberg is probably the last of the best known resistance fighters to pass away."

Born in 1919 in the town of Aalesund, Joachim Ronneberg fled Norway after the Nazis invaded in 1940.

The then 21-year-old escaped with eight friends by boat to Scotland, but was determined to return and fight.

Germany at the time needed so-called heavy water - with an extra atomic particle in its hydrogen nucleus - in its race against the Allies to produce an atomic bomb.

Large amounts of heavy water, or deuterium oxide, at that time was only made at the Norsk Hydro facility in Rjukan, Telemark.

This made the largest hydroelectric plant of its type a target for the resistance. But a small team tasked with destroying it in 1942 failed.

The following year, Ronneberg chose a team of five other commandos in an Allied operation codenamed Gunnerside.

"We were a gang of friends doing a job together," he told the BBC during the 70th anniversary of the mission.

The men parachuted on to a plateau, skied across country, descended into a ravine and crossed an icy river before using the railway line to get into the plant and set their explosives.

"We very often thought that this was a one way trip," he said.

After the explosion, the men escaped into neighbouring Sweden by skiing 320km (200 miles) across Telemark - despite being chased by some 3,000 German soldiers.

With a wry smile, Ronneberg described it as "the best skiing weekend I ever had".

The operation, coupled with US air raids the following year, led the Germans to abandon their plans and was later described as the most successful act of sabotage of World War Two.

Ronneberg was reluctant to talk about his experience despite numerous books, documentaries and TV series retelling the story.

He broke his silence in the 1970s, when he began raising awareness of the dangers of war among young people.

"Those growing up today need to understand that we must always be ready to fight for peace and freedom," he said.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45938874


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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2018
PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2018 12:10 am 
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Quote:
AP
‘Thank you for your service, buddy’: Police dog who helped nab more than 200 suspects dies
By Doug Phillips Sun Sentinel (TNS) Nov 5, 2018 Updated 10 hrs ago

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — When Hutch retired from the ranks of the Boynton Beach Police Department in 2014, the Belgian Malinois left crime fighting to the department’s other K-9’s and went to live with his police handler, Officer Mark Sohn.

When Hutch died Saturday at the age of 13, the department posted a tribute video on social media that recalled the dog’s storied career — taking part in more the apprehension of more than 200 criminal suspects from 2007 to 2014.

Along with recalling some of the arrests Hutch was involved in, the tribute notes that Sohn and Hutch won first place in the 2012 South Florida Police K9 Competition.

The two took part in the competition again in 2013.

“Thank you for your service, buddy. We love you and will miss you,” the tribute posting says.
And


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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2018
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 10:45 am 
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https://www.nbcnews.com/pop-culture/mov ... 90-n935036

Quote:
Douglas Rain, the creepy voice of HAL in '2001,' dies at 90

Rain's sinuous, detached reading of HAL's lines made the computer's murders of four astronauts all the more shocking.

Nov. 12, 2018 / 1:13 AM EST
By Alex Johnson

Douglas Rain, the acclaimed Shakespearean actor whose chilling performance as the voice of the homicidal HAL 9000 computer in "2001: A Space Odyssey" rendered the amoral emptiness of outer space in sound, died Sunday at age 90.

The Stratford Festival, the Canadian theater company of which Rain was a founding member in 1953, confirmed his death on Sunday night. A cause of death wasn't reported.

"Today we lost Douglas Rain, a member of our founding company and a hugely esteemed presence on our stages for 32 seasons," the company said. "He will be greatly missed. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family."

The HAL 9000 computer was the sentient controller of life support, systems and — although it wasn't revealed until later in the movie — the very mission of Discovery One, the spacecraft that is sent to Jupiter to investigate a mysterious black obelisk in the landmark 1968 science fiction film directed by Stanley Kubrick and co-written by Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke.

Rain's sinuous, detached reading of HAL's lines made the computer's murders of three astronauts as they slept in suspended animation and its subsequent stranding of astronaut Frank Poole to die in open space all the more shocking.

HAL's reasoning and explanation were cold, precise and — at least in its mind — unavoidably logical. He had been given conflicting programming: Ensure the success of the mission at all costs, while also protecting the lives of the crew. HAL concluded that the first command superseded the second.

"This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it," HAL quietly tells astronaut Dave Bowman before proceeding to explain matter-of-factly that it had learned of Bowman's and Poole's plans to disconnect it by reading their lips.

"The thing that captured the audience's imagination back then more even than a chatty computer decades before Siri and Alexa was that unnervingly, HAL had a mind of his own," the NPR critic Bob Mondello wrote in April on the 50th anniversary of the film's release.

A survey by the American Film Institute ranked HAL as the 13th-greatest villain in movie history.

Rain was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and trained at the Old Vic Theatre in London. In 1972, he was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Supporting or Featured Actor in a Drama for his performance as William Cecil in "Vivat! Vivat Regina!" on Broadway.

In 1953, he became a member of the first repertory cast of the Stratford Festival and performed in 32 seasons with the company.

According to Vincent Lobrutto's 1997 study "Stanley Kubrick: A Biography," Rain was initially contracted to narrate "2001" after Kubrick heard his narration of the short documentary "Universe," which was released by the National Film Board of Canada in 1960.

He ended up being cast as the character most central to the movie — HAL, which was short for "Heuristically programmed ALgorithmic computer" and wasn't, Clarke insisted for the rest of his life, a joke at IBM's expense. The letters H, A and L precede I, B and M in the alphabet.

"The voice of HAL in '2001: A Space Odyssey,' Douglas shared many of the same qualities as Kubrick's iconic creation; precision, strength of steel, enigma and infinite intelligence, as well as a wicked sense of humor," Antoni Cimolino, artistic director of the Stratford Festival, said in a statement reported by The London Free Press, the local newspaper.

"But those of us lucky enough to have worked with Douglas soon solved his riddle and discovered that at the center of his mystery lay warmth and humanity, evidenced in his care for the young members of our profession," he said. "Douglas dedicated his talent to the stages of his native land, and we are proud in return to dedicate the coming season's production of 'Othello' to his memory. We owe him so much."


Alex Johnson
Alex Johnson is a senior writer for NBC News covering general news, with an emphasis on explanatory journalism, data analysis, technology and religion. He is based in Los Angeles.








"HAL" has been deactivated.

RIP.

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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2018
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 3:14 pm 
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Marvel's Stan Lee dies aged 95...

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The feisty writer, editor and publisher was responsible for such iconic characters as Spider-Man, the X-Men, Thor, Iron Man, Black Panther and the Fantastic Four — 'nuff said.

Stan Lee, the legendary writer, editor and publisher of Marvel Comics whose fantabulous but flawed creations made him a real-life superhero to comic book lovers everywhere, has died. He was 95.

Lee, who began in the business in 1939 and created or co-created Black Panther, Spider-Man, the X-Men, the Mighty Thor, Iron Man, the Fantastic Four, the Incredible Hulk, Daredevil and Ant-Man, among countless other characters, died early Monday morning at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, a source told The Hollywood Reporter.

Lee's final few years were tumultuous. After Joan, his wife of 69 years, died in July 2017, he sued executives at POW! Entertainment — a company he founded in 2001 to develop film, TV and video game properties — for $1 billion alleging fraud, then abruptly dropped the suit weeks later. He also sued his ex-business manager and filed for a restraining order against a man who had been handling his affairs. (Lee's estate is estimated to be worth as much as $70 million.) And in June 2018, it was revealed that the Los Angeles Police Department had been investigating reports of elder abuse against him.

On his own and through his work with frequent artist-writer collaborators Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko (who died in July) and others, Lee catapulted Marvel from a tiny venture into the world's No. 1 publisher of comic books and, later, a multimedia giant.

In 2009, The Walt Disney Co. bought Marvel Entertainment for $4 billion, and most of the top-grossing superhero films of all time — led by Avengers: Infinity War's $2.05 billion worldwide take earlier this year — have featured Marvel characters.

"I used to think what I did was not very important," he told the Chicago Tribune in April 2014. "People are building bridges and engaging in medical research, and here I was doing stories about fictional people who do extraordinary, crazy things and wear costumes. But I suppose I have come to realize that entertainment is not easily dismissed."

Lee's fame and influence as the face and figurehead of Marvel, even in his nonagenarian years, remained considerable.

Beginning in the 1960s, the irrepressible and feisty Lee punched up his Marvel superheroes with personality, not just power. Until then, comic-book headliners like those of DC Comics were square and well-adjusted, but his heroes had human foibles and hang-ups; Peter Parker/Spider-Man, for example, fretted about his dandruff and was confused about dating. The evildoers were a mess of psychological complexity.

"His stories taught me that even superheroes like Spider-Man and The Incredible Hulk have ego deficiencies and girl problems and do not live in their macho fantasies 24 hours a day," Gene Simmons of Kiss said in a 1979 interview. "Through the honesty of guys like Spider-Man, I learned about the shades of gray in human nature."

(Kiss made it to the Marvel pages, and Lee had Simmons bleed into a vat of ink so the publisher could say those issues were printed with his blood.)

The Manhattan-born Lee wrote, art-directed and edited most of Marvel's series and newspaper strips. He also penned a monthly comics' column, “Stan's Soapbox,” signing off with his signature phrase, “Excelsior!”

His way of doing things at Marvel was to brainstorm a story with an artist, then write a synopsis. After the artist drew the story panels, Lee filled in the word balloons and captions. The process became known as “The Marvel Method.”

Lee collaborated with artist-writer Kirby on The Fantastic Four, Hulk, Iron Man, Thor, Silver Surfer and X-Men. With artist-writer Ditko, he created Spider-Man and the surgeon Doctor Strange and with artist Bill Everett came up with the blind superhero Daredevil.

Such collaborations sometimes led to credit disputes: Lee and Ditko reportedly engaged in bitter fights, and both receive writing credit on the Spider-Man movies and TV shows. "I don't want anyone to think I treated Kirby or Ditko unfairly," he told Playboy magazine in April 2014. "I think we had a wonderful relationship. Their talent was incredible. But the things they wanted weren't in my power to give them."

Like any Marvel employee, Lee had no rights to the characters he helped create and received no royalties.

In the 1970s, Lee importantly helped push the boundaries on censorship in comics, delving into serious and topical subject matter in a medium that had become mindless, kid-friendly entertainment.

In 1954, the publication of psychologist Frederic Wertham's book Seduction of the Innocent had spurred calls for the government to regulate violence, sex, drug use, questioning of public authority figures, etc. in the comics as a way to curtail "juvenile delinquency."

Wary publishers headed that off by forming the Comics Code Authority, a self-censoring body that while avoiding the heavy hand of Washington still wound up neutering adult interest in comics and stereotyping the medium as one only kids would enjoy.

Lee scripted banal scenarios with characters like Nellie the Nurse and Tessie the Typist, but in 1971, he inserted an anti-drug storyline into "The Amazing Spider-Man” in which Peter Parker's best friend Harry Osborn popped pills. Those issues, which did not carry the CCA "seal of approval" on the covers, became extremely popular, and later, the organization relaxed some of its guidelines.

Born Stanley Martin Lieber on Dec. 28, 1922, he grew up poor in Washington Heights, where his father, a Romanian immigrant, was a dress-cutter. A lover of adventure books and Errol Flynn movies, he graduated from DeWitt Clinton High School, joined the WPA Federal Theatre Project, where he appeared in a few stage shows, and wrote obituaries.

In 1939, Lee got a job as a gofer for $8 a week at Marvel predecessor Timely Comics. Two years later, for Kirby and Joe Simon's "Captain America #3," he wrote a two-page story titled "The Traitor's Revenge!" that was used as text filler to qualify the company for the inexpensive magazine mailing rate. He used the pen name Stan Lee.

He was named interim editor at 19 by publisher Martin Goodman when the previous editor quit. In 1942, he enlisted in the Army and served in the Signal Corps, where he wrote manuals and training films with a group that included Frank Capra, William Saroyan and Theodor Geisel. After the war, he returned to the publisher and was the editor for decades.

Following DC Comics' lead with the Justice League, Lee and Kirby in November 1961 launched their own superhero series, The Fantastic Four, for the newly renamed Marvel Comics, and Hulk, Spider-Man, Doctor Strange, Daredevil and X-Men soon followed. The Avengers launched as its own title in September 1963.

Perhaps not surprisingly, Manhattan's high-literary culture vultures did not cast its approval on how Lee was making a living. People would “avoid me like I had the plague … today, it's so different,” he once told The Washington Post.

Not everyone felt the same way, though. Lee recalled once being visiting in his New York office by Federico Fellini, who wanted to talk about nothing but Spider-Man.

In 1972, Lee was named publisher and relinquished the Marvel editorial reins to spend all his time promoting the company. He moved to Los Angeles in 1980 to set up an animation studio and to build relationships in Hollywood. Lee purchased a home overlooking the Sunset Strip that was once owned by Jack Benny's announcer, Don Wilson.

Long before his Marvel characters made it to the movies, they appeared on television. An animated Spider-Man show (with a memorable theme song composed by Oscar winner Paul Francis Webster of "The Shadow of Your Smile" fame and Bob Harris) ran on ABC from 1967–70. Bill Bixby played Dr. David Banner, who turns into a green monster (Lou Ferrigno) when he gets agitated, in the 1977-82 CBS drama The Incredible Hulk. And Pamela Anderson provided the voice of Stripperella, a risque animated Spike TV series that Lee wrote for in 2003-04.

Lee launched the Internet-based Stan Lee Media in 1998, and the superhero creation, production and marketing studio went public a year later. However, when investigators uncovered illegal stock manipulation by his partners, the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in 2001. (Lee was never charged.)

In 2002, Lee published an autobiography, Excelsior! The Amazing Life of Stan Lee.

Survivors include a daughter J.C. and younger brother Larry Lieber, a writer and artist for Marvel. Another daughter, Jan, died in infancy. His wife Joan was a hat model whom he married in 1947.

Like Alfred Hitchcock before him, the never-bashful Lee appeared in cameos in the Marvel movies, shown avoiding falling concrete, watering his lawn, delivering the mail, crashing a wedding, playing a security guard, etc.

In Spider-Man 3 (2007), he chats with Tobey Maguire's Peter Parker as they stop on a Times Square street to read news that the webslinger will soon receive the key to the city. “You know," he says, "I guess one person can make a difference … 'nuff said.”

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/ ... end-721450


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I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by
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 Post subject: Re: No One Here Gets Out Alive - 2018
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 6:46 pm 
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That guy made so many people rich.

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