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 Post subject: The Granada Wars 1481 to 1492 plus
PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 7:56 am 
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The a series of 12 short videos detailing Isabel and Ferdenand's last battles of the reconquest.

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 Post subject: Re: The Granada Wars 1481 to 1492 plus
PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 11:49 am 
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Interesting channel.


Here is the Granada Wars series in playlist format, so you can just let it run straight through.


There is also one on the long Recqonquista as a whole.

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 Post subject: Re: The Granada Wars 1481 to 1492 plus
PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 5:03 pm 
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The above links cover the last of the 'Reconquesta', what followed?

Quote:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebellion ... %80%931501)
The Rebellion of the Alpujarras (1499–1501) were a series of uprisings by the Muslim population of the Kingdom of Granada, Crown of Castile (formerly, the Emirate of Granada) against their Catholic rulers. They began in 1499 in the city of Granada in response to mass forced conversion of the Muslim population to the Catholic faith, which were perceived as violations of the 1491 Treaty of Granada.[2][3][4] The uprising in the city quickly died down, but it was followed by more serious revolts in the nearby mountainous area of the Alpujarra. The Catholic forces, on some occasions led personally by King Ferdinand, succeeded in suppressing the revolts and exacted severe punishment on the Muslim population.
The Catholic rulers used these revolts as a justification to abolish the Treaty of Granada and the rights of the Muslims guaranteed by the treaty.
(Continued)

and
Quote:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebellion ... E2%80%9371)
The rebellion of the Alpujarras of 1568–71, sometimes called the War of the Alpujarras or the Morisco Revolt, was the second such revolt against the Castilian Crown in the mountainous Alpujarra region. The rebels were Moriscos, the nominally Catholic descendants of the Mudéjares (Muslims under Castilian rule) following the first rebellion of the Alpujarras (1499–1501).
By 1250, the Reconquest of Spain by the Catholic powers had left only the Emirate of Granada, in southern Spain.[1] In 1492 Granada city fell to the "Catholic Monarchs"—Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabel of Castile—and under the terms of capitulation the whole Muslim-majority region came under Christian rule.
However, the Muslim inhabitants of the city soon revolted against Christian rule in 1499, followed by the mountain villages: this revolt was suppressed fairly quickly, by 1501.[2] The Muslims under Christian rule (until then known as Mudejares) were then obliged to convert to Christianity, becoming a nominally Catholic population known as "Moriscos").
Discontent among the new "Moriscos" led to a second rebellion, led by a Morisco known as Aben Humeya, starting in December 1568 and lasting till March 1571. This violent conflict took place mainly in the mountainous Alpujarra region, on the southern slopes of the Sierra Nevada, between Granada city and the Mediterranean coast and is often known as the War of the Alpujarras.[3][note 1]
Most of the Morisco population was then expelled from the Kingdom of Granada and was dispersed throughout the Kingdom of Castille (modern day Castile, Extremadura and Andalusia). As this left many mountain villages in Granada almost empty, Catholic resettlers were brought in from other parts of the country.
Between 1609 and 1614, the Spanish Crown undertook the expulsion of the Moriscos from all over Spain. Although about half of Granada's morisco remained in the region after the dispersal, only 2000 were expelled from the city of Granada, many remaining mixed with and protected by old Christians who were less hostile towards them than in other regions of Spain (notably Valencia).[4][5]
(Continued)

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 Post subject: Re: The Granada Wars 1481 to 1492 plus
PostPosted: Wed Aug 23, 2017 5:33 pm 
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Quote:
Muslims in Spain, 1500 to 1614 (review)
Marijan Gubic
From: Mediterranean Quarterly
Volume 17, Number 4, Fall 2006
pp. 160-163

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:
Reviewed by
Marijan Gubic (bio)
L. P. Harvey: Muslims in Spain, 1500 to 1614. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005. 448 pages. ISBN 0-226-31963-6. $40.
The timeliness of L. P. Harvey's seminal study on the Muslims in Spain cannot be overstated. Muslims in Spain, 1500 to 1614 represents the author's intense research and reflects a remarkable exploration of the history and literature of Muslim communities in the Iberian Peninsula. It also continues in the tradition of his earlier Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500 in terms of the depth and range of scholarship, analytical skills, and moral clarity. Harvey is professor emeritus of Spanish at the University of London and a fellow of King's College. His credentials are impeccable and his use of sources remarkably lucid. There is no escaping the present through this historical study. It provokes complex and incommodious questions about contemporary Islam and Europe through the tumultuous upheavals and injustices of the past.
The story begins with the Christian conquest of Granada and a Muslim rebellion in 1500 that provoked a response from the ruling Christian authorities, leading to conversions of the Muslim population. The forced conversions led to the creation of a new religious class, the Moriscos, who were converts from Islam to Christianity. The conversions, more by force than by proselytizing, ended by 1526, and many continued to regard themselves Muslim and to practice their religion under extremely difficult and strenuous conditions. Muslims in Spain is a story, according to the author, of the final century of Muslim presence in the Iberian Peninsula and an effort to trace what happened from the time Muslims were forcibly converted to Christianity up to the end of 1614, culminating in their expulsion from Spain. Harvey's study examines this process of conversion, assimilation, and finally expulsion, focusing on the beginnings and [End Page 160] development of crypto-Islam in the Iberian Peninsula, the surviving form of Islam in Spain.
The author describes the story in the following terms: It was not until 1500 that Muslims in Spain had to confront the problem of what to do about the threat of conversion under duress. The conquest year of 1492 had been a landmark year, certainly, but whereas the conquest of Granada bought the end of the last bastion of political autonomy for Muslims in the peninsula, it did not bring about any forcible conversions. After 1492 all up and down the length and breadth of Spain Muslims practiced and enjoyed freedom to worship as their forefathers had worshipped. Those rights were in most cases entrenched not just in a single constitutional instrument but also in an array of capitulations, charters, coronation oaths, and other formal guarantees.
The history of Muslims in Spain and the various interpretations of conversions remains the subject of disagreement. Harvey reminds us that the circumstances under which public worship, according to the religion of Islam, was brought to an end in the Iberian Peninsula are interpreted differently by Muslims and Christians. Here the author examines the treatment of Muslims under the terms of the capitulation of the city of Granada in 1492, suggesting that the vanquished in battle could have expected to be treated favorably. That treatment included the rights to be left in possession of most of their property and to continue to worship God as they saw fit. However, this favorable treatment was dependent on total military and political submission. Although Harvey is correct to point out that the equal treatment of Muslims, in the sense of their not suffering expropriations and their being able to continue to live in their homes and practice their religion, is not alien to the modern mind, it was a rather innovative and unique policy for the fifteenth century. Unfortunately, the author does not explore further the texts of the capitulations and their significance for European understanding of self and the other. Harvey's examination of the self-understanding and the tensions between Christians and Muslims in Spain takes place against a background of emerging tensions in the Mediterranean, with the rising power of the Turks and threats to the prevailing European qua Christian order. There is no solace in the fact...
A brief sample of the review that points out some omissions.

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 Post subject: Re: The Granada Wars 1481 to 1492 plus
PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 4:49 am 
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A good chance to read more about Reconquista and what followed it.

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 Post subject: Re: The Granada Wars 1481 to 1492 plus
PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2017 3:25 pm 
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I'd play that game !!! :D

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 Post subject: Re: The Granada Wars 1481 to 1492 plus
PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 2017 9:17 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: The Granada Wars 1481 to 1492 plus
PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:30 am 
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https://www.amazon.com/Empires-Sea-Battle-Lepanto-Contest/dp/0812977645

Empires of the Sea is a great read ... it describes the roughly 50 year period of naval clashes in the med between the christians and the moozlims ... the seige of malta is very detailed and interesting ... almost house to house descriptions ... and we get to learn about "St Elmos Fire" and "Valletta" up close. Definitely recommended!

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 Post subject: Re: The Granada Wars 1481 to 1492 plus
PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 5:34 pm 
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jwilkerson wrote:
https://www.amazon.com/Empires-Sea-Battle-Lepanto-Contest/dp/0812977645

Empires of the Sea is a great read ... it describes the roughly 50 year period of naval clashes in the med between the christians and the moozlims ... the seige of malta is very detailed and interesting ... almost house to house descriptions ... and we get to learn about "St Elmos Fire" and "Valletta" up close. Definitely recommended!
Haven't read that yet, but have read 'The Great Siege: Malta 1565 Paperback – August 19, 2014
by Ernle Bradford (Author)' https://www.amazon.com/Great-Siege-Malt ... 1497637864.

A side note, was introduced to the Malta story by a British friend who recommended 'Kappillan of Malta Paperback – December 31, 2001 by Nicholas Monsarrat' https://www.amazon.com/Kappillan-Malta- ... 0304358444 (First published 1973)

Worth a read.

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