maddogdrivethru.net

Open all night
It is currently Sun Aug 19, 2018 11:39 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Forum rules


It's the Gulag of Fun



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 652 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 62, 63, 64, 65, 66  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Military stuff ... past and present.
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 2:36 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major

Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2008 4:43 pm
Posts: 15131
Reputation points: 1834
Kameolontti wrote:
...

Song from when during the era of my great grandfather Finns served as Finnish Guard in the Russian Empire, fighting the Turks and other enemies of the empire far from home.

Damn those folks had to march far and wide.

The song is composed as a 'homecoming march' for the Finnish Guard. English lyrics on the video.

Quote:
Angel Naidenov

After the suppression of Bulgarian April Uprising in 1876 nearly 100,000 were put to death, men, women, children... A year later many came to fight for those who can not protect themselves, and to help those who need help. What is known as Russo-Turkish War (1877–1878). And the Finns were among them. The Finnish Guards' Rifle Battalion, of nearly 1000.
They distinguished themselves in the battle of Gorni Dubnjak, when the Finns were the ones, who finally get over the walls of the fort. Gorni Dubnjak were a fortified stronghold, ensuring supply route for besieged Turkish army of 70000 strong at Pleven. So it was vital to take it, and finish the encirclement.

Thank you Finns, for participating in that war, we have not forgot those days. Warm greetings from Bulgaria.


Check the comments section. Bulgarians remember.

Good post, I accept the march, your story.

My unit march, III/78 UudJP.



This is much better version than the YL version from late 1990's that is usually found, more uumpf, faster tempo, more like the real thing. I am particular with this with a good reason. ;)

PS. This Sotilasmusiikkikoulu has pretty good instrumental versions of selected marches.

_________________
The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt

Mit der Dummheit kämpfen selbst Götter vergebens.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Military stuff ... past and present.
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 5:15 pm 
Offline
buck private
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 8:01 am
Posts: 15557
Reputation points: 11978

_________________
"Experience must be our only guide. Reason may mislead us."
John Dickinson
Constitutional Convention of 1787


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Military stuff ... past and present.
PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 1:27 am 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 29922
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
https://warisboring.com/when-american-c ... the-skies/

Quote:
When American Citizens Watched the Skies

The Ground Observer Corps was the U.S. military’s first early warning system

B HISTORY July 24, 2018 Matthew Gault 0

World War II104

This story originally appeared on July 22, 2015.

The bombing of Pearl Harbor changed America forever. The entire population went to war. Millions of men went overseas to fight, families back home grew victory gardens and bought war bonds, Rosie the Riveter took over manufacturing, the mafia protected the ports and more than a million Americans watched the skies.

These millions of men, women, children and even a few dogs were part of the Ground Observer Corps — a volunteer branch of the U.S. Army Air Forces tasked with watching the skies and keeping America safe.

From the outbreak of World War II until the advent of advanced radar and communication technology in 1959, ordinary citizens waited, watched and reported on everything they saw above them. Their numbers waxed and waned over the years — GOC had 1.5 million members at its height and slightly more than 200,000 when it ended — but the citizens always took the job seriously.


Sometimes, too seriously. The GOC was responsible for more false alarms than actual threat detections. But it made ordinary citizens feel part of the war effort and had a surprising impact on popular culture.



This is the story of the Ground Observer Corps of the aircraft early warning service,” the woman says. The camera zooms in on her face. She looks like your mother and she’s deadly serious.
“It may be a long story or it may be a short one. That depends on how soon we lick ‘em. We hope it’ll be a short one. But if it’s long, we’ll be in it at the end. Just as we were at the beginning.”


This is the opening scene from a U.S. Army propaganda film from 1943 called Eyes Aloft! — a short film featuring the brave men and women of the GOC. The camera cuts across the whole of America, depicting farmers, businessman, children, couples and bachelors watching the skies.

Some sit atop buildings in cities while others climb poles in the desert, all while the narrator explains the situation in her homespun, matter-of-fact tone. Eyes Aloft! is great, not only for its campy nostalgic appeal, but for its insight into how the Corps actually worked.

The U.S. Army Air Forces trained its 1.5 million volunteers to identify enemy planes by look and sound. The Corps’ members would then sit somewhere with an open view of the sky and wait to see something.

When they did, they’d pick up the phone and say “army flash,” and an operator would put them through to a “filler center.”

“After a ground observer picks up his phone, says army flash and tells his story to a woman in the filter center, his job is done,” the film reel explains. The footage lingers on the filter center, a large room filled with women smoking, answering phones and moving models around on a map.

“Of course, the job down there is just starting. It’s a big room with a map of a whole area, a lot of telephones, target stands and plenty of fast, precise work … every airplane in the air is tracked on that board.”

This is how the Ground Observer Corps worked during its almost two-decade run. See something strange flying through the sky? Call the filter center. The filter center would try to predict the object’s flight path and report its location to the military.


The military would look through flight plans, records and lists of training exercises. If it couldn’t match what the observers saw with its records, it scrambled fighters. Finally, while the military’s planes flew toward the target, GOC fed them information about the path of the foreign object.

The constant stream of information between civilians and the military kept America safe during the years before advanced radar techniques. “Nobody flies up there that we don’t know about,” the narrator says. For a time, she was right.

The threat of another attack on American soil waned as the Allies beat back the Axis powers in Europe and the Pacific. In 1944, the U.S. Army Air Forces shut down the Ground Observer Corps. Just a few years later, a different kind of war revived them.

Image

Above — Ground Observer Corps propaganda. U.S. government images via living-in-the-the-past.com. At top — a still from Eyes Aloft! YouTube capture
The Soviet Union detonated its first atomic bomb in 1949. The United States was no longer the only country with a nuclear weapon. Radar technology and infrastructure still wasn’t capable of watching over every inch of American sky.

People worried that Moscow would nuke Washington at any moment.

The now-independent U.S. Air Force revived the Ground Observer Corps in 1950, and citizens once again took to their roofs to watch the skies for strange lights and sounds. Pres. Harry Truman authorized Operation Skywatch in 1952, which further funded and expanded the group.

“We will need every minute and every second of warning that our Skywatchers can give us,” Truman said.

But the citizenry of the ’50s was not like that of the ’40s. Many Americans were tired of war, and opinions on the Soviet Union and the threat it posed were more divided and nuanced than popular culture has depicted.

The Corps had trouble getting and keeping members. At its height in 1956, 380,000 people worked in 17,000 outposts scattered coast to coast. The Air Force ran more than 40 filter centers to collect the incoming calls. A far cry from the million-plus Americans who watched during World War II.

The numbers varied wildly depending on the time of the year and level of tension with Moscow. Summer was good to the Corps. Teen and preteen boys filled the ranks of the skywatchers when school let out, and people were more likely to sit up late, watching the sky when the weather was warmer.

To convince people to join the Corps and watch the skies, Washington pumped money into propaganda. It produced film reels such as Eyes Aloft!, posters, pamphlets and a magazine called The Aircraft Flash. Corps members could earn medals and ribbons based on their time in the service.

The popular radio show Fibber McGee & Molly even ran a few episodes centered around the characters visiting with Corps volunteers. In the story, Molly volunteers to watch the skies — as a good American should, of course. Fibber McGee, her loveable goof of a husband, wants to go fishing.

“I’m not against the airplane watching you’re doing, kiddo,” he says. “I just merely don’t know what you … can do that the United States Air Force can’t do. And do better.”

The Aircraft Flash was something special. Reading them, “one enters a time warp to the heart of the Cold War,” W. Patrick McCray wrote in Keep Watching the Skies!, a book which recounts the history of the project.

“Magazine covers sported attractive women spotters or military hardware with photos inside showing fundraisers, parade floats and young winners of beauty contests all sponsored by the Ground Observer Corps.”

Many of the articles profiled the citizens who spent their days heroically watching the skies. A warden in North Carolina even forced his inmates to work for the Corps. Families pressed their pets into service.

“One person trained the family dog to bark when planes flew overhead,” McCray wrote. “While another spotter owned a goose that could honk a similar alert. Even blind Americans gave their time by working at filter centers or, in some cases, putting their ‘keen sense of hearing’ to work during times of bad weather and poor visibility.”

With all these people — an animals — watching the skies and not much except American planes flying overhead, false alarms and strange sightings skyrocketed.

The Air Force shut down the Ground Observer Corps in 1959 — radar and communication tech had advanced a lot in a decade. The Pentagon built ballistic missile early warning systems and other radar arrays on America’s coasts, in its waters and on the soil of its allies.

No one needed the Corps anymore.

But some Americans kept watching the skies. Sightings of UFOs spiked in the ’60s, and the mix of past training and Cold War paranoia led to a fear of little green men that found expression in movies, comics and films.

The Corps also inspired another joint venture between Washington and its people — Operation Moonwatch. It was a joint venture of amateur scientists, telescope enthusiasts and the military working together to track satellites.


Interesting article and video.

I had seen glimpses of this in some old movies (I think the lead female character in the film Summer of 42 was such an observer) but this was the first article or video that provided more detailed information regarding this.

What was even more surprising to me is that this was resurrected after WW 2 in response to the Soviets getting the H-bomb.

It's amazing that they once had 1.5 million people looking up at the sky for the enemy.

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Military stuff ... past and present.
PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 4:56 am 
Offline
buck private
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 8:01 am
Posts: 15557
Reputation points: 11978

One plus for me is the Swiss guard's marching, more relaxed/casual, not the stomping that's common in many forces.

How good would they be in battle, who knows, 500 years since they last fought. Besides they're main job is protecting the pope.


_________________
"Experience must be our only guide. Reason may mislead us."
John Dickinson
Constitutional Convention of 1787


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Military stuff ... past and present.
PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 10:29 am 
Offline
His Most Gracious Majesty, Commie of the Year
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 12:44 pm
Posts: 7798
Reputation points: 17050
abradley wrote:

One plus for me is the Swiss guard's marching, more relaxed/casual, not the stomping that's common in many forces.

How good would they be in battle, who knows, 500 years since they last fought. Besides they're main job is protecting the pope.



If they practice with intent on halberd techniques then they will be formidable foe to any non-firearm opponent.

Halberds are insanely good weapons and outclass and outperform almost everything. In addition it is easy enough to choose between lethal and non-lethal techniques depending on the situation and those things are both fast and their reach surprises anyone not used to them. Yes, it's twice the range where you think you're safe!

Halberd is the kind of weapon that will not only go through your block but it will also cause you to lose limbs after carving through your block or parry.

_________________
Screw you nero


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Military stuff ... past and present.
PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 10:32 am 
Offline
His Most Gracious Majesty, Commie of the Year
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 12:44 pm
Posts: 7798
Reputation points: 17050
nero wrote:
Good post, I accept the march, your story.

My unit march, III/78 UudJP.



This is much better version than the YL version from late 1990's that is usually found, more uumpf, faster tempo, more like the real thing. I am particular with this with a good reason. ;)

PS. This Sotilasmusiikkikoulu has pretty good instrumental versions of selected marches.


This is my march as well, did my time in KymJP "we don't defend, we assault the Russians".

As of now my position is different of course but you can't erase the memories and feelings of a panzerjäger battalion marching to that tune.

_________________
Screw you nero


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Military stuff ... past and present.
PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2018 2:48 am 
Offline
buck private
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 8:01 am
Posts: 15557
Reputation points: 11978

_________________
"Experience must be our only guide. Reason may mislead us."
John Dickinson
Constitutional Convention of 1787


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Military stuff ... past and present.
PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 12:58 am 
Offline
His Most Gracious Majesty, Commie of the Year
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 12:44 pm
Posts: 7798
Reputation points: 17050
Researcher Pauli Järvenpää of Estonia's Defense Forces research institute:

"The shortcomings of Sweden's defenses came out in a sad way during Sweden's last year's Aurora 17-grand military exercise.
The full volunteer system was unable to produce required number of reserves, the equipment of soldiers was outdated and compatibility with other countries' systems wasn't anywhere near the level it was imagined to be at." was Järvenpää's assessment.


Well, that's what happens when you on purpose dismantle your entire military, isn't it? If you destroy your defensive capabilities as part of some Marxist "no borders" campaign, well, you won't have any real defensive capabilities then.

Their great idols the communists never would have dreamt of cutting military spending anywhere below 20-40% of GDP, yes they spoke of no borders yet they were the ones who built The Wall and who gunned down people trying to leave.

I can see where their thinking relates to that of Sweden. "Our system is perfect, or else.."

Fortunately the Swedes are a paper tiger version of socialists. They have all the crazy but none of the raw vitality and strength. Whereas the real commies will nail your bible to your chest and torture you at a concentration camp and subject you to human experiments for voicing a wrong opinion the Swedes merely call you a Nazi and agree not to talk to you.

_________________
Screw you nero


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Military stuff ... past and present.
PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 4:37 am 
Offline
Sergeant Major

Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2008 4:43 pm
Posts: 15131
Reputation points: 1834
Kameolontti wrote:
Researcher Pauli Järvenpää of Estonia's Defense Forces research institute:

"The shortcomings of Sweden's defenses came out in a sad way during Sweden's last year's Aurora 17-grand military exercise.
The full volunteer system was unable to produce required number of reserves, the equipment of soldiers was outdated and compatibility with other countries' systems wasn't anywhere near the level it was imagined to be at." was Järvenpää's assessment.


Well, that's what happens when you on purpose dismantle your entire military, isn't it? If you destroy your defensive capabilities as part of some Marxist "no borders" campaign, well, you won't have any real defensive capabilities then.

Their great idols the communists never would have dreamt of cutting military spending anywhere below 20-40% of GDP, yes they spoke of no borders yet they were the ones who built The Wall and who gunned down people trying to leave.

I can see where their thinking relates to that of Sweden. "Our system is perfect, or else.."

Fortunately the Swedes are a paper tiger version of socialists. They have all the crazy but none of the raw vitality and strength. Whereas the real commies will nail your bible to your chest and torture you at a concentration camp and subject you to human experiments for voicing a wrong opinion the Swedes merely call you a Nazi and agree not to talk to you.

Pauli Järvenpää is quite right, that ending conscription 2010 was an an error, now recruiting 4000 a year is not nearly enough. Especially when during the cold war about 85% of Swedish men were enlisted.

But then you drop the ball when accusing communists and "marxists" abandoning conscription. The center-right coalition was in power 2006-2014. Perhaps wulfie can verify this.

But then in you crusade against Sweden it is obvious that your head is so full of shi... err ... ignorance that you have headaches quite often. :(

Image

Otan Hotan.

_________________
The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt

Mit der Dummheit kämpfen selbst Götter vergebens.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Military stuff ... past and present.
PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 2:13 pm 
Offline
His Most Gracious Majesty, Commie of the Year
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 12:44 pm
Posts: 7798
Reputation points: 17050
In Sweden the right wing are way more to the left than the far left in the US for instance. Hence why if you have the flag of Sweden in your flagpole you're immediately some far right Nazi.

The same sentiment can be found around Helsinki too in the lefties. Just I find it far more challenged in Finland.

Indeed you're probably right that the right wing parties did the decision. Same as in Finland the "right wing" don't really want to support national defense or even make Finland a better place but just to suck all the loose change from everyone else's pockets they can and they see national defense as another thing they can cut in order to give themselves some tax cuts.

This is also why I oppose NATO membership - they'd all jump right at the chance to dismantle our defenses with "oh, the Americans have us covered now".

My opposition to Sweden's Jihad could indeed be called Crusade. I am for maintaining our Christian values, I don't care for the religion itself but it has some nice values, certainly superior to Islam. Meanwhile Swedes have made it not only their business to assimilate their culture to Islam but also to sell this to the world as some great thing everyone should do to win moral points.

So yea, I oppose them, I Crusade against their regressive ways in a peaceful manner by talking about the things. My details are not always right but Islam is a cancer that we must not let take root here, it is not just cancer - it is infectious and contaminates everything it touches. It already controls vast areas of our planet with massive populations. It has no need for extra room. It's spread threatens the future of our human species.

_________________
Screw you nero


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 652 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 62, 63, 64, 65, 66  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group