maddogdrivethru.net

Open all night
It is currently Sun Oct 21, 2018 5:16 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Forum rules


It's the Gulag of Fun



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 151 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 12, 13, 14, 15, 16  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Idiots of the world unite!
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2018 8:38 am 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 30852
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
The latest in tax increases in Seattle:

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-ne ... employers/

Quote:
Seattle City Council votes 9-0 for scaled-down head tax on large employers

Originally published May 14, 2018 at 4:17 pm Updated May 14, 2018 at 9:20 pm

The legislation calls for a tax of $275 per employee, per year on for-profit companies that gross at least $20 million per year in the city — down from a $500-per-head tax that Mayor Jenny Durkan had threatened to veto.

By Matt Day and Daniel Beekman
Seattle Times staff reporters

After a weekend of high-stakes negotiations between Seattle City Council members and Mayor Jenny Durkan, the council voted unanimously Monday to tax the city’s largest employers to help address homelessness.

Starting next year, the tax will be $275 per employee, per year on for-profit companies that gross at least $20 million per year in the city — down from a $500-per-head proposal that Durkan threatened to veto.



The city declared a homelessness state of emergency in late 2015. A point-in-time count last year tallied more than 11,600 homeless people in King County and one in 16 Seattle Public Schools students is homeless.

“We have community members who are dying,” Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda said before the 9-0 vote. “They are dying on our streets today because there is not enough shelter” and affordable housing.

In a statement after the vote and weeks of fierce debate, demonstrations and denunciations, she said the tax “will have a meaningful impact on addressing our homelessness crisis by building housing and providing health services.”

Having paused construction planning on an office tower over the larger proposal, Amazon now will move ahead with it, a spokesman said after the vote. But the company’s plans to occupy a skyscraper under construction are still up the air, he said.

“We are disappointed by today’s City Council decision to introduce a tax on jobs,” spokesman Drew Herdener said in a statement.

“While we have resumed construction planning for Block 18, we remain very apprehensive about the future created by the council’s hostile approach and rhetoric toward larger businesses, which forces us to question our growth here.”

Council members were working on the deal past midnight Sunday, and council staff postponed Mother’s Day plans to assist, they said. On the line: money to house struggling people, Seattle’s reputation as a tech-boom town and the city’s political soul.

About 3 percent of Seattle businesses will be taxed, raising about $47 million per year, according to the council.

The larger proposal would have raised $86 million annually, according to a council estimate Monday, based on updated data from the city’s budget office.

The council ordinance calls for the tax to end after five years, with renewal requiring a council vote in 2023.

With more than 45,000 employees in the city, Amazon could pay more than $10 million per year. Some proponents of the measure used the slogan “tax Amazon,” arguing the e-commerce behemoth owed Seattle help with its affordability problem.

Other companies set to be taxed include Starbucks, The Seattle Times and longtime, family-owned supermarket Uwajimaya.


The tax that won approval is much smaller than the proposal that had been under consideration for many weeks and that was vehemently opposed by the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce.

The compromise
For months, Durkan left council members to drive the public discussion. But a 5-4 council split over the $500-per-head proposal raised the prospect she could exercise her veto power and forced her to engage.


A new law needs six votes to override a mayoral veto.

On one side were homeless advocates, service-worker unions and voters looking for Seattle to do more to help vulnerable people. On the other were business leaders, construction-worker unions and voters critical of how City Hall has been spending money.

Amazon contributed $350,000 this past year to a business group that supported Durkan’s mayoral campaign.

At Monday’s council meeting, some in the crowd waved signs that read “housing first,” while others countered with signs that read “results first.”

In the end, Durkan pushed for the smaller tax. She plans to sign the legislation, she said Monday.

Under the original proposal, the city would have switched from a head tax to a 0.7 percent payroll tax in 2021 — a change to help low-margin businesses with many modestly paid workers, such as supermarkets. Under the approved ordinance, there will be no payroll tax.


“We saw what happens when we come together, sit down together, and work together — we can find common ground and get things done,” Durkan said in a statement.

Activists who spent months lobbying for a head tax on large employers hailed the council’s action.

“Is this bill everything we hoped for? No. Is it a major step forward? Absolutely,” the Transit Riders Union said in an email to supporters.

Working Washington, a union-backed advocacy group that accused Amazon of felony intimidation last week over the company’s planning pause, also applauded the vote.

“Seattle refused to knuckle under,” the group said in an email.

Amazon will resume planning for its Block 18 tower and continue weighing whether to sublease the space in the Rainier Square skyscraper, Herdener said. Before the tax debate, the retail giant had been expecting the two buildings to accommodate about 7,000 employees.


In a biting statement, a Starbucks spokesman accused city leaders of failing to spend effectively on homelessness and ignoring children sleeping outside.

“If they cannot provide a warm meal and safe bed to a five-year-old child, no one believes they will be able to make housing affordable or address opiate addiction,” said John Kelly, the company’s top public-affairs executive.

Councilmember Kshama Sawant cast the only “no” vote Monday on an amendment that reduced the size of the tax but joined her colleagues approving the overall measure. She mentioned the immense wealth Amazon has created for CEO Jeff Bezos, who recently became the world’s richest person and is worth an estimated $130 billion.

“There is no way this tax will be a burden on big businesses in Seattle,” Sawant said, slamming the mayor for siding with “Amazon billionaires.”


How money will be spent
Along with the tax Monday, the council approved a nonbinding resolution that calls for spending 66 percent of the new money on affordable housing, 32 percent on emergency shelter, trash pickup, raises for service workers and other needs, and 2 percent on administration.

The plan says the revenue could help build 591 units of low-income housing over five years — down from 1,700 units slated under the $500-per-head tax.


An effort by Sawant to prohibit any of the revenue from being spent on sweeps of unauthorized homeless encampments was voted down 8-1.

In a news conference after the council acted, Durkan expressed dissatisfaction with the council’s spending plan. The mayor wants a greater percentage of the money spent on emergency options and on addressing street encampments.

Durkan stressed the city must be transparent with Seattle residents about how the revenue is spent. She said she would create an oversight committee to monitor that.

“As a city we have to know that our strategies are going to work,” the mayor said, also calling on King County and state lawmakers to “step up and shoulder their fair share” in dealing with homelessness.

Homeless-services workers and unions representing supermarket and hotel workers, among others, supported the larger tax proposal, which was sponsored by Councilmembers Mosqueda, M. Lorena González, Lisa Herbold and Mike O’Brien.

They said companies such as Amazon have contributed to homelessness because their highly paid employees have sent rents and home prices soaring.


“We could not find the votes we needed,” a disappointed O’Brien said before voting for the smaller proposal.

González said she was in regular contact with Durkan over the weekend and had “a couple of work sessions with her and her staff.”

The council member said she had hoped to be voting “on a different package” with more money, but “I’m glad to be able to finally move this forward.”

Construction-worker unions worried about losing work building for Amazon opposed the larger tax, as did Council President Bruce Harrell, Councilmembers Sally Bagshaw, Debora Juarez and Rob Johnson. Some business leaders said the city should instead ease zoning restrictions to allow more new housing.

Though Seattle’s population grew 11 percent from 2012 to 2016, its government spending rose much faster, even accounting for inflation.

The city budgeted $63 million for homeless programs and will invest more than $100 million in affordable housing this year.

“The city does not have a revenue problem — it has a spending efficiency problem,” Herdener said in his statement for Amazon.

Johnson called the $275-per-head tax a “reasonable compromise that will allow us to make real progress.”

Staff reporter Vianna Davila contributed to this report. Daniel Beekman: 206-464-2164 or dbeekman@seattletimes.com; on Twitter @dbeekman.




And here I thought that when Seattle passed their $15/hr minimum wage back in 2015 that would have ended or at least severely reduced incidents of homelessness.

Adding a $275 per employee per year tax may result in some Seattle employers either not increasing their employee base within the city boundaries or moving existing worksites to the suburbs.

Fewer jobs will likely result in MORE homelessness.

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Idiots of the world unite!
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2018 12:24 pm 
Offline
Hair in the soap
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:46 am
Posts: 19220
Reputation points: 18052
~>

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Idiots of the world unite!
PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2018 12:31 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2011 3:06 pm
Posts: 11773
Location: inside your worst nightmare
Reputation points: 15595
NefariousKoel wrote:
~>


:P

_________________
Anthro's NSFW Thread


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Idiots of the world unite!
PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2018 2:04 am 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 30852
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
https://hotair.com/archives/2018/05/16/ ... -business/

Quote:
Last Year Seattle Cut Ties With Wells Fargo Over The Dakota Access Pipeline, But No One Else Wanted Their Business

JOHN SEXTONPosted at 7:21 pm on May 16, 2018

It was big news when Seattle’s far-left city council cut ties with Wells Fargo in February 2017. The city became the first in the nation to cut ties with a bank over the bank’s involvement in funding the Dakota Access Pipeline. But today, Seattle reversed course and signed a three-year agreement with Wells Fargo for banking services. Why? No other bank was willing to take their business. From KUOW:

Breaking up is hard — especially if you’re a city trying to break up with a bank.

Especially if the other banks aren’t all that interested in dating you…

The city council resolved to find a new financial institution before ending the Wells Fargo contract at the end of 2018. But this week, City Finance Director Glen Lee gave them an update on the search for a bank.

“The reality is, none wanted to participate and bid for our services, and given the time it takes to shift to a new service, we felt it was prudent for the city to move forward,” Lee said.


To really appreciate how embarrassing this is, you need to look back at the celebration and back-patting that took place last year when the city voted to dump Wells Fargo. Komo News reported there were cheers after the unanimous vote:

The crowd erupted in cheers and chanted “water is life” when the council unanimously passed the measure, which directs officials to end the city’s contract with the San Francisco-based bank once it expires in 2018 and not to make new investments in Wells Fargo securities for three years.

“The example that we have set today can become a beacon of hope” for activists across the country, said Councilmember Kshama Sawant, who co-sponsored the legislation…

“You have been a city setting the example to the world and I look to you to do that now,” Olivia One Feather, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, told the council. “When big cities such as this do the right thing, it sparks hope in the world.”


Councilwoman Sawant, who was so proud of being a “beacon of hope,” is the socialist who led the campaign for Seattle’s head tax and who led the previous campaign for a $15 per hour minimum wage. She’s a real treasure.

To be fair, it probably didn’t help that 11 other major banks were also involved in funding the multi-billion dollar Dakota Access Pipeline, including Bank of America, CitiBank, Chase, etc. Ultimately, there are a limited number of institutions prepared to handle an account like Seattle’s. Maybe they should have thought about that before the vote?

Below is a video of progressives celebrating the big win. If only there was a video of them crawling back to Wells Fargo in desperation. Can you imagine how that meeting went? Um, I know we told you to pound sand and insinuated you were morally offensive as an institution, but can we hire you again?

[video at above link]



:lol:

So last year Seattle goes all virtue signally and cuts ties with Wells Fargo over the Dakota Pipeline...and now they have to come crawling back because NO OTHER BANK IS WILLING/ABLE TO REPLACE THE SERVICES THAT THEY RECEIVED FROM WELLS. :mrgreen:

PS: Seattle hasn't given up completely:
Quote:
In the meantime, city staff are studying the idea of a municipal bank, which Lee said Mayor Jenny Durkan supports. That idea was proposed at the state level in the past, but never gathered steam. City staff want to hire a consultant, possibly in conjunction with other Washington cities, to set up a public bank.

Cities such as San Francisco and L.A. have also considered municipal banking, but only North Dakota and Native American tribes currently have their own banks.

http://kuow.org/post/seattle-wanted-bre ... more-years

I wish them luck.
Once they draw up their list of SJW requirements for their banking institution AND compare those to state & national banking law requirements regarding the creation and running of a bank, they might be in for another disappointment.

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Idiots of the world unite!
PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 4:58 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 30852
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
chijohnaok wrote:
The latest in tax increases in Seattle:

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-ne ... employers/

Quote:
Seattle City Council votes 9-0 for scaled-down head tax on large employers

Originally published May 14, 2018 at 4:17 pm Updated May 14, 2018 at 9:20 pm

The legislation calls for a tax of $275 per employee, per year on for-profit companies that gross at least $20 million per year in the city — down from a $500-per-head tax that Mayor Jenny Durkan had threatened to veto.

By Matt Day and Daniel Beekman
Seattle Times staff reporters

After a weekend of high-stakes negotiations between Seattle City Council members and Mayor Jenny Durkan, the council voted unanimously Monday to tax the city’s largest employers to help address homelessness.

Starting next year, the tax will be $275 per employee, per year on for-profit companies that gross at least $20 million per year in the city — down from a $500-per-head proposal that Durkan threatened to veto.


[SNIP]




And here I thought that when Seattle passed their $15/hr minimum wage back in 2015 that would have ended or at least severely reduced incidents of homelessness.

Adding a $275 per employee per year tax may result in some Seattle employers either not increasing their employee base within the city boundaries or moving existing worksites to the suburbs.

Fewer jobs will likely result in MORE homelessness.



An update on this newly passed tax by the City of Seattle:

Quote:
SEATTLE (AP) -- Seattle city leaders said Monday they will work to repeal a tax on large businesses just one month after unanimously approving the measure to help pay for affordable housing and homeless services.


https://www.yahoo.com/news/seattle-tax- ... 28848.html

:lol:

Idiots.

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Idiots of the world unite!
PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 1:37 pm 
Offline
Hair in the soap
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:46 am
Posts: 19220
Reputation points: 18052
chijohnaok wrote:


An update on this newly passed tax by the City of Seattle:

Quote:
SEATTLE (AP) -- Seattle city leaders said Monday they will work to repeal a tax on large businesses just one month after unanimously approving the measure to help pay for affordable housing and homeless services.


https://www.yahoo.com/news/seattle-tax- ... 28848.html

:lol:

Idiots.


Too bad Yahoo DNC News is so social-authoritarian that they can't bring themselves to confess why it was going to be bad, and is getting overturned.

One of the fakest of the fake media filters. :lol:

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Idiots of the world unite!
PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 8:37 am 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 30852
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
https://www.investors.com/politics/edit ... il-repeal/

Quote:
EDITORIALS

Fight Against $15: Democrats Push To Repeal Minimum Wage Hike In Nation's Capital

Economics: "Fight for $15" is the rallying cry for most Democrats these days. But soon after Washington, D.C., voters approved a hike in tipped wages to $15, Democrats on the city council moved to repeal it. That's what happens when ideology crashes into reality.

On Tuesday, 7 of the 13 members of Washington's city council sponsored a bill to jettison the wage hike for tipped workers that 56% of D.C. voters had approved by a ballot initiative less than a month before.

Under Initiative 77, the workers would see their minimum wage climb from the current $3.89 an hour to $15 an hour by 2026, erasing the difference between tipped and nontipped workers.

Keep in mind that D.C. is about as heavily Democratic as you can get. It went for Hillary Clinton by a 91%-4% margin.

[u]But the D.C. council members came to understand what economists — and D.C. restaurant workers themselves — already know. Sharp increases in the minimum wage will cost lost hours, lost jobs and lost income. (The unemployment rate is over 9% in D.C.'s poorer wards.)

Not only would the wage hike pretty much eliminate tips — why tip when the waiter is already making as much as everyone else? — it would almost certainly make workers who keep their jobs worse off financially, since they'd have to pay taxes on every dollar of income.
[/u]

The problem with the D.C. council's move isn't that it's trying to overturn the will of the people, but that it isn't applying its newfound understanding of economics more widely.

This month, the minimum wage for nontipped workers in D.C. jumped from $12.50 to $13.25 an hour. It will reach $15 an hour in just two years, and then go up every year after that at the rate of inflation.

This wage mandate, just like the one the council is trying to repeal, will also end up hurting the very people it's supposed to help.

That's not speculation. It's what happened in Seattle, which four years ago decided to gradually hike the city's minimum to $15. Researchers from the University of Washington found that the average low-wage worker lost $125 a month as the mandate took effect and employers cut back on hours and jobs.

Other parts of the country are catching on as evidence rolls in of the job-killing side effect of these mandated wage hikes. The mayor of heavily Democratic Baltimore vetoed a minimum-wage bill last year. The city council in Flagstaff, Ariz., decided to scrap the planned hike to $12, and cap it at $10.50.

"Fight for $15" makes a good bumper sticker. But as Democrats are finding out first hand, it makes bad public policy.





One city has realized the foolishness of artificially jacking up the minimum wage.

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Idiots of the world unite!
PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 8:38 am 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 30852
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
https://theintercept.com/2018/07/16/chi ... ncome-ubi/

Quote:
CHICAGO MAY BECOME LARGEST CITY IN U.S. TO TRY UNIVERSAL BASIC INCOME

Zaid Jilani
July 16 2018, 12:00 p.m.

CHICAGO ALDERMAN AMEYA PAWAR is worried about the future.

He is concerned that a coming wave of automation could put millions of people out of work and result in more extreme politics.

Pointing to investments in autonomous vehicles by companies like Tesla, Amazon, and Uber, Pawar observed that long-haul trucking jobs, historically a source of middle-class employment, may become obsolete. More people out of work means more political polarization, says Pawar.”We have to start talking about race and class and geography, but also start talking about the future of work as it relates to automation. All of this stuff is intertwined.”

Before leaving the race after being outspent by two billionaire candidates, Pawar campaigned for the Illinois Democratic Party’s nomination for governor. One of the themes of his candidacy was that politicians were scapegoating various racial or ethnic groups for their constituents’ material problems.

“You know, the British pit Hindus and Muslims against one another,” Pawar told The Intercept at the time, drawing on his Indian-American heritage. “Pit people against one another based on class and geography, caste … this is no different. Chicago versus downstate. Downstate versus Chicago. Black, white, brown against one another. All poor people fighting over scraps.”

Pawar now believes that a wave of mass automation will only compound this problem.

“From a race and class perspective, just know that 66 percent of long-haul truck drivers are middle-aged white men,” he observed. “So if you put them out of work without any investment in new jobs or in a social support system so that they transition from their job to another job, these race and class and geographical divides are going to grow.”

Pawar thinks that one way to battle racial resentment is to address the economic precarity that politicians have used to stoke it. He has decided to endorse the universal basic income — an idea that has been picking up steam across the world.

The UBI is based on a simple premise: People don’t have enough money to provide for their essential needs, so why not just give them more?

UBI schemes entail giving a standard cash grant to everyone — regardless of need. Traditionally, the United States has addressed poverty by delivering in-kind goods. For instance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as the food stamp program, issues electronic cards that can be used to purchase certain types of food.

But some economists have countered that simply giving people money is more beneficial.


Research shows that cash transfer programs are more efficient overall, as they sidestep the administrative costs of distributing in-kind goods. The theory is that people know their own needs and can allocate money more effectively than the government. Moreover, the hope is that because UBI is a universal initiative, it will avoid some of the stigma associated with need-based programs, which have historically been criticized as handouts to the “undeserving” poor.

Pawar recently introduced a pilot for a UBI program in Chicago. Under his program, $500 a month would be delivered to 1,000 Chicago families — no strings attached. Additionally, the proposal would modify the Earned Income Tax Credit program for the same 1,000 families, so they’d receive payments on a monthly basis instead at the end of the year — a process known as “smoothing” that enables families to integrate the tax credit into their monthly budgets.

The proposal also leaves room for the creation of a Chicago-specific EITC program.

Pawar has convinced the majority of Chicago lawmakers to co-sponsor the plan, and he is hoping that the Chicago City Council will soon work with the mayor to implement it.

“Nearly 70 percent of Americans don’t have $1,000 in the bank for an emergency,” Pawar told The Intercept. “UBI could be an incredible benefit for people who are working and are having a tough time making ends meet or putting food on the table at the end of the month. … It’s time to start thinking about direct cash transfers to people so that they can start making plans about how they’re going to get by.”

SIMPLY GIVING PEOPLE money so they can cover their expenses seems like a radical idea — especially in America, where individualism and personal responsibility are considered chief virtues, and the notion of getting something for nothing is scorned. But there’s an easy rejoinder — at least to those skeptics who doubt UBI because they think the money will be squandered on nonessential goods. UBI-style direct cash transfers have been implemented elsewhere. And they work.

One of the most effective anti-poverty programs in the 21st century is Brazil’s Programa Bolsa Familia. Deborah Wetzel, a senior staffer at the World Bank, called the program a “quiet revolution,” noting that PBF “has been key to help Brazil more than halve its extreme poverty — from 9.7 to 4.3 percent of the population.” Moreover, the program also helped to shrink income inequality by about 15 percent, says Wetzel. One study by the Inter-American Development Bank noted that the program cost about 0.5 percent of the gross domestic product of Brazil, but was credited with reducing the infant mortality rate caused by undernourishment and diarrhea by more than 50 percent.

PBF is not a universal program, as payments go only to Brazilians living below a certain wage threshold. (In 2013, about one quarter of Brazilians received this benefit). Another key difference is that unlike PBF, which requires that children of recipient families attend school and regularly visit the doctor, UBI is unconditional. But PBF is a useful model for UBI, as both are direct cash transfer programs.

The best domestic example of UBI can be found in Alaska. Since 1976, Alaska’s state government has maintained the Alaska Permanent Fund, which invests in financial assets like public and private equities, real estate, and infrastructure to generate revenues for the state government. The fund, which is also fed by residuals on oil from public lands, then issues a check every year to every resident of Alaska. In 2017, that payment amounted to $1,100.

Back in the continental United States, the 27-year-old mayor of Stockton, California, Michael Tubbs, started rolling out a local UBI pilot program earlier this year. The Stockton program, which is being implemented in partnership with Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes’s Economic Security Project, will provide $500 monthly to 100 families. The 18-month study will start in 2019.

In an interview with Politico, Tubbs rejected the argument that paying people for doing nothing is inherently undignified.

“There’s this interesting conversation we’ve been having about the value of work,” he said. “Work does have some value and some dignity, but I don’t think working 14 hours and not being able to pay your bills, or working two jobs and not being able — there’s nothing inherently dignified about that.”

If Pawar’s program is implemented by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, Chicago would be the largest city in America to experiment with UBI. Matt Bruenig, the founder of the People’s Policy Project and a UBI advocate, is skeptical that a municipality can run a successful UBI because cities tend to have limited capacity to collect revenue. However, he does think that the pilot project has merit.

“This looks like a UBI pilot program, which is a good idea, just to study its effects and produce data that can help guide other UBI efforts,” he told The Intercept.

“Our hope, that I know will be born out in this pilot, is that it will show that when we smooth out the EITC, and we provide a monthly basic income to 1,000 families, that they will be able to plan for expenses, they can make decisions about savings, they can make decisions about investing, they could make decisions about how they could deal with a financial emergency, just like all families do,” Pawar told us. “And once implemented, we’ll be able to hopefully scale it.”

To the alderman, the question is not so much whether the country can afford to implement UBI so much as whether it can afford not to.

“My response to Amazon, and Tesla, and Ford, and Uber … we need to start having a conversation about automation and a regulatory framework so that if jobs simply go away, what are we going to do with the workforce? … If [those companies are] reticent to pay their fair share in taxes and still want tax incentives and at the same time automate jobs, what do you think is going to happen?” Pawar asked. “These divisions are going to grow and, in many ways, we’re sitting on a powder keg.”




While another city is ready to start handing out money for doing nothing.

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Idiots of the world unite!
PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 11:12 am 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 30852
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
https://www.dailywire.com/news/34771/oc ... n-saavedra

Quote:
Ocasio-Cortez Visits Former Employer. They Just Went Out Of Business Because Of Policies She Supports.

ByRYAN SAAVEDRA
@REALSAAVEDRA
August 20, 2018

ocialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez visited a restaurant that she used to work at in New York City on Monday on its final day in business, closing largely because of policies supported by the 28-year-old bartender-turned-politician.

Ocasio-Cortez's former employer, The Coffee Shop in Union Square, has shut down after a 28-year run due to high rent and an ever-increasing minimum wage — a policy that Ocasio-Cortez strongly supports.

"The restaurant I used to work at is closing its doors," Ocasio-Cortez wrote on Twitter. "I swung by today to say hi one last time, and kid around with friends like old times."


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

@Ocasio2018

US House candidate, NY-14
The restaurant I used to work at is closing its doors.

I swung by today to say hi one last time, and kid around with friends like old times.

I’m a normal, working person who chose to run for office, because I believe we can have a better future.

You can do it too. We all can.

1:42 PM - Aug 20, 2018


"The rents are very high and now the minimum wage is going up and we have a huge number of employees," The Coffee Shop co-owner and president Charles Milite said in a July interview with the New York Post. "The times have changed in our industry."

The restaurant employed 150 workers who now are without a job, but that didn't stop Ocasio-Cortez from making the event about herself.

"I’m a normal, working person who chose to run for office, because I believe we can have a better future," Ocasio-Cortez added on Twitter. "You can do it too. We all can."

Increasing the national minimum wage has been one of the issues that Ocasio-Cortez has been most vocal about, despite the fact that it does not work and it actually hurts the economy.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

@Ocasio2018

US House candidate, NY-14
Replying to @Ocasio2018
Raising the Federal minimum wage to a living wage, and supporting a revitalized, 21st century labor movement are two essential starting points for working class Americans getting the dignified pay they deserve.

Healthcare, education, and housing are key cornerstones, too.

6:25 PM - Jul 17, 2018


Michael Saltsman of the Employment Policies Institute told the Free Beacon that leftist politicians are to blame for businesses like The Coffee Shop closing their doors.

"Ocasio-Cortez's desired 'living wage' of $15 an hour has been a living hell for many small business owners in New York, who've been unable to offset the cost through higher prices," Saltsman said. "It's fine to mourn the impending closure of your former employer—it's better to understand the misguided minimum-wage mandates that contributed to that closure."

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Idiots of the world unite!
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 8:18 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 30852
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
Off topic to the initial post in this thread, but the title thread aptly describes this gentleman:


Quote:
Las Vegas Professor shot himself in arm to protest Trump

A longtime College of Southern Nevada sociology professor is facing felony gun charges in connection with an on-campus shooting on the second day of classes.

Mark J. Bird, 69, was charged last month with discharging a gun within a prohibited structure, carrying a concealed weapon without a permit and possessing a dangerous weapon on school property, court records show. He was found bleeding from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to his arm about 8:15 a.m. on Aug. 28 outside a bathroom in the Charleston campus K building.

Inside the bathroom, campus police found a $100 bill taped to a mirror along with a note that said, “For the janitor,” according to Bird’s arrest report. On the floor of the restroom was a black-and-white, .22-caliber pistol and one spent shell casing.



Continued at link below:

https://www.reviewjournal.com/crime/sho ... est-trump/

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 151 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 12, 13, 14, 15, 16  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group