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 Post subject: Soylent green is people
PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 2:11 pm 
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https://summit.news/2019/09/04/swedish- ... he-planet/

Quote:
Swedish Behavioral Scientist Suggests Eating Humans to ‘Save the Planet’

The “food of the future” may be dead bodies.

Published 2 days ago on 4 September, 2019
Paul Joseph Watson

A Swedish behavioral scientist has suggested that it may be necessary to turn to cannibalism and start eating humans in order to save the planet.

Appearing on Swedish television to talk about an event based around the “food of the future,” Magnus Söderlund said he would be holding seminars on the necessity of consuming human flesh in order to stop climate change.

Environmentalists blame the meat and farming industry for a large part of what they claim is the warming of the earth.

According to Söderlund, a potential fix would be the Soylent Green-solution of eating dead bodies instead.

He told the host of the show that one of the biggest obstacles to the proposal would be the taboo nature of corpses and the fact that many would see it as defiling the deceased.

Söderlund also acknowledged that people are “slightly conservative” when it comes to eating things they are not accustomed to, such as cadavers.

The discussion took place accompanied by a graphic of human hands on the end of forks. Lovely.

Another proposal to save the earth which has been promoted by numerous mass media outlets and environmentalists is only somewhat less disgusting – eating bugs.

No doubt Greta Thunberg and Prince Harry will be first in line for when cockroaches and human flesh is being dished out at the next international climate summit.





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 Post subject: Re: Soylent green is people
PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 2:43 pm 
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Right I thought "soy lent green" was people getting er "recycled" into sub-components ... right ??

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 Post subject: Re: Soylent green is people
PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2019 2:58 pm 
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So to the save the planet we all have to start eating long pig now do we? Alright. I guess it will make a change from eating bugs.

Quote:
Edible insects come in all shapes and sizes. Ants that burst with honey as you bite into them. Giant hornet pupae that melt like cream on your tongue. Beetle larvae that leave a smoky taste in your mouth. And those are just the ones that can be eaten raw.

Humans have relied on a partially insectivorous diet for millennia. We evolved as insect-eaters. In many food cultures worldwide, insects are a prized delicacy, and reach higher prices than meat. They are eaten in tacos, in bowls of rice and sandwiches. They fit well with many common dishes.

Yet today’s dominant global food culture does not embrace insects. Disgust, apprehension and charged curiosity are all common reactions. Media coverage tends to reflect this, with echoes of the excitement of taboo: never quite certain

So why is it that right now, edible insects are seeing a surge in interest?

As dinner party treats go, they’re quite the talking point. Serve delicately simmered wasp larvae to your guests and they’ll be buzzing about it for months. Or follow Angelina Jolie’s advice. She told us last year that “you start with crickets and a beer”, a tempting invitation that did a great deal for the public image of edible insects. Justin Timberlake has also hopped on board. He served “ants coated in black garlic and rose oil and grasshoppers” at his latest album launch.

But there’s more to this than celebrity endorsement: we are told edible insects might save us from ourselves. We’re living in a world that we’ve destabilised: sea levels are rising, global temperatures are soaring, biodiversity is declining, and inequality is deepening.

Edible insects are hoped to be a turning point in this sombre storyline, because of their role in challenging the meat industry. The farming and processing of animal livestock is destroying wild nature and releasing thousands of tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere. It’s expanding daily, all to feed a population that is growing in number, in size, and in desire for meat.

The edible insect industry might provide an environmentally sound alternative. Insect farmers aren’t quite big enough to compete with the meaty conglomerates just yet but they’re trying. Businesses that have started to farm and sell insects as food claim their environmental footprint is relatively negligible, and that lean insect protein is a healthier choice for the consumer.

It’s not entirely clear how reliable these claims are. Crickets, the most commonly farmed insects, have a smaller environmental footprint than beef. But when fed with poultry feed and kept alive with the help of an energy-intensive heating system, their environmental footprint may be on a par with chicken. Insects certainly need less feed to grow compared to hot-blooded livestock, so they do take up less space on the planet. This is imperative right now: agricultural expansion is causing staggering losses of biodiversity, and experts believe we need to preserve half of the world’s ecosystems for a sustainable future.

Dennis Oonincx is an entomologist based at the University of Wageningen in Holland – an expert in edible insects and sustainability.

He argues all animal production systems “add inefficiency” because they are converting plant matter into animal matter – the answer is to take out the middle man (or cow). From an environmental perspective, Oonincx concedes, plant-based food might be the best option. This is because “plants that can be consumed directly are best used as food instead of feed for insects”.

Plants! Plants are notoriously healthy. Could it be that underneath the hype, edible insects are just another version of meat, mellowed and rebranded for the credulous consumer? If so, perhaps we should forget the critters and just eat more plants.

But there’s another angle to the insects-as-food movement, which may be even more important in today’s climate. Insects have traditionally been collected, prepared and sold by people who hold little economic or political power. Commoditising insects as food may contribute significantly to the livelihoods of some of the world’s most marginalised communities. Can we – as literate and relatively wealthy consumers – contribute to a fairer world by promoting and purchasing edible insects?

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/long ... 59991.html

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 Post subject: Re: Soylent green is people
PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 5:18 pm 
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reminds me of monty python skit where they're in a lifeboat arguing about who to eat first regarding who'd be the tastiest.

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 Post subject: Re: Soylent green is people
PostPosted: Mon Sep 09, 2019 6:27 pm 
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Swedish nutjob seems to have left out some of the details... like why people rather than, for example, tofu, would be on the menu.

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 Post subject: Re: Soylent green is people
PostPosted: Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:22 pm 
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Quote:
Nearly a third of Britons believe insects will eventually be part of mainstream human diets in the UK amid mounting challenges in food production, new research reveals.

With UK farmers facing pressure from the climate crisis, pests and plant diseases – alongside the need to boost productivity and compete with imports – research released on Monday claims that 32% of British adults think that regularly tucking into cricket snacks and buffalo worm burgers will become commonplace within 10 years.

The research from the Agricultural Biotechnology Council (ABC), an industry group promoting the use of controversial genetically modified (GM) crops in the UK, also suggests that 72% of people support increased emphasis on technology, such as new plant breeding techniques including gene editing, to tackle crop shortages.

Manufacturers, supermarkets and restaurants are all scrambling to cash in on a changing food landscape in the UK as consumers embrace flexitarian diets – where a largely vegetable-based diet is occasionally supplemented with meat – and experiment with meat alternatives and plant-based eating.

The damaging environmental impact of global meat production has spurred interest in edible bugs as an alternative, sustainable food source. Unlike cows or pigs, insects can be bred in significant numbers without taking up large amounts of land, water or feed.

Insects are also nutritious, containing essential proteins, fats, minerals and amino acids. Bugs for consumption are typically bred in large-scale factory conditions.

In the new YouGov poll of 2,093 adults, nearly two in five (37%) of respondents said they thought the consumption of insects would increase in the next 10 years, rising to nearly half (48%) among the 18-24-year-old age group.

Mark Buckingham, chair of the ABC, said: “We are delighted to see UK consumers embrace innovation as the future of farming. Using cutting-edge technology and growing techniques will enable the UK to deal with the serious challenges of keeping our farmers competitive, maintaining a safe, affordable food supply, and protecting our natural environment.”

The global edible insect market is set to exceed $520m (£430m) by 2023, according to recent research. The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation says at least 2 billion people regularly consume insects. But while more than 1,000 species are eaten around the world, they hardly feature in the diets of many rich nations.

In the UK, crickets and other insects have so far been predominantly limited to quirky pop-ups or sales through online outlets, while they also feature on a few restaurant menus.

Last November, Sainsbury’s became the first major UK grocer to stock edible crickets, selling the roasted insects as snacks in small bags from the UK brand Eat Grub in 250 of its stores.

Helen Browning, chief executive of the organic food and farming group the Soil Association, said: “Insects can be used to convert waste food very efficiently and there are a few large ‘insect farms’ now established across the world, targeted at animal and fish diets.

“There is clearly interest in insects for humans too, but how quickly these markets will develop remains to be seen. For many people in the UK, there is a bit of a ‘yuck’ factor, though of course in many cultures they are a normal part of the diet.”

https://www.theguardian.com/food/2019/s ... ts-by-2029

You will eat the bugs. YOU WILL.

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I could be the catalyst that sparks the revolution
I could be an inmate in a long-term institution
I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die
I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by
What a waste...


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