Windrush Scandal 2: Electric Boogaloo

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Mac
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Windrush Scandal 2: Electric Boogaloo

#1 Post by Mac » Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:18 pm

Expect this time the Home Office actually got it right. If you are not familiar with what the Windrush scandal is you can find the details here...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windrush_scandal

So 17 Jamaican foreign nationals who served time in prison here for crimes ranging from rape to manslaughter got kicked out of the country and sent back home after being released from jail. And of course the BBC are crying crocodile tears over it...
Jamaica deportation: 'I feel I was punished twice when I was deported'

Amid controversy and protests, 17 convicted offenders - many of them living in the UK since childhood - were deported to Jamaica. BBC Newsnight has been following their stories.

"If somebody commits a crime and they went to prison for it, and they've been rehabilitated, why would you punish them again by deporting them to Jamaica?" says Rayan Crawford.

Mr Crawford had not set foot in Jamaica since he was 12 years old, he says. Now 34, he is living there at the house of his sister Yanique after being deported from the UK.

Back home in Bow, east London, he has a partner of 14 years, Jana, as well as two boys aged three and 12.

He served 12 months in prison after he was convicted of burglary in 2017. Then, on 27 January, 10 officials detained him at his home.

He and 16 others were flown out of the UK on Monday, designated as "serious foreign national offenders" by the government.

The Home Office said those detained included people convicted of manslaughter and rape, and all of them had their cases "fully reviewed" to ensure there were no legal barriers to their removal.

It said Mr Crawford was convicted 10 times for a total of 22 offences, including the burglary.

"We make no apology whatsoever for seeking to remove dangerous foreign criminals," a spokesman said.

But Mr Crawford says his deportation did not make anyone safer. "I regret what I've done, but I don't think I'm a danger to the public," he says.

MPs and campaigners said the government was risking another Windrush scandal, in which the children of Commonwealth citizens were threatened with deportation despite living in the UK for decades.

A leaked report into the scandal, revealed by Newsnight last week, recommended that the UK stop deporting people who had arrived in the UK as children or reserve deportation for the most serious cases.

Under both of these tests it would be unlikely that Rayan Crawford would be eligible for deportation.

Mr Crawford says he voted for Boris Johnson and thought he was going to be a good prime minister, but believes the law around deportation needs to be re-examined.

"I feel British," he says. "I've been there from a child. I went to school there, I went to college there. I spent my whole life there."

His belongings are still in the UK, he adds, with a plastic bag containing two pairs of jeans being all he could bring with him.

Mr Crawford, who has inflammatory arthritis and the bone disorder Blount's disease, says he was also made to leave without his medication.

He says officials told him if he did not have the medication for his arthritis with him when he was detained, they could not give it to him.

"I thought I was going to have a heart attack, I was panicking so much I started getting pain in my chest. Even on the plane I was crying. My back was killing me so much I was crying."

The Home Office said individuals were assessed to establish they were medically fit to fly.

It said they travelled on the removal flights with their medical notes and those with pre-existing conditions were brought to the attention of accompanying medical staff.

Mr Crawford believes the medication he needs is not available in Jamaica. He adds that he had been told in detention he could not access the medication without doctors' reports.

Now he does not know what the future holds.

"There's nothing around here to do. There's no work to do or anything. Even finding somewhere to stay - I don't know how long I can stay here. Where am I going to go from here?"

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-51497358
Sargon has a good video covering this story.



And as for David Lammy and his race baiting shit, well mate if you don't like it...

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I could be the catalyst that sparks the revolution
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I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die
I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by
What a waste...

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Re: Windrush Scandal 2: Electric Boogaloo

#2 Post by Anthropoid » Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:29 pm

I seem to recall there is a long history of Jamaican's behaving badly and then trying to blame their malfeasance on British racism, no? Wasn't there a LOT of violence and unrest in either the 1970s or 1980s around that theme?

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Re: Windrush Scandal 2: Electric Boogaloo

#3 Post by chijohnaok » Thu Feb 13, 2020 10:00 pm

But Mr Crawford says his deportation did not make anyone safer. "I regret what I've done, but I don't think I'm a danger to the public," he says.
Crawford: ‘I’ve certainly learned my lesson after being convicted 10 times for the 22 crimes that I committed. I promise, you can trust me!’
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Re: Windrush Scandal 2: Electric Boogaloo

#4 Post by nero » Fri Feb 14, 2020 4:13 am

Anthropoid wrote:
Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:29 pm
...British racism...


Sounds familiar. ;)
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Mac
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Re: Windrush Scandal 2: Electric Boogaloo

#5 Post by Mac » Fri Feb 14, 2020 9:16 am

Anthropoid wrote:
Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:29 pm
I seem to recall there is a long history of Jamaican's behaving badly and then trying to blame their malfeasance on British racism, no? Wasn't there a LOT of violence and unrest in either the 1970s or 1980s around that theme?
It was the early 80's when it really kicked off, with riots in areas with substantial African-Caribbean populations, St Pauls in 1980, Brixton, Toxteth and Moss Side in 1981, St Pauls again in 1982, Notting Hill Gate in 1982, Toxteth in 1982, and Handsworth, Brixton and Tottenham in 1985,
I could be the catalyst that sparks the revolution
I could be an inmate in a long-term institution
I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die
I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by
What a waste...

Anthropoid
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Posts: 16742
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Re: Windrush Scandal 2: Electric Boogaloo

#6 Post by Anthropoid » Fri Feb 14, 2020 9:22 am

Mac wrote:
Fri Feb 14, 2020 9:16 am
Anthropoid wrote:
Thu Feb 13, 2020 9:29 pm
I seem to recall there is a long history of Jamaican's behaving badly and then trying to blame their malfeasance on British racism, no? Wasn't there a LOT of violence and unrest in either the 1970s or 1980s around that theme?
It was the early 80's when it really kicked off, with riots in areas with substantial African-Caribbean populations, St Pauls in 1980, Brixton, Toxteth and Moss Side in 1981, St Pauls again in 1982, Notting Hill Gate in 1982, Toxteth in 1982, and Handsworth, Brixton and Tottenham in 1985,
Meanwhile the Sikhs, the East Indians, the Tswana, and probably many other expatriate or ethnic minority communities of melanin enhancement have been living in non-trivial numbers in the British Isles for decades, centuries even, and not a peep . . . Kind've lends credence that the actual causal source of any antipathy which Anglos feel toward Jamaicans in particular has more to do with their cultural characteristics than with their wealth in melanin and other posh tropical phenotypic features. :D

Dark skinned person with kinky hair, wide-nostrils and large lips acting civilized, polite, pro-social and helpful: Ah! Welcome mate!
Dark skinned person with kinky hair, wide-nostrils and large lips acting like a goddamned entitled savage, selling drugs, robbing shops, stealing cars and murdering: Argh! Walk the fucking plank matey!

Mac
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Re: Windrush Scandal 2: Electric Boogaloo

#7 Post by Mac » Fri Feb 14, 2020 12:04 pm

To be fair, there was shit going on with both sides back in those days. The African-Caribbean communities suffered from poor housing, unemployment and poverty and were plagued with high crime rates. The police had a contentious stop and search policy that targeted blacks. Also back then the police weren't the touchy feely snowflakes they are today, if they thought you were a trouble maker they weren't beyond grabbing you off the street, throwing you in the back of a Black Maria van and giving you a kicking before dumping you back on the street again. That actually happened to a guy I knew and he was white.
I could be the catalyst that sparks the revolution
I could be an inmate in a long-term institution
I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die
I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by
What a waste...

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