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 Post subject: Re: South Africa
PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2018 11:29 pm 
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Zimbabwe Part Deux . . .

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 4:19 am 
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 Post subject: Re: South Africa
PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 5:07 pm 
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https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/20 ... zures.html

Quote:
October 13, 2018

Zulu king backs South African white farmers against land seizures

By Thomas Lifson

South Africa's ruling party, the African National Congress, is taking steps to change that nation's constitution and permit the seizure without compensation of land owned by white farmers. Notably, the leftists at the Southern Poverty Law Center demand that we avert our eyes from this situation because "white genocide" is a "dangerous myth." But there is already an ongoing epidemic of murder of white farmers. Statistics gathered by the private civil rights group AfriForum show this trend:

Image

The current constitutional measure would institutionalize the process of forced land transfer – in a less bloody manner, it is to be hoped.


The leader of the Zulu tribe, King Goodwill Zwelithini, chooses to ignore the SPLC (maybe he's a dangerous racist in their book?) and warn of the dangers of this policy, apparently because he has noticed that after neighboring Zimbabwe enacted a similar measure, people starved.



Of course, major U.S. media are consigning this story to the memory hole, so we must go to overseas news outlets to find out. From News.com.au, the Murdoch empire's operation Down Under:

SUPPORT for white South African farmers has arrived from unexpected quarters after Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini rejected President Cyril Ramaphosa's plans to expropriate land without compensation.

Saying he wished to form a partnership with AfriForum, the Pretoria-based organisation fighting to save farming land and draw attention to the murder of white farmers, King Zwelithini said the Zulu nation needed food security.

"I'm asking AfriForum of the Boers to come and help us, as they've introduced themselves to me that they are willing to work with me and my father's people to uplift agriculture in our land in order to have food," the King told a crowd in Durban.


Just as with Kanye West, the king's abandonment of racialist orthodoxy has led to social media attacks on him. And to be sure, his position is mainly ceremonial, though according to many observers, he carries a lot of prestige among the 12 million Zulus of South Africa. And according to Reuters, "King Goodwill Zwelithini controls 2.8 million hectares, a fragmented sub-tropical area the size of Belgium, under an entity called the Ingonyama Trust."

Meanwhile, the carnage continues:

AfriForum has so far recorded 343 farm attacks and 45 farm murders for 2018.

King Zwelithini does not want his tribesmen and women to starve. For that pragmatism, he is being excoriated.

Hat tip: John McMahon

Photo credit: Reinhardt Hartzenberg.

South Africa's ruling party, the African National Congress, is taking steps to change that nation's constitution and permit the seizure without compensation of land owned by white farmers. Notably, the leftists at the Southern Poverty Law Center demand that we avert our eyes from this situation because "white genocide" is a "dangerous myth." But there is already an ongoing epidemic of murder of white farmers. Statistics gathered by the private civil rights group AfriForum show this trend:



Read more: https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/20 ... z5TqaOPmzA
Follow us: @AmericanThinker on Twitter | AmericanThinker on Facebook



I wonder if King Zwelithini can run for office?
He seems to have more sense than some of those in the ruling party.

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2018 1:42 pm 
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https://apnews.com/550d2a368f094eccb15d20276eabfc21

Quote:
South African city set to seize land in national ‘test case’

By KRISTA MAHR
today

EKURHULENI, South Africa (AP) — As South Africa’s passionate debate over land redistribution grows, one city outside Johannesburg is preparing what the mayor calls a “test case” for the nation — the seizure of hundreds of acres of land from private owners, without paying for it, to build low-cost housing.

Like other South African cities, Ekurhuleni faces a dire housing crunch, with some 600,000 of its nearly 4 million people living in “informal settlements” and a shortage of land to build homes.


Last month, Ekurhuleni’s city council voted in favor of forging ahead with “expropriation without compensation,” a legal tool that the ruling African National Congress says is necessary to correct the historic injustices of apartheid and distribute land more equitably.

Nearly a quarter-century after the end of white-minority rule, white South Africans comprise just 8 percent of the population but still hold most of the individually owned private land, keeping most economic power in the hands of a few and making the country one of the most unequal societies in the world.

In July, President Cyril Ramaphosa said the ANC planned to amend the constitution to allow for expropriation without compensation, sparking concerns that the move could destabilize the fragile economy and spur conflict in an already socially divided nation.

In August, President Donald Trump waded into the controversy by tweeting - incorrectly - that South Africa had begun seizing farms and that high numbers of farmers were being killed.

The ANC has sought to reassure people inside and outside the country that its efforts to ensure the majority of black South Africans have better access to land - a long-standing party promise - will be legal and should not be cause for alarm. Ramaphosa has said everyone should “relax” about the land reform process and that it would “end up very well.”

Ekurhuleni’s Executive Mayor Mzwandile Masina, who heads the local ANC-led coalition, echoed the president, saying landowners in South Africa don’t need to be “scared.”

“Our policy is not to take the land by force,” Masina told The Associated Press. “Our policy is to make sure the land is shared amongst those that need it.”

Ekurhuleni plans to expropriate about 865 acres (350 hectares) of land in the city limits, both private and government-owned, that has been vacant for decades and develop it to relieve pressure in vast tracts of ramshackle dwellings. The mayor did not identify the landowners.


The conditions in these settlements are “horrible for human beings,” Masina said. “We are not going to expropriate land and keep it for ourselves.”

He expects the city to be taken to court once it notifies landowners of its intent to seize their property - and that is the point, he says.

The municipality wants the case to force a ruling on whether expropriating land in the public interest is legal as the nation’s laws stand, or whether the constitution needs to be amended.

Whether the court case will pan out favorably for the city is unclear.

“You can’t guarantee the outcome,” said Ben Cousins, research chair in poverty, land and agrarian studies at the University of Western Cape. “The court may find you do have to pay some level of compensation. It could backfire quite badly.”

The move has already put Masina’s political life on the line. The opposition Democratic Alliance party has tabled a motion of no confidence in the mayor for Oct. 25.

Though South Africa’s land reform debate is often focused on farmland, the demand for urban land is intense, particularly in the economic hub of Gauteng province, which includes Johannesburg.

The Ekurhuleni test case is part of a new push in Gauteng to “release” land to residents every week, giving parcels to people who need it for homes or businesses.

Dikgang Uhuru Moiloa, head of the provincial department of Human Settlements, says the government is starting the program by redistributing state-owned land but is also looking at privately owned land that is not being used, as is the case in Ekurhuleni.

“We have to be very rational,” Moiloa said. “We can’t just chase people out of land, their livelihoods, and providing food for the nation. We can’t do that. Those that use the land effectively definitely will have to be left to use the land effectively.”

In the meantime, there are more than 1.2 million people registered and waiting for government-subsidized housing in the province, and the government can only provide 26,000 homes a year. “It’s a huge backlog,” Moiloa said.

In Ekurhuleni’s Winnie Mandela Informal Settlement, a sprawling complex of tiny homes pieced together with cement blocks, plywood and corrugated tin, more than 11,000 people registered for government housing in the late 1990s and many are still waiting to get it.

The mayor says the city has invested “a substantial amount of money” to improve living conditions, installing electricity and building schools.

But some say they feel left in the dark about their future.

Somsy Matso, a community leader in the housing fight, lives in a small complex of shacks that his mother first occupied in 1994. She applied and was approved for a government house, Matso said, but it has yet to materialize.

“The (city officials) are just quiet,” Matso said. “They are not saying anything.”

___

Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa




Quote:
“Our policy is not to take the land by force,” Masina told The Associated Press. “Our policy is to make sure the land is shared amongst those that need it.”


This mayor seems to think that the 2nd part of his quote (“Our policy is to make sure the land is shared amongst those that need it.”) somehow seems to negate that the land was not being taken by force.

Quote:
He expects the city to be taken to court once it notifies landowners of its intent to seize their property - and that is the point, he says.


This guy wants to justify shifting the burden ( and probably changing the law) in the eminent domain process.
Rather than filing a suit of eminent domain/condemnation and then attempting to justify their reasons why in court, he simply wants to seize the land first and then place the burden on the landowner to go to court and fight the seizure.

If you were to apply that to criminal law the government would be imprisoning people on a suspicion for having committed a crime and then saying "well you can go to court and prove your innocence if you want to get out of jail".

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 12:02 pm 
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https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/world- ... nal-change

Quote:
South Africa white farmer land grabs will be LAW after change to constitution approved

SOUTH Africa is gearing up to carry out a controversial land redistribution after plans to change the country’s constitution were approved.


By Rachel O'Donoghue / Published 17th November 2018

[News video at above link]

After months of talks, the country is set to go ahead with the proposals that will see farms seized without compensation – something critics have said will be devastating.

The country’s president, Cyril Ramaphosa, has been attempting to amend South Africa’s constitution for months, but has been met with stiff opposition.

But now the controversial seizures will become legal after the changes were approved by a parliamentary review committee.

"South Africans have spoken loud and clear, and we listened to their cry," said Lewis Nzimande, the co-chair of the committee.

Critics of the plans have previously warned the land seizures will lead to mass starvation and riots.

Ian Cameron, of South African trade group AfriForum, previously warned: “We’re really heading for a state of anarchy if something doesn’t change drastically.

“I’m convinced this year we’ll see between 21,000 to 22,000 people having been murdered in the past year.”

[news video at above link]

And shortly after the decision was announced, AfriForum said the “large-scale damage” it will cause will be off the scale.

South Africa’s oppositions have also blasted the move, saying it was done for political reasons.

They said in a joint statement: "The vote on expropriation without compensation allows government the perfect cover to avoid having to explain their rank failure over the past two decades to take land reform seriously.

“The opposition does not oppose land reform, we oppose the amendment of the Constitution."


The ANC spokesman assures that the land seizures will be targeted, only going after underutilized farmland.

I predict that once seizures start, even if ANC sticks to its promises, you will see things start to unravel.

Farmers will not plant for the next season as that will require either loans, or use of capital to fund those plantings. If the farmer thinks that his land will be seized without compensation during the growing season, then why would he take the financial risk to plant?

I have heard/read that when the farmer's land is seized, they are still being held responsible for the mortgages/loans on that land.
Those land owners/farmers will sell their land (if they can find a buyer) and may walk away if they cannot. They will gather what assets they can liquidate and move to a country with better opportunities.

This would have a HUGE impact on crops and food reduction and could/would then lead to potential food shortages.

When all those farmers with the knowledge/expertise/experience walk away, will the new landowners have the knowledge/expertise, and most importantly the resources(money) to produce on that land?

If (or rather when) there are land seizures without compensation, will this have a snowball effect, triggering more white farmers to liquidate their holdings and leave the country?

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 5:25 pm 
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After posting the above article I reached out again to the South African guy @ DISCORD that I posted about on 22 Jul 2018 (scroll back to page 5 of this thread).

I received a reply from him several hours later.

He informs me that he and his family left South Africa and have relocated to Namibia.
He started a new company there and is trying to get his life back on track.

Some of his parting comments include:
so hopefully things work out for the rest of the people there. but they can burn it to the ground for all i care. when they all die of starvation and shit nd the economy is fucked like zimbabwe


:shock: :lol:

I get the impression that he is never looking back...

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa
PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 11:56 am 
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Wow, moved to Namibia!? :shock:

I haven't kept up I guess, but last I knew Namibia was pretty hard core authoritarian government; granted, they showed some signs of going in the direction that Vietnam went in the late 1970s and 1980s: a self-reforming gradual entrant into the global capitalist market, but I'm surprised that white folks are any less disenfranchised there than in RSA.

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa
PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 1:59 pm 
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Anthropoid wrote:
Wow, moved to Namibia!? :shock:

I haven't kept up I guess, but last I knew Namibia was pretty hard core authoritarian government; granted, they showed some signs of going in the direction that Vietnam went in the late 1970s and 1980s: a self-reforming gradual entrant into the global capitalist market, but I'm surprised that white folks are any less disenfranchised there than in RSA.



IIRC from my chats with him last summer, he seemed pretty determined on getting out ASAP. I think that he had some rural property that had just been broken into. So (and this is my speculation, not something that I recall him saying), maybe Namibia was the first country that offered him an exit route. Furthermore (again, my speculation) since he is building up a business there now, I presume that the conditions in Namibia have given him confidence that he and his family have a future there.

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa
PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 2:06 pm 
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Additionally, from my prior reading on Namibia, there is a small ethnic German population there, perhaps some 30,000. They are the descendants of Germans that lived there when Germany ruled Namibia as a colony (which ended roughly 100 years ago).

I would presume that the majority of this group are in the upper echelon of Namibians(from an economic standpoint).

Maybe there is some resentment against them, but if I am not mistaken, German is still an official language in Namibia.

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 Post subject: Re: South Africa
PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 11:35 pm 
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What would happen to the US if we tuned it over to the Blacks?

Or even the Latins, it needs the European tradition our ancestors gave us. Not the tradition of Rousseau and his ilk, rather the Burke tradition;
Reactionary Prophet
viewtopic.php?f=7&t=20180&hilit=burke

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