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 Post subject: Re: This Week In Obvious Science
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 12:03 pm 
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Scientists discover that women and gays are more attracted to healthy rich men. Well stop the fucking presses...

Quote:
Muscles and money are qualities that straight women and gay men typically find attractive in men, according to an analysis of Tube Crush—a website where people post unsolicited pictures of men seen on the London Underground.

The study at Coventry and Aberystwyth universities in the United Kingdom, published in Feminist Media Studies in August, analyzed images over a period of three years since 2014. The “guy candy” posted on the website were mostly white men—despite London being a multicultural city—indicating that white male privilege is still an attractive quality.

The photos and comments focused on the men’s biceps, pecs and chest as well as perceived sexual ability. Items that indicated wealth such as smart suits, watches and phones were emphasized. Pictures showing other representations of masculinity, such as fatherhood, and more emotional and awkward-appearing men were far less frequent.

“This celebration of masculine capital is achieved through humor and the knowing wink, but the outcome is a reaffirmation of men’s position in society,” lead author Adrienne Evans from the Coventry University’s Centre for Postdigital Cultures said in a statement. The problem, according to Evans, is that “although it appears as though we have moved forward, our desires are still mostly about money and strength.”

Through social media, once-private desires are being made public. Taking photos of men on the London Underground can also be seen as reversal of gender roles, since men have historically been able to have more power over women’s bodies.

“From smart-suited city workers to toned gym-goers flashing their flesh,” Evans said in a statement, “the men featured in the photographs on Tube Crush show that as a culture we still celebrate masculinity in the form of money and muscle.”

Public transport has become a place where gender politics is decided, according to the authors.

New York City has its own version of Tube Crush on Instagram called Hot Dudes Reading, which features, as its namesake implies, attractive men who are reading on the subway. The Instagram has almost 1 million followers, and a book featuring some of the photos was published last year.

Research has hinted at other qualities that attract women to men. Facial hair is, in general, appealing to women, according to research published in the May issue of the Journal of Evolutionary Biology. But attraction to men during different stages of beard growth—clean face, stubble and a heavy beard—depended on what the woman was looking for. Another study—which has not been peer-reviewed or published in a scientific journal—found that people are more likely to be attracted to someone who shares features of their parents.

http://www.newsweek.com/men-muscles-and ... ing-717053

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 Post subject: Re: This Week In Obvious Science
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 3:46 pm 
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Mac wrote:
Scientists discover that women and gays are more attracted to healthy rich men. Well stop the fucking presses...

Quote:
The study at Coventry and Aberystwyth universities in the United Kingdom, published in Feminist Media Studies in August, analyzed images over a period of three years since 2014.



Some cunts running this bullshit "study" received funding & paychecks for three motherfucking years doing this nonsense.

Let that ridiculous waste roll around in your head for a bit. :roll:


These social sciences are a scam.

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 Post subject: Re: This Week In Obvious Science
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 3:53 pm 
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There is worse pillow talk

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 Post subject: Re: This Week In Obvious Science
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 5:06 pm 
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Alexandra Witze wrote:

Image

Ageing satellites put crucial sea-ice climate record at risk​

Scientists scramble to avert disruption to data set that has tracked polar ice since the late 1970s.

One of the most important continuous records of climate change — nearly four decades of satellite measurements of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice — might soon be interrupted.

Scientists all over the world rely on the sea-ice record compiled by the US National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in Boulder, Colorado. But the US military satellites that collect the data, by measuring ice extent using microwave sensors, are approaching the end of their lives. Three are still working but ageing, and their intended successor started experiencing glitches in 2016, before conking out for good this month. The next possible replacement won't launch until at least the early 2020s (see 'Seeing ice').

That means the most complete and most scientifically significant sea-ice record is at risk of breaking. Any gap in satellite coverage is not just a short-term problem: it would compromise future research, because scientists would not be able to accurately compare observations made before the gap with those from afterward.

“Sea ice is the canary in the coal mine, and the canary’s about to fall off its perch,” says David Gallaher, an expert in satellite remote sensing at the NSIDC.

Centre analysts have begun testing the inclusion of sea-ice data from a Japanese satellite, but that spacecraft — designed to last five years — is now five years old. Experts looking to avert the looming gap will gather to debate other options, including the potential use of data from a Chinese satellite, in December, at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Eyes in the sky

In addition to tracking Arctic change, the sea-ice record is also important for climate modellers. Knowing that sea ice formed at a particular location at a particular time gives the air and ocean temperature for that spot, allowing researchers to test simulations of the atmosphere and the ocean.

The data to assess sea-ice coverage come from polar-orbiting satellites carrying passive-microwave sensors that can see through clouds. The sensors detect the brightness of the surface below and translate those measurements into how much ice and water are present.

NASA began taking passive-microwave measurements of sea ice in 1972, using an instrument aboard its Nimbus-5 satellite. That sensor's failure four years later interrupted observations of phenomena such as an Oregon-sized hole that opened in the Antarctic sea ice in successive winters during the mid-1970s. By the time NASA restarted its passive-microwave measurements in 1978, the hole had vanished.

Image

Mysteriously, a large patch of open water appeared in the same region last month — the biggest spotted in four decades. Gallaher says that scientists cannot accurately compare the patch from 2017 to those seen in the 1970s, because the break in the satellite record makes it hard to calibrate Nimbus-5 observations against later ones.

“That’s why it's so critical that you have overlap” from one sea-ice satellite to the next, he says.

NSIDC analysts continued using NASA sea-ice data until 1987, when they switched to information collected by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). The military uses the microwave information to detect ocean wind speeds to feed into weather models, among other uses, but the data happen to be nearly perfect for sensing sea ice, says Walt Meier, a sea-ice specialist with the NSIDC. The centre has been using DMSP data ever since.

Today, the centre uses data from three DMSP satellites that are more than 8, 11 and 14 years old — and designed to last five. A newer satellite, known as F-19, was launched in 2014 but experienced sensor problems in 2016. It became inoperable this month after tumbling out of control. The final probe in the series, the unlaunched F-20, was dismantled last year after Congress stopped funding the programme.

“Everyone kept saying we got F-20, but then it became obvious 20 wouldn’t go up,” says Gallaher. “The science community was caught kind of flat-footed.”

Tenuous times

The US military is developing another set of weather satellites to replace the DMSP series, but the one carrying a microwave sensor will not launch before 2022. That means that when the current three ageing satellites die, the United States will be without a reliable, long-term source of sea-ice data. “Every day it’s more and more risk,” says Meier. “If one of those goes it will get to be nail-biting time, and certainly if two of them go.”


For now, the centre is preparing for those scenarios by incorporating data from Japan’s AMSR2 microwave sensor into its sea-ice record. Another, more politically fraught option is to pull in data from the China Meteorological Administration’s Fengyun satellite series. Their data are already being incorporated into European weather-prediction modelling, and they carry passive-microwave sensors that are appropriate for studying sea ice. Since 2011 Congress has banned NASA scientists from working with Chinese scientists — but not necessarily from using Chinese data.

One final possibility is finding a way to launch the passive-microwave sensor that scientists at the US Naval Research Laboratory salvaged from the dismantled DMSP satellite. The sensor currently sits at the Aerospace Corporation in El Segundo, California, where researchers are trying to find a way to get it into orbit. “It’s a beautiful instrument,” says Donald Boucher, a principal scientist and engineer with Aerospace. “It must fly.”

But the military might ultimately opt to launch the sensor on something such as the International Space Station, which travels over the Earth’s low and middle latitudes. That would fulfil US troops' weather-prediction needs, but would not provide the polar orbit needed to study sea ice. Other planned military or commercial satellites might be able to provide some information about sea-ice cover, but not with the level of detail and continuity that researchers desire.

“It’s kind of frightening that you can have a record as rich and continuous as what this is, and just not a real good way of continuing it,” says Molly Hardman, a remote-sensing specialist at the NSIDC. “It’s depressing.”


The satellite data, the best data we have - Ted Cruz

Image

Why not have that data? :roll:

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 Post subject: Re: This Week In Obvious Science
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 5:28 pm 
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nero wrote:
Alexandra Witze wrote:

Image

Ageing satellites put crucial sea-ice climate record at risk​

Scientists scramble to avert disruption to data set that has tracked polar ice since the late 1970s.

One of the most important continuous records of climate change — nearly four decades of satellite measurements of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice — might soon be interrupted.

Scientists all over the world rely on the sea-ice record compiled by the US National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in Boulder, Colorado. But the US military satellites that collect the data, by measuring ice extent using microwave sensors, are approaching the end of their lives. Three are still working but ageing, and their intended successor started experiencing glitches in 2016, before conking out for good this month. The next possible replacement won't launch until at least the early 2020s (see 'Seeing ice').

That means the most complete and most scientifically significant sea-ice record is at risk of breaking. Any gap in satellite coverage is not just a short-term problem: it would compromise future research, because scientists would not be able to accurately compare observations made before the gap with those from afterward.

“Sea ice is the canary in the coal mine, and the canary’s about to fall off its perch,” says David Gallaher, an expert in satellite remote sensing at the NSIDC.

Centre analysts have begun testing the inclusion of sea-ice data from a Japanese satellite, but that spacecraft — designed to last five years — is now five years old. Experts looking to avert the looming gap will gather to debate other options, including the potential use of data from a Chinese satellite, in December, at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Eyes in the sky

In addition to tracking Arctic change, the sea-ice record is also important for climate modellers. Knowing that sea ice formed at a particular location at a particular time gives the air and ocean temperature for that spot, allowing researchers to test simulations of the atmosphere and the ocean.

The data to assess sea-ice coverage come from polar-orbiting satellites carrying passive-microwave sensors that can see through clouds. The sensors detect the brightness of the surface below and translate those measurements into how much ice and water are present.

NASA began taking passive-microwave measurements of sea ice in 1972, using an instrument aboard its Nimbus-5 satellite. That sensor's failure four years later interrupted observations of phenomena such as an Oregon-sized hole that opened in the Antarctic sea ice in successive winters during the mid-1970s. By the time NASA restarted its passive-microwave measurements in 1978, the hole had vanished.

Image

Mysteriously, a large patch of open water appeared in the same region last month — the biggest spotted in four decades. Gallaher says that scientists cannot accurately compare the patch from 2017 to those seen in the 1970s, because the break in the satellite record makes it hard to calibrate Nimbus-5 observations against later ones.

“That’s why it's so critical that you have overlap” from one sea-ice satellite to the next, he says.

NSIDC analysts continued using NASA sea-ice data until 1987, when they switched to information collected by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). The military uses the microwave information to detect ocean wind speeds to feed into weather models, among other uses, but the data happen to be nearly perfect for sensing sea ice, says Walt Meier, a sea-ice specialist with the NSIDC. The centre has been using DMSP data ever since.

Today, the centre uses data from three DMSP satellites that are more than 8, 11 and 14 years old — and designed to last five. A newer satellite, known as F-19, was launched in 2014 but experienced sensor problems in 2016. It became inoperable this month after tumbling out of control. The final probe in the series, the unlaunched F-20, was dismantled last year after Congress stopped funding the programme.

“Everyone kept saying we got F-20, but then it became obvious 20 wouldn’t go up,” says Gallaher. “The science community was caught kind of flat-footed.”

Tenuous times

The US military is developing another set of weather satellites to replace the DMSP series, but the one carrying a microwave sensor will not launch before 2022. That means that when the current three ageing satellites die, the United States will be without a reliable, long-term source of sea-ice data. “Every day it’s more and more risk,” says Meier. “If one of those goes it will get to be nail-biting time, and certainly if two of them go.”


For now, the centre is preparing for those scenarios by incorporating data from Japan’s AMSR2 microwave sensor into its sea-ice record. Another, more politically fraught option is to pull in data from the China Meteorological Administration’s Fengyun satellite series. Their data are already being incorporated into European weather-prediction modelling, and they carry passive-microwave sensors that are appropriate for studying sea ice. Since 2011 Congress has banned NASA scientists from working with Chinese scientists — but not necessarily from using Chinese data.

One final possibility is finding a way to launch the passive-microwave sensor that scientists at the US Naval Research Laboratory salvaged from the dismantled DMSP satellite. The sensor currently sits at the Aerospace Corporation in El Segundo, California, where researchers are trying to find a way to get it into orbit. “It’s a beautiful instrument,” says Donald Boucher, a principal scientist and engineer with Aerospace. “It must fly.”

But the military might ultimately opt to launch the sensor on something such as the International Space Station, which travels over the Earth’s low and middle latitudes. That would fulfil US troops' weather-prediction needs, but would not provide the polar orbit needed to study sea ice. Other planned military or commercial satellites might be able to provide some information about sea-ice cover, but not with the level of detail and continuity that researchers desire.

“It’s kind of frightening that you can have a record as rich and continuous as what this is, and just not a real good way of continuing it,” says Molly Hardman, a remote-sensing specialist at the NSIDC. “It’s depressing.”


The satellite data, the best data we have - Ted Cruz

Image

Why not have that data? :roll:


Why doesn't Finland step up and launch a few satellites to fill in any possible gaps?

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 Post subject: Re: This Week In Obvious Science
PostPosted: Tue Nov 21, 2017 5:35 pm 
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