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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2018 2:46 pm 
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http://video.foxnews.com/v/583450924200 ... show-clips

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Suppressor upgrade to make US Special Ops even more deadly

Sep. 13, 2018 - 3:42 - Defense Specialist Allison Barrie on how the United States' elite Special Operations warriors are set to become even more deadly when upgraded cutting-edge suppressor become a new addition to their arsenal.

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Wed Nov 07, 2018 3:34 pm 
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https://www.military.com/dodbuzz/2018/1 ... -says.html

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Future Army Brigades Will Fight for a Week Without Resupply, General Says

6 Nov 2018
Military.com | By Matthew Cox
The head of Army logistics said Tuesday he wants to make sure combat brigades of the future can operate on their own in combat for an entire week without resupply.

Currently, brigade combat teams can go about three days without needing to be resupplied with necessities such as fuel, water, food and ammunition, depending on battlefield conditions.

"Our goal [is] to have brigade combat teams sustain themselves for seven days without resupply," Lt. Gen. Aundre Piggee, who is responsible for Army logistical operations as deputy chief of staff for Army G4, told an audience at an Institute of Land Warfare breakfast sponsored by the Association of the United States Army. "That is significant. Seven days, that is a challenge."

Such a change may require the service to improve fuel consumption in combat vehicles by as much as 30 percent, Piggee said, adding, "We have to be creative in reducing demand to meet this goal."

The Army has taken steps to meet this goal by ensuring that BCTs have "a mobile supply of parts we forecast will be the most needed in austere environments fighting a decisive action operation," he said. "We have greatly improved our supply of spare parts across the Army."

The service also wants to standardize additive manufacturing by relying more on 3D printers so units can print spare parts in the field as needed, Piggee said. "We do not need to make repair parts 8,000 miles from soldiers if we can print them on the battlefield at their forward locations."

To accomplish this, Army Materiel Command is establishing a center of excellence for advanced manufacturing at Rock Island Arsenal in Rock Island, Illinois.

"We are in the process of finalizing policy so we can train this capability," Piggee said.

In 2016, the Army began improving its capability to "set a theater in a large operational deployment against a capable adversary," a skill the service had not had to use in more than a decade since combat forces operated out of well-supplied forward operating bases in Iraq and Afghanistan, he said.

"I believe we are much better shape than we were just two years ago," Piggee said. "We have gone back to the basics. We were not used to moving and maintaining equipment because equipment was waiting for us at forward operating bases and contractors did most of our maintenance. We are now training this capability every day."

-- Matthew Cox can be reached at matthew.cox@military.com.



Out of that entire article I find this the most intriguing:

Quote:
The service also wants to standardize additive manufacturing by relying more on 3D printers so units can print spare parts in the field as needed, Piggee said. "We do not need to make repair parts 8,000 miles from soldiers if we can print them on the battlefield at their forward locations."


Think about that for a moment.

Flash back to Star Trek and the replicators...

Tony the mechanic in the front line motor pool repair unit is repairing a disabled M1 Abrams tank and needs a replacement air filter, or a 3/8 inch nut, or virtually anything for that matter. "Siri, give me a ____"

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Wed Nov 07, 2018 5:37 pm 
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Hhuh. I was under the impression that the materials which are viable for "3D printing" are a fairly narrow spectrum of materials. Steel for example or aluminum, I was under the impression those are not options for "3D printing?"

I mean, as far as I can tell it is effectively just a fancy computer controlled mold-pouring machine, so anything that cannot be melted and injected into a mold form and then hardened through mixing or something to that effect is just NOT an option for 3D printing, no?

So . . . if I'm correct, something like an air filter? Yeah that seems viable, but a 3/8" nut would need to have high hardness and tensile strength and I'm not sure if an of the sorts of materials that work in those machines are viable.

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Wed Nov 07, 2018 5:53 pm 
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Anthropoid wrote:
Hhuh. I was under the impression that the materials which are viable for "3D printing" are a fairly narrow spectrum of materials. Steel for example or aluminum, I was under the impression those are not options for "3D printing?"

I mean, as far as I can tell it is effectively just a fancy computer controlled mold-pouring machine, so anything that cannot be melted and injected into a mold form and then hardened through mixing or something to that effect is just NOT an option for 3D printing, no?

So . . . if I'm correct, something like an air filter? Yeah that seems viable, but a 3/8" nut would need to have high hardness and tensile strength and I'm not sure if an of the sorts of materials that work in those machines are viable.


I will be the first to admit that I am not a know it all expert on 3D printers.
I don’t own one and have never used one either.

Maybe you can’t print air filters or nuts, but I presume that Lt. Gen. Aundre Piggee, who is responsible for Army logistical operations as deputy chief of staff for Army G4, does know a thing or two about them. He is the one who spoke about their usefulness.

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:57 pm 
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chijohnaok wrote:
Anthropoid wrote:
Hhuh. I was under the impression that the materials which are viable for "3D printing" are a fairly narrow spectrum of materials. Steel for example or aluminum, I was under the impression those are not options for "3D printing?"

I mean, as far as I can tell it is effectively just a fancy computer controlled mold-pouring machine, so anything that cannot be melted and injected into a mold form and then hardened through mixing or something to that effect is just NOT an option for 3D printing, no?

So . . . if I'm correct, something like an air filter? Yeah that seems viable, but a 3/8" nut would need to have high hardness and tensile strength and I'm not sure if an of the sorts of materials that work in those machines are viable.


I will be the first to admit that I am not a know it all expert on 3D printers.
I don’t own one and have never used one either.

Maybe you can’t print air filters or nuts, but I presume that Lt. Gen. Aundre Piggee, who is responsible for Army logistical operations as deputy chief of staff for Army G4, does know a thing or two about them. He is the one who spoke about their usefulness.


I'll speculate and maybe one of these other guys who knows what he is talking about can jump in and clarify if I'm wrong.

"3D Printing" is sexy, even though they still (after what? 5 or maybe even 10 years?) have seemingly not really "taken off." Definitely a cool means to manufacture small chachki type stuff. I think you can even do low-strength receivers for semi- and automatic-firearms using some kind of polymer. However, I suspect such receivers are not nearly as durable as the metal ones that are used in most modern firearms. Not saying Piggee's claims are "false" per se; having a 3D printer in the brigade probably is part of the plan to allow quick replacement for a wide range of parts. But I'd guess it is only one component of the overall plan and doesn't account for a large fraction of the reduced supply overhead.

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 4:52 pm 
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India has a nuclear sub????? The Ganges is 1000 mile long cesspool and they are building nuclear subs???

https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/Intern ... ontent=RSS

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 5:15 pm 
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jack t ripper wrote:
India has a nuclear sub????? The Ganges is 1000 mile long cesspool and they are building nuclear subs???

https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/Intern ... ontent=RSS


I am a bit surprised at that.
IIRC, India has had a lot of issues with building its own “homegrown” armaments.
They have a policy which encourages developing and building weapons internally, but have had issues with quality and actually delivering those weapons systems.

How long before one of their nuclear powered subs goes boom or starts glowing in the dark?

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:29 pm 
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I would guess that the Russian and Chinese are monitoring the action to see what electronic goodies we've got.

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 12:20 am 
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Quote:
Dry-Dock Sinking Could Accelerate the Russian Navy’s Decline

New, smaller ships could replace bigger, old ones

November 12, 2018 David Axe

The sinking of the Russian navy’s biggest dry dock could spell trouble, and change, for the world’s third-biggest navy.

PD-50, a huge floating dry dock at the 82nd Repair Shipyard in Roslyakovo, Russia, accidentally sank on Oct. 29, 2018 after an electrical malfunction resulting in pumps overfilling the dock’s ballast tanks.

Four shipyard workers were hurt.

Admiral Kuznetsov, Russia’s sole aircraft carrier, was aboard PD-50 at the time of the sinking. The carrier remained afloat but suffered damage from a collapsing crane.

It could take years for the Kremlin to make up for PD-50’s loss. In the meantime, the Russian fleet will lack a floating repair facility for the 60,000-ton-displacement Kuznetsov and potentially other large warships of Cold War-vintage.


It could take years for the Kremlin to make up for PD-50’s loss. In the meantime, the Russian fleet will lack a floating repair facility for the 60,000-ton-displacement Kuznetsov and potentially other large warships of Cold War-vintage.

Dry docks lift ships out of the water, allowing workers to access their lower hulls for deep maintenance.
Even before PD-50’s sinking, the Russian fleet was slowly replacing big, old ships with much smaller new ones that can’t sail as far or carry as much weaponry, but which are cheaper and easier to operate and repair than the old vessels are.

The Kremlin bought four new, small warships in 2018. The Russian fleet numbers some 300 vessels, most of them displacing just a few thousand tons of water. For comparison, the U.S. Navy has roughly the same number of ships, but they are, on average, much larger.

Before, Moscow planned on extending the service lives of its carrier and other warships from the 1980s in order to complement the newer vessels. For long-range deployments across the Atlantic or to war zones such as Syria, Russia tends to send Kuznetsov and equally aged, Soviet-built destroyer and cruisers.

Newer corvettes, which are a fraction of the size of a Cold War cruiser, have tended to remain close to home. In recent years, corvettes from the Caspian Sea fleet have fired long-range Kalibr cruise missiles at targets in Syria — all without ever leaving Russian waters.

A shortage of accessible dry docks for repairing bigger ships complicates the Kremlin’s naval planning.

In that way, PD-50’s sinking could accelerate the Russian fleet’s existing transformation. “It is probably unlikely to force any radical changes,” said Pavel Podvig, an independent expert on the Russian military.

The Russian navy was already becoming a “green-water” force optimized for near-shore missions in support of ground operations along Russia’s periphery, as opposed to a “blue-water” force like the U.S. and Chinese navies are.

Without PD-50, the Russian navy could become a green-water fleet even faster, forcing the Kremlin to reconsider its overall naval ambitions. “In many ways, this reinforces the view that Russia’s naval future is not that of major power-projector, but rather significant harassment force,” said Eric Wertheim, author of Combat Fleets of the World.

As of early November 2018, the 1,080-feet-long PD-50 lay at the bottom of the Kola Bay in northern Russia. Deputy Prime Minister Yuri Borisov said a commission would consider the navy’s options for fixing or replacing dock.

Asked if the navy might raise and repair PD-50, Borisov said “the ‘yes’ answer is more likely than ‘no.'” It could take six months just to refloat the dock, according to state media. Refurbishment could take months or years of additional work.

Russian officials have downplayed PD-50’s loss. “We have alternatives actually for all the ships except for Admiral Kuznetsov,” Alexei Rakhmanov, head of the United Shipbuilding Corporation, told state media.

That alone is a big problem for a fleet with just one carrier. “It’s not clear what will happen to Kuznetsov now,” Podvig said.

Moreover, many of Russia’s other, smaller dry docks are thousands of miles from the fleet’s main northern bases. Moving the docks, or the ships needing repair, could be difficult, expensive and time-consuming.

For the most part, the yards and design bureaus that produced the Cold War fleet still exist, even if they are a bit dilapidated and under-staffed. Russia could, in theory, build a new dry dock or buy one from a European or Asian builder. Likewise, the country could design and build new, large warships to replace the older, maintenance-intensive vessels.

The main problem is money. The Kremlin was already struggling with the cost of modernizing its fleet even before PD-50 sank. “It remains unclear whether Russia’s economy will be able to sustain more than a short-term, piecemeal modernization long into the future,” Wertheim said.

The Russian government might have to choose. It could spend potentially tens of millions of dollars raising and repairing PD-50, all in order to repair some 30-year-old ships for a few more years of service.

Or it could decommission those ships and replace them with new, smaller vessels. Given those naval options, Moscow might turn its back on the past and look to the future.

This story originally appeared at The National Interest.



Sounds as if Russia may be forced to downsize its navy, if not in size, then in the scope of its capability/influence.

Less of a threat to the US...but still, or perhaps more of a threat to its neighbors.

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 1:25 am 
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Here is an interesting podcast that I stumbled onto:

https://www.strategypage.com/StrategyTa ... 7-2018.mp3

It’s title and subject:
Naval Size Matters - 11/8/2018 Jim and Austin explore the United States Navy current and future ship levels.

It’s from The Strategypage website.

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