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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2018 2:15 pm 
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I think USN carriers operating in the Barents Sea area might offer the mostly likely opp for Finns to operate off carriers ... in the event of conflict with bear-like critters ...

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2018 4:03 pm 
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IIRC Wilkerson is an "artillery" guy so he might appreciate this article:

https://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htart ... 80328.aspx

Quote:
Artillery: Thunder In The East

March 28, 2018: South Korea continues to obtain export sales for its K9 “Thunder” 155mm self-propelled howitzers. At the end of 2017 Norway ordered 24 K9s. The $215 million order includes six K10 armored resupply vehicles, tech support, some spares and an option to buy 24 more K9s on the same terms. The first K9s will arrive in 2019 and will replace Cold War era U.S. M109A3 vehicles.

This is one of several recent K9 export sales. In 2017 Finland ordered 48 used (by South Korea) K9s and Estonia later ordered twelve. The largest recent K9 sale was to India, but that one came with a catch. In 2016 South Korea agreed to partner with an Indian firm (L&T) to build a hundred of its South Korean designed K9s for the Indian Army. The K9s will cost about $7 million each and half the work will be done in South Korea while the rest will be done in India by L&T. The Indian Army wanted 100-150 more K-9s but budget problems limit the current deal to 100. Egypt is currently testing the K9 and is inclined to order some in 2018. South Korea also made deals to provide major components of the K9 (mainly the chassis) to Poland and Turkey so they could build a local self-propelled howitzer around it. The Turkish deal included the South Korean turret and gun.

The k9 entered service in 1999 and the South Korean military has ordered over 1,100 K9s since then and is even replacing some of the earlier ones with newly manufactured ones. South Korea also bought 179 of the K10 ammunition resupply vehicles.

While superficially similar to the American M109 the K9 is a heaver (46 tons versus 28 for the M109), carries more ammo and has twice the range (up to 56 kilometers in part because of a barrel that is a third longer). There is more automation on the K9, so it has a crew of five versus six on the M-109. With the K9 South Korea joins Germany in their effort to build a suitable replacement for the elderly M109 design. The chief competitor for the Indian contract was Russia which offered its similar 42 ton 2S19. The K9 won on the basis of technical capabilities, field tests and a South Korean reputation for quality and reliability.

This is all the result of South Korea deciding to become a major weapons developer and exporter. This began in the 1990s after South Korea had become a major economic power and exporter. South Korea has been successful at this although the largest customer remains the South Korean military, which has to deal with the threat from North Korea.


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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2018 5:29 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2018 2:14 pm 
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chijohnaok wrote:
That does sound interesting Kameo. Congrats to the pilot on this accomplishment. It certainly does set a foundation for further cooperation.

I’m not sure how practical it is though.

How many opportunities would there/could there be for Finnish pilots to be operating off a US Navy carrier? For one on one situations (like this one) it works out fine.

However, what sort of military conflict would there be in which Finnish pilots would be operating off US carriers?
Finland’s sea zone is essentially limited to the Baltic Sea. Off the top of my head, I cannot ever recall a US Navy CV operating in the Baltic. There has never been a need for that since there are so many land air bases within range to operate from. The Baltic is small and there could be limitations with regards to movement (it being a confined area doesn’t help and with only the Straits of Denmark as an entrance/exit point I suspect would make some captains/fleet commanders nervous. I don’t know if The Kiel Canal in Germany could transit a vessel as large as a US CV...I doubt it). Now US carriers have operated out of the Mediterranean Sea, but that is much larger in comparison to the Baltic.


I don't sit at the big boys' table, I just get scraps left over by the mice when they've had their fill.

No FAF Hornet is ever going to land on USN carrier - it is a strict USN policy. They only let fighters maintained by themselves on their standards that they know have been thus maintained and prepared to land. There's a shit ton that could go wrong if a plane wasn't fit for landing, they don't fool around with the carriers for the sake of being nice and friendly.

Why does it look like Finns are building up skills to land on carriers?

That's a good question. We'll be soon (2022 or so) officially announcing that we'll get ~60 F-35s to replace our 60 Hornets. I wonder if that changes anything, though the F-35A isn't VTOL if I am correct and I think it's the A-model that is the export model. But then, you guys weren't supposed to sell Hornets to us either but F-16s, yet attitudes shifted and we got 'em.

I can't think of how such a skill would hurt a pilot operating a fighter theoretically capable of landing on a carrier. It would be an ability to add to the list and for our situation, abilities can manifest as options in the future even if they aren't such today.

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Fri Apr 06, 2018 5:10 am 
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This is the flag of my national service era unit:

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Feeling a bit nostalgic today.


The Jääkärimarssi with English subtitles.

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Mon Apr 09, 2018 10:21 am 
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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2018 6:06 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2018 8:23 pm 
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https://warisboring.com/indias-aircraft ... dvantages/

Quote:
India’s Aircraft Carriers Have Some Advantages
Experience and nearby land bases means they should not be underestimated


WIB SEA April 13, 2018 Robert Farley

With one large carrier in service and another on the way, India has become one of the world’s pre-eminent naval aviation powers.

How did the program come about? Where is it going? And what is the strategic rationale for India’s massive investment in aircraft carriers?

The origins of India’s carriers
Despite considerable economic challenges, India took carrier aviation very seriously in the years after independence. Unlike China or even the Soviet Union, India focused on carriers instead of submarines.

INS Vikrant, a Majestic-class light carrier, served from 1961 until 1997, fighting effectively in the 1971 war. INS Viraat, formerly the Centaur-class carrier HMS Hermes, joined the Indian Navy in 1987 and served until 2016.


These carriers gave the Indian Navy long-term experience in carrier ops, as well as a compelling organizational logic for maintaining a carrier capability.

The current situation
By the early 2000s, Viraat was showing her age. The supply of second-hand carriers, long dominated by the Royal Navy’s World War II relics, had narrowed considerably. Instead of building a new ship itself, India determined to acquire an older Soviet carrier, the former Kiev-class warship Admiral Gorshkov, which had been out of service since the 1990s.

India paid in excess of $2 billion for a massive reconstruction that left the ship nearly unrecognizable, with a ski-jump deck and transformed weapon systems. When accepted into service in 2014, the new 45,000-ton INS Vikramaditya could operate around 20 MiG-29K fighters, along with utility helicopters.

Despite cost-overruns and serviceability problems, the ship offered the Indian Navy the chance to redevelop its aviation muscles after years of operating only VSTOL — vertical and/or short take-off and landing — aircraft from Viraat.

Vikramaditya was only the first step towards recapitalizing the aviation wing of the Indian Navy. The second step was the new INS Vikrant, a 40,000-ton ski-jump carrier built in India’s Cochin Shipyard. Laid down in 2009, Vikrant is expected to finally enter service around 2020, with an air wing similar to that of Vikramaditya.

The construction process has witnessed a number of setbacks, many of which are to be expected from a first effort at carrier construction.

For the time being, India has decided to stick with the MiG-29K as its primary naval combat aircraft, rather than the Su-33, the F/A-18 or the Dassault Rafale. Both Boeing and Dassault remain at least somewhat hopeful of exporting carrier-borne fighters to India. Even Saab expressed an interest in converting the Gripen for naval service.

The Indian Navy also contemplated developing a navalized version of the HAL Tejas, but — for now — has wisely rejected the complicated effort to convert the troubled fighter.

Strategic rationale
India’s carrier force has developed a three-pronged rationale for its purpose.

The first prong is support of a conventional war against Pakistan, which would involve strikes against Pakistani naval assets and land bases. Unfortunately, Vikrant and Vikramaditya would struggle in strike operations because of limitations on aircraft weight, although they certainly would attract Pakistani attention.

Second, the carriers make the Indian Navy the preeminent force in the Indian Ocean, better able to command the area than any foreign competitor. Indian carriers will always have better access to bases and support facilities in the Indian Ocean than China, the United Kingdom or even the United States, and the presence of the carriers facilitates the projection of Indian power and the management of trade protection.

The third prong involves geopolitical competition with China.


With the anticipated commissioning of its second large carrier, China has managed to leapfrog Indian naval aviation development in a relatively short period of time. Although China lacks India’s experience with carriers, it boasts a remarkably efficient shipbuilding industry and an increasingly sophisticated aviation sector, making it less dependent on foreign technology.

Although India may struggle to keep up with Chinese construction, it can leverage geography — proximity to bases — to its advantage in the most likely areas of any conflict.

What to expect from the Indian Navy
The next step in India’s naval aviation project will be INS Vishaal, a 65,000-ton conventionally propelled, domestically produced CATOBAR — Catapult Assisted Take-Off But Arrested Recovery — carrier. With experience gleaned from the experience with Vikrant, the design and construction of the carrier will hopefully go more smoothly.

It appears as if India will have unprecedented access to U.S. technology for the construction of Vishaal, including the EMALS electromagnetic catapult system used on the Gerald R. Ford class.

Unlike Vikrant or Vikramaditya, Vishaal will be able to launch and recover heavy strike aircraft, as well as early warning planes such as the E-2 Hawkeye. Vishaal is supposed to enter service by 2030, although that timeline may be optimistic.

More recently, a spate of rumors has suggested that India might try to acquire one of the variants of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Deciding to buy the F-35, and then going through with it, would deeply tax India’s military procurement bureaucracy, however, and would require a great deal of forbearance from U.S. export control officials.

Still, the F-35C is the world’s most modern carrier fighter, and INS Vishaal could surely operate the plane.

Next steps
By the early 2030s, India plans to have three active carriers. At that point, the next presumed step will be to replace INS Vikramaditya; although lightly used, her hull is already 30 years old, and she will be less capable than the other two ships.

If Vishaal is at all acceptable, India’s best bet would be simply to build more of that design, which would allow the capture of construction efficiencies will also enabling incremental improvements.

Although the Indian Navy has toyed with the idea of nuclear propulsion, it really doesn’t need a nuclear carrier; the strategic tasks of the navy should keep it relatively close to home, and building nuclear propulsion into the design would result in three different carriers with three different designs, limiting efficiency and co-operability.

Conclusion
India has committed to carrier aviation, and has the resources and experience to develop a successful force. However, India still faces some big decisions, including the choice of a new carrier fighter and the design characteristics of its flagship class of fleet carriers.

Much will depend on how successfully India masters the difficulties of large-scale shipbuilding, and how well it integrates new technologies into the design and construction process.

This article originally appeared at The National Interest.


I'm not sure that I would go so far as to say "With one large carrier in service and another on the way, India has become one of the world’s pre-eminent naval aviation powers", but I will grant them being a 'formidable naval aviation power that is based in South East Asia'.

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2018 10:18 pm 
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Bravo twos ... on the move over head ...

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 Post subject: Re: Military Thread
PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2018 4:05 pm 
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Quote:
China’s New Aircraft Carrier Is Already Obsolete
But it's still a powerful signal of Beijing's ambitions in a post-U.S. Asia.
By Sam Roggeveen | April 25, 2018, 2:16 PM

(Continued)
https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/04/25/ch ... -obsolete/


Interesting.

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