Trump, Trump, Trump

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Re: Trump, Trump, Trump

#2761 Post by Anthropoid » Sat Feb 08, 2020 1:24 am

Constitutional to the max bbaby.

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Re: Trump, Trump, Trump

#2762 Post by nero » Sat Feb 08, 2020 9:53 am

Did Trump say at National Prayer Breakfast that Jesus is wrong? Just like the US Constitution is wrong with bribery according Trump.



But certainly Jesus was very particular with stock prices. ;)

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A stupid person is a person who causes losses to another person or to a group of persons while himself deriving no gain and even possibly incurring losses. -- Carlo M. Cipolla

Mit der Dummheit kämpfen selbst Götter vergebens. -- Friedrich Schiller

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Re: Trump, Trump, Trump

#2763 Post by nero » Mon Feb 10, 2020 3:54 am

Is there a rift forming between the traditional allies? Or is this just normal negotiation tactics? :o
Adam Bienkov wrote: Image

Trump slammed the phone down on Boris Johnson after an 'apoplectic' call with the prime minister

Image
  • President Donald Trump reportedly vented his fury with UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson during an "apoplectic" phone call last week.
  • The call was made after Johnson defied Trump by allowing the Chinese telecoms company Huawei to develop Britain's 5G network.
  • The Sun reported on Friday that Johnson had delayed his planned trip to the US.
  • Johnson and senior members of his government have criticized Trump and his administration in recent weeks.
President Donald Trump reportedly hung up on UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson after what officials described as an "apoplectic" call last week.

Trump ended the call by "slamming the phone down," a source told the Evening Standard.

The call, which one source described to the Financial Times as "very difficult," came after Johnson defied Trump and gave the Chinese telecoms company Huawei the rights to develop the UK's 5G network.

Trump's fury was triggered by Johnson backing Huawei despite Trump and his allies' threats that the United States would withdraw security cooperation with the UK if the deal went ahead.

Trump's threats reportedly irritated the UK government, with Johnson frustrated at the president's failure to suggest any alternatives to the deal.

Following the call, US Vice President Mike Pence said the Trump administration had made its disappointment in the UK "very clear."

The official UK account of the call hinted at the disagreement, saying Johnson "underlined the importance of like-minded countries working together to diversify the market and break the dominance of a small number of companies."

The Sun reported on Friday that Johnson had pushed back a planned trip to Washington to March, adding that it "may be pushed back still further."

A representative for Johnson declined to comment on the call.

Johnson says Trump is 'failing to lead'

Image

The prime minister and senior members of his administration have pointedly criticized Trump in recent weeks.

On Monday, Johnson used his first major speech on foreign policy since the general election in December to launch a thinly veiled attack on Trump and his "protectionist" economic strategy.

"Free trade is being choked," Johnson said, alluding to ongoing trade battles between Washington and China.

"And that is no fault of the people. That's no fault of individual consumers. I am afraid it is the politicians who are failing to lead."

In an apparent barb at Trump and his threats to launch a new trade war with Europe, Johnson added that "from Brussels to China to Washington, tariffs are being waved around like cudgels, even in debates on foreign policy where frankly they have no place."
:roll:
A stupid person is a person who causes losses to another person or to a group of persons while himself deriving no gain and even possibly incurring losses. -- Carlo M. Cipolla

Mit der Dummheit kämpfen selbst Götter vergebens. -- Friedrich Schiller

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Re: Trump, Trump, Trump

#2764 Post by Anthropoid » Mon Feb 10, 2020 9:29 am

Sheeeeiiitt!
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Re: Trump, Trump, Trump

#2765 Post by nero » Mon Feb 10, 2020 10:21 am

Problem caused by capitalism.

Image

Odd that Britain, France, Japan, Germany, Canada, Netherlands and Switzerland are all capitalistic countries. :roll:
A stupid person is a person who causes losses to another person or to a group of persons while himself deriving no gain and even possibly incurring losses. -- Carlo M. Cipolla

Mit der Dummheit kämpfen selbst Götter vergebens. -- Friedrich Schiller

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Re: Trump, Trump, Trump

#2766 Post by chijohnaok » Mon Feb 10, 2020 12:38 pm

nero wrote:
Mon Feb 10, 2020 10:21 am
Problem caused by capitalism.

Image

Odd that Britain, France, Japan, Germany, Canada, Netherlands and Switzerland are all capitalistic countries. :roll:
No bankruptcies in Canada due to medical bills?

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/article ... uptcy-myth

The Medical Bankruptcy Myth

Appeared in American Magazine Online

The debate about American healthcare is being influenced by recent controversial research claiming to show that nearly two-thirds of personal bankruptcies in the United States resulted from uninsured medical expenses or loss of income due to illness. An earlier 2005 edition of this research claimed that just over half of personal bankruptcies were due to these “medical causes.” The authors of these studies, David Himmelstein, Deborah Thorne, Elizabeth Warren, and Steffie Woolhandler, argue that the problem of “medical bankruptcies” would be solved by the adoption of a government-run health insurance system like Canada’s.

The research has been politically persuasive. President Obama himself cited the dubious link between medical expenses and personal bankruptcy as part of his rationale for a massive increase of government involvement in healthcare. “The cost of healthcare now causes a bankruptcy in America every 30 seconds,” he declared in March. “By the end of the year, it could cause 1.5 million Americans to lose their homes.”

A July 28 hearing of the House Judiciary Committee titled, “Is Our Healthcare System Bankrupting Americans?” prominently featured the medical bankruptcy study. More recently, in a USA Today column, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer cited medical bankruptcy to justify their healthcare overhaul efforts.

Yet the medical bankruptcy study has been soundly refuted by several researchers. This includes critiques published by David Dranove and Michael Millenson in Health Affairs and a working paper by the American Enterprise Institute’s Aparna Mathur. The idea that large numbers of Americans are declaring bankruptcy due to medical expenses is a myth.

Dranove and Millenson critically analyzed the data from the 2005 edition of the medical bankruptcy study. They found that medical spending was a contributing factor in only 17 percent of U.S. bankruptcies. They also reviewed other research, including studies by the Department of Justice, finding that medical debts accounted for only 12 percent to 13 percent of the total debts among American bankruptcy filers who cited medical debt as one of their reasons for bankruptcy.

As for the notion that greater government involvement in health insurance will reduce bankruptcy, it is helpful to compare personal bankruptcy rates in the United States and Canada. Unlike the United States, Canada has a universal, government-run health insurance system. Following the logic of Himmelstein and colleagues, we should therefore expect to observe a lower rate of personal bankruptcy in Canada compared to the United States.

Yet the evidence shows that in the only comparable years, personal bankruptcy rates were actually higher in Canada. Personal bankruptcy filings as a percentage of the population were 0.20 percent in the United States during 2006 and 0.27 percent in 2007. In Canada, the numbers are 0.30 percent in both 2006 and 2007. The data are from government sources and defined in similar ways for both countries and cover the time period after the legal reforms to U.S. bankruptcy laws in 2005 and before the onset of the 2008 economic recession.

This is important, because the 2005 reforms produced U.S. legal standards for bankruptcy filing that are now very similar to Canada’s. Before 2005 it was much easier to file for bankruptcy in the United States, making cross-border comparisons prior to the legal changes meaningless. Further, in 2008 the United States was harmed by massive systemic home mortgage defaults that did not occur in Canada because of differences in mortgage lending practices. U.S. mortgage defaults would have been correlated with increased bankruptcy rates. Therefore, Canada-U.S. comparisons in 2008 are not valid because the data is skewed by other policy differences unrelated to health insurance.

Aside from universal single-payer health insurance, there are few other significant health, social, or legal policy differences between the two countries that could be causally linked to bankruptcy rates. Both countries have employment insurance programs that provide income support in the event of job loss. In fact, unemployment occurs with roughly similar frequency among Canadians and Americans. National unemployment rates in 2007 were 5.3 percent in Canada versus 4.6 percent in the United States.

Drug insurance is also structured almost identically, so exposure to drug costs is similar in both countries. While the entire Canadian population is universally eligible for publicly funded insurance for hospital and physician services, only about one-third of the Canadian population is publicly insured for prescription drugs. In Canada, as in the United States, low-income people, disabled populations, and seniors are eligible for separate publicly funded drug programs, while most employed people obtain drug insurance as a benefit of employment, and the rest of the population pays cash.

Access to medical care for people who experience long-term unemployment, disability from illness, and chronic low-income status is also practically the same in both countries, being facilitated by non-profit, publicly funded community health centers and public programs such as Medicaid in the United States and government-run systems in Canada.

The truth is that the majority of debt among bankrupt consumers in both Canada and the United States is comprised of non-medical expenditures and therefore has little to do with health insurance coverage.

On the rare occasion that medical debts do partially contribute to bankruptcy, they likely accumulate from patients’ demands for the kinds of expensive, cutting-edge or end-of-life treatments that would never be covered by government insurance anyway. It is a fact that many of these same types of expensive treatments are increasingly not insured by government healthcare in Canada.

Indeed, if we define medical bankruptcies the way Himmelstein and colleagues did for their study in the United States, we find such bankruptcies also occur in Canada. Survey research commissioned by the Canadian government found that despite having a government-run health system, medical reasons (including uninsured expenses), were cited as the primary cause of bankruptcy by approximately 15 percent of bankrupt Canadian seniors (55 years of age and older).

There is no objective evidence to indicate that a government-run health care system in the United States will reduce personal bankruptcies. The U.S.-Canada comparative analysis strongly suggests that bankruptcy statistics are being exaggerated and distorted for political reasons.

Author:

Brett J. Skinner
the Canadian government found that despite having a government-run health system, medical reasons (including uninsured expenses), were cited as the primary cause of bankruptcy by approximately 15 percent of bankrupt Canadian seniors (55 years of age and older).
So, I call BS on not even one bankruptcy in Canada due to medical reasons.

——

If Canada’s health care system is so wonderful, then why are they having issues with wait time for treatments?

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/studies ... anada-2019

Snippets:

This edition of Waiting Your Turn indicates that, overall, waiting times for medically necessary treatment have increased since last year. Specialist physicians surveyed report a median waiting time of 20.9 weeks between referral from a general practitioner and receipt of treatment—longer than the wait of 19.8 weeks reported in 2018. This year’s wait time is just shy of the longest wait time recorded in this survey’s history (21.2 weeks in 2017) and is 124% longer than in 1993, when it was just 9.3 weeks.

There is a great deal of variation in the total waiting time faced by patients across the provinces. Ontario reports the shortest total wait—16.0 weeks—while Prince Edward Island reports the longest—49.3 weeks. There is also a great deal of variation among specialties. Patients wait longest between a GP referral and orthopaedic surgery (39.1 weeks), while those waiting for medical oncology begin treatment in 4.4 weeks.
And
Patients also experience significant waiting times for various diagnostic technologies across the provinces. This year, Canadians could expect to wait 4.8 weeks for a computed tomography (CT) scan, 9.3 weeks for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, and 3.4 weeks for an ultrasound.
I suppose not having to have out of pocket expenses is a plus, but having to wait 39 weeks for a surgical procedure or more than a month to get your tumor dealt with could be a problem.

Also:
America Outperforms Canada in Surgery Wait Times—And It's Not Even Close

America is significantly outperforming Canada in surgery wait times even as it’s likely that tens of thousands of Canadians come here to get surgery.
Wednesday, July 17, 2019
https://fee.org/articles/america-outper ... ven-close/

Patients in the US have significantly lower wait times for things like surgeries, EVEN WITH TENS OF THOUSANDS OF CANADIANS COMING HERE TO GET THEIR PROCEDURES DONE.
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links

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Re: Trump, Trump, Trump

#2767 Post by nero » Mon Feb 10, 2020 1:24 pm

chijohnaok wrote:
Mon Feb 10, 2020 12:38 pm
nero wrote:
Mon Feb 10, 2020 10:21 am
Problem caused by capitalism.

Image

Odd that Britain, France, Japan, Germany, Canada, Netherlands and Switzerland are all capitalistic countries. :roll:
No bankruptcies in Canada due to medical bills?

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/article ... uptcy-myth

The Medical Bankruptcy Myth

Appeared in American Magazine Online

The debate about American healthcare is being influenced by recent controversial research claiming to show that nearly two-thirds of personal bankruptcies in the United States resulted from uninsured medical expenses or loss of income due to illness. An earlier 2005 edition of this research claimed that just over half of personal bankruptcies were due to these “medical causes.” The authors of these studies, David Himmelstein, Deborah Thorne, Elizabeth Warren, and Steffie Woolhandler, argue that the problem of “medical bankruptcies” would be solved by the adoption of a government-run health insurance system like Canada’s.

<<removed because character cutoff>>

There is no objective evidence to indicate that a government-run health care system in the United States will reduce personal bankruptcies. The U.S.-Canada comparative analysis strongly suggests that bankruptcy statistics are being exaggerated and distorted for political reasons.

Author:

Brett J. Skinner
the Canadian government found that despite having a government-run health system, medical reasons (including uninsured expenses), were cited as the primary cause of bankruptcy by approximately 15 percent of bankrupt Canadian seniors (55 years of age and older).
So, I call BS on not even one bankruptcy in Canada due to medical reasons.

——

If Canada’s health care system is so wonderful, then why are they having issues with wait time for treatments?

https://www.fraserinstitute.org/studies ... anada-2019

Snippets:

This edition of Waiting Your Turn indicates that, overall, waiting times for medically necessary treatment have increased since last year. Specialist physicians surveyed report a median waiting time of 20.9 weeks between referral from a general practitioner and receipt of treatment—longer than the wait of 19.8 weeks reported in 2018. This year’s wait time is just shy of the longest wait time recorded in this survey’s history (21.2 weeks in 2017) and is 124% longer than in 1993, when it was just 9.3 weeks.

There is a great deal of variation in the total waiting time faced by patients across the provinces. Ontario reports the shortest total wait—16.0 weeks—while Prince Edward Island reports the longest—49.3 weeks. There is also a great deal of variation among specialties. Patients wait longest between a GP referral and orthopaedic surgery (39.1 weeks), while those waiting for medical oncology begin treatment in 4.4 weeks.
And
Patients also experience significant waiting times for various diagnostic technologies across the provinces. This year, Canadians could expect to wait 4.8 weeks for a computed tomography (CT) scan, 9.3 weeks for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, and 3.4 weeks for an ultrasound.
I suppose not having to have out of pocket expenses is a plus, but having to wait 39 weeks for a surgical procedure or more than a month to get your tumor dealt with could be a problem.

Also:
America Outperforms Canada in Surgery Wait Times—And It's Not Even Close

America is significantly outperforming Canada in surgery wait times even as it’s likely that tens of thousands of Canadians come here to get surgery.
Wednesday, July 17, 2019
https://fee.org/articles/america-outper ... ven-close/

Patients in the US have significantly lower wait times for things like surgeries, EVEN WITH TENS OF THOUSANDS OF CANADIANS COMING HERE TO GET THEIR PROCEDURES DONE.
How many Americans go to Canada to buy prescription drugs like insulin?

But obviously there is place for place for improvement in healthcare in Canada. That is pretty obvious to me.

But if you tell that healthcare is more affordable, more efficient and achievable in the US than in Canada, I disagree.

OTOH I am certain that Bernie should forget his "medicare for all" and change it to NHS for America and use the following in his campaign.



;)
A stupid person is a person who causes losses to another person or to a group of persons while himself deriving no gain and even possibly incurring losses. -- Carlo M. Cipolla

Mit der Dummheit kämpfen selbst Götter vergebens. -- Friedrich Schiller

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Re: Trump, Trump, Trump

#2768 Post by Anthropoid » Mon Feb 10, 2020 1:43 pm

Arguing with a pro-centralization advocate on the topic of nationalizing health care products or services is like arguing with an evangelical Muslim about the merits of trying out the pork ribs from the local homosexual-owned barbecue restaurant. You're never gonna convince them, and you MIGHT incite them to throw you off a building.

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Re: Trump, Trump, Trump

#2769 Post by chijohnaok » Mon Feb 10, 2020 1:53 pm

But if you tell that healthcare is more affordable, more efficient and achievable in the US than in Canada, I disagree.
I didn’t make that claim.

There is no “perfect” health care system in the real world.
Each system has its pluses and minuses.

In the US you will have high costs and high deductibles sometimes.
In socialized health insurance countries you will have rationing, and may have long wait times, or some treatments/procedures that may not be available.
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links

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Re: Trump, Trump, Trump

#2770 Post by nero » Mon Feb 10, 2020 2:04 pm

chijohnaok wrote:
Mon Feb 10, 2020 1:53 pm
But if you tell that healthcare is more affordable, more efficient and achievable in the US than in Canada, I disagree.
I didn’t make that claim.

There is no “perfect” health care system in the real world.
Each system has its pluses and minuses.

In the US you will have high costs and high deductibles sometimes.
In socialized health insurance countries you will have rationing, and may have long wait times, or some treatments/procedures that may not be available.
How many countries charge $10K for a childbirth? ;)

Anyway this healthcare discussion and capitalism worship are both off topic.

The topic of thread is to mock Trump. ;)
A stupid person is a person who causes losses to another person or to a group of persons while himself deriving no gain and even possibly incurring losses. -- Carlo M. Cipolla

Mit der Dummheit kämpfen selbst Götter vergebens. -- Friedrich Schiller

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