maddogdrivethru.net

Open all night
It is currently Fri Dec 14, 2018 12:40 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 800 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70 ... 80  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Will Europe Ever Defend Itself?
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 6:45 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 10520
Location: Eskridge, KS
Reputation points: 14677
U-boats or mozzlims ... tough choice !!!

:D

_________________
Go trumpf Go !!!
(will the resident return to being the President?)
(will the rainbow shack return to being the White House?)


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Will Europe Ever Defend Itself?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:33 pm 
Offline
Staff Sergeant
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2008 6:42 am
Posts: 4031
Location: France
Reputation points: 10157
Apparently, they do still not speak about a second aircraft carrier, for the moment.

Macron's government to boost military spending, modernize

Quote:
French President Emmanuel Macron's government is ramping up military spending, arming drones and hiring more "cyberfighters" for Europe's biggest army — notably amid demands by NATO and U.S. President Donald Trump for European countries to pitch in more for their own defense.

The French defense minister presented a bill Thursday foreseeing 295 billion euros ($364 billion) in overall defense spending from 2019 to 2025. That includes 1.7 billion euros in additional spending each year through 2022, particularly to modernize equipment and improve intelligence.

.../...


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Will Europe Ever Defend Itself?
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 3:50 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 31639
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
https://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/libr ... tnik01.htm

[Note: consider that the news source is "Sputnik", a Russian entity. That said, given the prior articles that I have seen about the state of the Germany military, this news article seems credible]

Quote:
Germany Fails to Fulfill NATO Rapid Response Force Requirements - Reports

Sputnik News

13:06 19.02.2018(updated 18:00 19.02.2018)

MOSCOW (Sputnik) - The German Armed Forces lack bulletproof vests, winter uniforms, and tents to fulfill their NATO duties in establishing a rapid response force group, the Rheinische Post newspaper reported, citing a German Defense Ministry document.

The Rheinische Post newspaper reported that the military would not be able to fulfill its promise of mobile deployment at least until 2021. Explaining this delay, the Defense Ministry said that between 2018 and 2020, a total of 10,282 housing units will be needed compared to the only 2,500 units the armed forces have now. The Bundeswehr also needs winter uniforms and bulletproof vests.

In early 2019, the Bundeswehr is set to get on board with a role in creating the NATO Very High Readiness Joint Task Force Spearhead. The project classifies the increased combat readiness of 5,000 troops on standby for deployment wherever needed within 48-72 hours.

Earlier in February, German media also reported that the army did not have enough battle tanks for Spearhead.

NATO has urged the new government in Germany to increase defense spendings in order to achieve the alliance's 2 percent of the GDP goal. Fifteen of NATO's 29 members have achieved plans of spending 2 percent of their GDP on defense in order to meet the alliance's defense spending goal by 2024, overall increasing spending by $46 billion.

Expectations of the Bundeswehr's readiness to invest in NATO are growing, yet there are equipment shortages that forced the German military use alternative materials instead of machine guns during NATO exercises. The reason for the shortage is a lack of spare details and high maintenance costs. The German army will try to cover the "existing deficit of capabilities with elements from other strategic units," according to local media.




Quote:
The Bundeswehr also needs winter uniforms


Hmmmm....where have I heard that before? Russian Front 1941-42 :lol:

Maybe they can start a donation drive to get the troops their winter wear....it's been done before:

Image

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Will Europe Ever Defend Itself?
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 4:59 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major

Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2008 3:19 pm
Posts: 27911
Reputation points: 20000
Quote:
Fifteen of NATO's 29 members have achieved plans of spending 2 percent of their GDP on defense in order to meet the alliance's defense spending goal by 2024, overall increasing spending by $46 billion.


"achieved plans" to reach a promise in 6 years that was made decades ago?

That is bull shit.

_________________
I haven't figured out how to the block thingy works but if anyone alters my posts I will become really, really angry and throw monkey poop out of my cage.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Will Europe Ever Defend Itself?
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 6:24 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major

Joined: Wed Dec 17, 2008 12:33 pm
Posts: 20944
Location: LV-426
Reputation points: 15927
A couple of days ago Jan Stoltenberg (NATO sec'y general) argued to the EU against developing a separate EU military from NATO on the grounds that at the present time, 80% of Europe's defense was being provided by nations other than EU ones.

That's the EU for you. Parasites to the core.

_________________
"Fuck the king." - Sandor Clegane

"And the story was whatever was the song what it was." - Dire Straits


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Will Europe Ever Defend Itself?
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 6:39 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 31639
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
mdiehl wrote:
A couple of days ago Jan Stoltenberg (NATO sec'y general) argued to the EU against developing a separate EU military from NATO on the grounds that at the present time, 80% of Europe's defense was being provided by nations other than EU ones.

That's the EU for you. Parasites to the core.


If they want to push forward with a Euro defense, then the US and Canada can always just drop from the existing NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) and start a new NATO (North American Treaty Organization).

[Mexico to be excluded--they will be cut off from 'North America' by our wall ;-) ]

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Will Europe Ever Defend Itself?
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 6:51 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major

Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2008 4:43 pm
Posts: 16119
Reputation points: 720
mdiehl wrote:
A couple of days ago Jan Stoltenberg (NATO sec'y general) argued to the EU against developing a separate EU military from NATO on the grounds that at the present time, 80% of Europe's defense was being provided by nations other than EU ones.

That's the EU for you. Parasites to the core.

Not all. ;)

_________________
The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt

Mit der Dummheit kämpfen selbst Götter vergebens.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Will Europe Ever Defend Itself?
PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 10:01 am 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 31639
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
http://www.dw.com/en/limited-number-of- ... a-42752070

Quote:
Limited number of weapons in German military ready for action: report

German lawmakers are set to hear about how Germany's military, the Bundeswehr, has access to less than 50 percent of many major weapons systems. The findings are the latest to underscore problems in the armed forces.


Date 27.02.2018

Many primary weapons systems in the Bundeswehr are not available for training exercises or deployment, according to a new Defense Ministry study.

The "Report on the Operational Readiness of the Bundeswehr's Primary Weapons Systems 2017," which has been seen by the Reuters news agency and the RedaktionsNetzwerk Deutschland media group, is set to be presented to Germany's lower house of parliament, the Bundestag, on Wednesday.

Number of weapon systems ready for action:


    Eurofighter jet airplanes: 39 of 128
    Tornado jet airplanes: 26 of 93
    CH-53 transport helicopters: 16 of 72
    NH-90 transport helicopters: 13 of 58
    Tiger helicopters: 12 of 62
    A400M transport planes: 3 of 15
    Leopard 2 tanks: 105 of 224
    Navy frigates: 5 of 13

Ukraine's effect
The Defense Ministry said a higher number of training missions and deployments since Russia's intervention in eastern Ukraine in 2014 had caused existing equipment to wear down quicker than it had previously.

The report also did not calculate readiness for each type of weapons system based on the total number of weapons. Instead, it referenced the total number minus weapons under long-term maintenance, modernization or testing.

This calculation resulted in a total of 81 deployable Eurofighters rather than 128, leading to a higher ratio of airplanes available for deployment.

Some improvement

The report found however that the readiness for most weapon types had improved. Around 550 more weapons were available in 2017 for deployment compared to 2014.

Readiness for weapons used in active foreign missions was also higher than average, the Ministry said.

Based on these figures, it said that Germany could fulfill its obligations to the NATO alliance, including the rapid deployment force Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF).

Defense Minister defends record

Defense Minister von der Leyen of Chancellor Angela Merkel's center-right Christian Democrats (CDU) defended the Bundeswehr's progress in an interview with the Bavarian daily newspaper Passauer Neue Presse on Tuesday.

"We cannot make up for the years of reductions and cuts over 25 years," she said, adding that the Bundeswehr's €200 billion ($250 billion) modernization program had been "a long and arduous path," but that the government would remain committed to it.

Merkel's conservatives and the center-left Social Democrats (SPD) agreed to set aside €10 billion for the Bundeswehr in a coalition deal, which is still pending approval. The pact also accords the military "priority" along with international development if more money becomes available in the federal budget in the future.

Greens see red

The budgetary and defense spokesman for the Greens, Tobias Lindner, accused Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen of failing to remedy a serious problem.

"A lot of engagements and training exercises understandably put strain on the Bundeswehr, but the military must react proactively and not just look on helplessly at how its equipment breaks down," he said.

The Defense Ministry's report comes after the Bundestag's military commissioner, Hans-Peter Bartels, complained about "large holes in personnel and equipment" in the Bundeswehr in a separate paper published in mid-February.


I don't know what US readiness numbers are at (for comparison) but the numbers mentioned above don't sound so good.

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Will Europe Ever Defend Itself?
PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 10:49 am 
Offline
Sergeant Major

Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 7:44 am
Posts: 11605
Reputation points: 17050
They better hope the cold winter doesn't continue, or Finnish ski troops could be in Berlin by the end of a week.

_________________
“The gap in EU finances arising from the United Kingdom’s withdrawal and from the financing needs of new priorities need to be clearly acknowledged.” - Mario Monti


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Will Europe Ever Defend Itself?
PostPosted: Thu Mar 15, 2018 3:21 pm 
Offline
Sergeant Major
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:50 pm
Posts: 31639
Location: West coast of the east coast
Reputation points: 20000
Some action by Sweden:

https://www.defensenews.com/global/euro ... st-russia/

Quote:
Europe

Fortress Sweden: Inside the plan to mobilize Swedish society against Russia

By: Aaron Mehta   23 hours ago

WASHINGTON — Roughly 220 miles of ocean separates Sweden from the heavily militarized Russian port of Kaliningrad. The country’s long, narrow shape leaves it vulnerable to air assault from multiple sides. And Sweden, along with neighboring Finland, are in the unique position as the only non-NATO aligned nations on the Baltic Sea.

Hence, the nation spent the Cold War years preparing to fend for itself against a great power invasion, drawing up plans for how to mobilize the entirety of the civilian population and infrastructure to defend its territory. And then the Soviet Union collapsed, a new era of peace dawned and those plans were left to fall fallow.

Now, Sweden is looking to change that.

A landmark commission formed in early 2017 is laying the groundwork to revitalize Sweden’s “total defense” concept, which would see the country ready to use all aspects of Swedish life to push back an invasion from an unspecified foreign adversary — but one that sounds suspiciously like Europe’s biggest bogeyman in Moscow.

In an exclusive interview with Defense News during a recent visit to Washington, Defence Commission head Bjorn von Sydow and commission secretariat chief Tommy Akesson explained their vision for revitalizing Sweden’s defense infrastructure — one they believe must enable the country to hold out against a major invasion for three months.

“When we say civil defense, we mean all civil activities in society, including medical care, including shelters of course, including private companies, everything. Local communities and all their obligations,” Akesson said. “It’s a total mobilization of the country and planning for how to put all forces in society in the direction of solving, in the worst case, a military attack.”

Spending to prepare

The commission was initially tasked only with providing a final report by May 2019, but decided to go ahead and release a six-page interim report late last year in order to provide the public and allies insight into their initial thoughts — and, von Sydow acknowledged, to let any potential, unnamed adversaries know that an invasion of Swedish territory will be costly.

“Sweden was famous for this during the Cold War, with very elaborate and detailed plans, down to how parking garages were designed so you could use them as shelters,” said Magnus Nordenman of the Atlantic Council. “Talking about it [now] sends a signal they realized the challenge and are doing something about it.”

The report estimates that between 2021 and 2025, Sweden will need to invest 4.2 billion krona (U.S. $510.5 million) per year on its total defense proposals. While not a major spend by American defense levels, that is a serious investment for Sweden, especially considering it is additional money on top of what the country intends to invest in its armed forces.

In the meantime, von Sydow has about 400 million krona per year in 2018, 2019 and 2020 to invest in total defense developments. That culminates with a major exercise, tentatively planned for the year 2020, involving all aspects of the total defense concept — in essence, a trial run incorporating the entire nation.

Where do those funds go? A lot will go toward infrastructure, such as building new shelters and depots. Other funds will go toward developing new technologies needed to defend the homeland. And part of it will be spent on training to resist propaganda efforts and fake news spread via social media. That latter point is something von Sydow said was important because part of the commission’s requirement is not just to defend the homeland, but to defend the democratic principles that are vital to the nation.

“Ultimately the protection of democracy and political process is viewed as a core national interest,” said Erik Brattberg with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. “That is part of defense and total defense. It’s not just about making sure people have electricity and food. It’s also about making sure societal values, principles and norms” exist.

A potential complication is the upcoming September general elections in Sweden, which could reshape the ruling coalition that has thrown its support behind the concept. However, von Sydow expressed his belief that enough parties back moving forward with the commission’s work, so whichever party ends up on top will not look to undo the commission’s progress.

Three months and one week

Early in the process, the commission seized on two key principals: that it would take Sweden’s military a week to be fully mobilized, and that it would take three months before allied ground forces would be able to arrive in force to assist Sweden in protecting its territory.

On the first point, von Sydow said it is a simple reality that to mobilize the entire nation would take time. For that week, civilians would have to fend for themselves as best they can — something he described as having been calmly received by the Swedish public.

The second point is perhaps more controversial, in that it’s based not on policy but on a mix of historic studies and conversations with allies. Because Sweden is not part of NATO, any military action would have to come from a coalition of willing allies.

And while friends to Sweden may respond with air power or nonmilitary actions such as sanctions, getting a military force on the ground to retake territory claimed by Russia would take time. That is especially complicated if one assumes a military intervention in Sweden would likely occur with Russia pushing into several other nations at the same time, creating a crisis across Europe.


“It was made clear, even more clear for us, exposed by sources I do not want to tell you about, that basically it would be within the scope of NATO or NATO countries; they would take at least this time to deploy contributions,” von Sydow said, adding the commission has briefed several allied nations, as well as NATO proper.

Nordenman thinks both time frames are accurate reads on the situation, pointing out that citizens in the U.S. have had to fend for themselves for a week or more following natural disasters. As to the three-month gap, he calls it “not a bad assumption to use,” largely due to broad concerns about how slowly a NATO-based coalition can spin into action.

“There is growing recognition, even in NATO circles, that under current arrangements, it will be a while before we’re in a position to defend anyone in northern Europe,” Nordernman said.

Brattberg sees a silver lining to the commissions’ three-month conclusion: that Sweden does expect assistance to come eventually, even if it takes time. He points to a series of recent bilateral agreements between Sweden and other nations, including the U.S. and Finland, as perhaps fueling that.

Finland in particular provides a unique viewpoint, as it, too, has a total defense plan. But unlike Sweden, it never dismantled that plan after the Cold War.

In a recent interview, Finnish Defence Policy Director-General Janne Kuusela told Defense News he wouldn’t put a similar timeline for when aid might come, but acknowledged that his country has to plan to take care of itself in case of an invasion.

“It’s not going to be an easy walk to try and invade us,” Kuusela said. “Any potential aggressor has to think about that twice before entering Finland.”

Ultimately, the goal of the Swedish commission is to get to that point, as well, but the question of time is now a factor. The commission’s plans call for Sweden’s total defense concept to be up and running by 2025, a long time given how quickly geopolitics have shifted in recent years.

“Give us time, give us plans, give us exercises, give us people, and we can do” what is needed, von Sydow said. “We need time, but we will do as much as possible.”



Well, Sweden does have one thing going for them. There seems to be a healthy supply of hand grenades that can be used in the event of an invasion by a foreign power. ;-)

_________________
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.
- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 800 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70 ... 80  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group