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 Post subject: Re: Back to Iraq
PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 10:10 am 
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BOOM ... war is hell ...


Quote:
... At least 125 people have been killed and about 150 injured in an explosion claimed by the Islamic State group in Baghdad, Iraqi police say.
A car bomb exploded on a busy street in the central district of Karrada late on Saturday.
The mainly Shia area was busy with shoppers late at night because it is the holy month of Ramadan.
...


Maybe Fallulah made the daeshi a little upset ... :)

Hopefully the Iranians will get even more motivated and get serious about taking over all of Iraq ... (and Syria) ... that should generate some solid "bad blood" ...

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Iraq
PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2016 7:30 pm 
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http://www.iraqinews.com/iraq-war/veile ... nts-mosul/

Quote:
Veiled woman kills 2 ISIS militants in Mosul

Sep 28, 2016

(IraqiNews.com) Nineveh – Iraqi media outlets reported on Monday that two ISIS militants were killed in the city of Mosul by a veiled woman, and indicated that the incident is the third of its kind this month.

According to al-Sumaria “A veiled woman carrying a pistol killed two fighters of the Islamic State (ISIS), in the early hours of the morning, near a checkpoint in the vicinity of Numaniya neighborhood in the city of Mosul.”

“The incident is the third of its kind in the city of Mosul this month. This phenomenon raised ISIS concerns during the past weeks,” Sumaria added.

ISIS warned its members from the veiled woman who killed two of their fighters, last week, in the occupied Salahuddin Province. The attacks took place in al-Sharqat, which has been under ISIS control since the extremists overran the region in June 2014


Image

Who is this burka-wearing superhero?
A hard ass Muslim woman?
A trans-something or other male hiding in female clothing?

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Iraq
PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2016 11:08 am 
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http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/17/world ... .html?_r=0

Quote:
Iraqi Forces Attack Mosul, a Beleaguered Stronghold for ISIS

By ROD NORDLAND
OCT. 16, 2016

ERBIL, Iraq — Mosul’s residents are hoarding food and furtively scrawling resistance slogans on walls, while the city’s Islamic State rulers have feverishly expanded their underground tunnel network and tried to dodge American drones.

After months of maneuvering, the Iraqi government’s battle to reclaim Mosul, the sprawling city whose million-plus population lent the most credence to the Islamic State’s claim to rule a fledgling nation, has finally begun. In the early hours Monday, an announcement by Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi of the campaign’s opening was accompanied by artillery barrages and a rush of armored vehicles toward the front a few miles from the city’s limits.

Those forces will fight to enter a city where for weeks the harsh authoritarian rule of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, ISIL or Daesh, has sought to crack down on a population eager to either escape or rebel, according to interviews with roughly three dozen people from Mosul. Among them were refugees who managed to sneak out in recent weeks and residents reached by contraband cellphones in the city.

Just getting out of Mosul had become difficult and dangerous: Those who were caught faced million-dinar fines, unless they were former members of the Iraqi Army or police, in which case the punishment was beheading.

While the civilians described stockpiling food in basement hiding places, the jihadists were said to be frantically making military preparations within Mosul, temporarily fleeing the streets — most likely to an extensive tunnel network below — at the first signs of an airstrike, according to the new accounts.

Some of Mosul’s remaining one million or more residents had grown bolder in showing resistance to the Islamic State force ruling the city — numbering 3,000 to 4,500 fighters, the United States military estimated. Graffiti and other displays of dissidence against the Islamic State were more common in recent weeks, as were executions when the vandals were caught.

Early this month, 58 people were executed for their role in a plot to overturn the Islamic State that was led by an aide of the group’s leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, Reuters reported.

When fewer than 1,000 Islamic State fighters forced about 60,000 Iraqi Army and police defenders to abandon Mosul in June 2014, many among its Sunni population cheered their arrival. They saw the militants as fellow Sunnis who would end corruption and abuse at the hands of the Shiite-dominated Iraqi government and security services.

But much of that local good will dissipated after more than two years of harsh rule by the militants, a mix of Iraqis and Syrians with a grab bag of foreign fighters.

Mosul residents chafed under social codes banning smoking and calling for splashing acid on body tattoos, summary executions of perceived opponents, whippings of those who missed prayers or trimmed their beards, and destroying “un-Islamic” historical monuments.

“Anyone who has accepted Daesh before? They’ve changed their minds now,” said Azhar Mahmoud, a former Education Ministry official who recently fled his home village near Mosul, and who initially accepted rule by the Islamic State.

In addition, there were recent reports of at least some underground resistance within the city, if mostly symbolic. Photos and oral accounts abounded of the Arabic letter M scrawled on walls — standing for moqawama, or resistance. The Islamic State beheaded two men in front of one such slogan, and posted a video of the killings.

Another execution video identified the victims, punished for internet use, as members of the resistance group Suraya Rimah, according to the group’s leader, Omar Fadil al-Alaf, who is based in the Kurdish regional capital of Erbil, about 50 miles east of Mosul.

“People are just waiting for liberation so they can fulfill their promises to take revenge on Daesh and kill them,” Mr. Alaf said.

Compounding the militants’ problems with the population was a growing economic crisis, according to American officials. In recent months, the Islamic State lost control of oil fields near Raqqa in Syria and Qaiyara in Iraq, and trade with ISIS-held parts of Syria was choked off because of the group’s military reversals.

Electricity, once plentiful before Kurdish forces took back the Mosul Dam from militant control, has been typically available for only a couple of hours a day, residents say. Some areas lack running water, with residents forced to use personal generators to pump water from wells.

Schools had not opened at all this year, absent funding and teachers willing to work for nothing.

The local economic crisis hit the militants as well, with reports that they cut the pay for their fighters to less than $100 a month, from $400 in 2014, said Abu Bakr Kanan, a former leader of the Sunni religious affairs office in Mosul, who said he was in regular touch with residents there.

Many of the residents contacted described the militants as conducting a high-profile recruiting drive among 14- to 40-year-old males, depicting enlistment as a religious duty, but with apparently decreasing success.

A car mechanic who left the city just over two weeks ago, and asked not to be identified because he still had relatives there, said that on his final Friday in Mosul he attended prayers at which a prominent Islamic State imam harangued the worshipers about volunteering, but seemingly won no one over.

The militants’ security preparations have been directed not only at the city’s borders — particularly toward the south and east where Iraqi forces, allied militias and Kurdish pesh merga fighters are arrayed — but also internally. Traffic on secondary roads in the city was banned, and house-to-house searches — for weapons and any signs of organized resistance — were carried out in many neighborhoods.

Last month, a YouTube video surfaced of Suraya Rimah fighters appealing to residents of Mosul to kill their Islamic State rulers when the offensive began.

Resistance groups in the city — at least five claimed to have a presence — say they concentrated on assassinating individuals, said Abdullah Abu Ahmed, who described himself as a leader of an anti-ISIS brigade in Mosul called The Resistance. He was reached by telephone through intermediaries.

“All Mosul people, whenever they have the chance to fight and kill ISIS terrorists, they do so,” he said. He cited a recent attack on a jewelry market in which two members of the Islamic State were killed.

Over the past few weeks, coalition airstrikes began more intensively targeting the suspected homes of senior Islamic State figures in Mosul. Residents said those senior militants, many of whom had relatively high public profiles in the city, became conspicuous by their absence on the streets.

There have also been a notable number of desertions from the Islamic State. Kurdish officials said they had found 300 suspected deserters, or potential infiltrators, in recent months. Most were caught among the refugees escaping from ISIS-held territory who arrived at the Kurdish-run Dibaga Camp, the main site for refugees, south of Erbil, said Ardalan Mohiadin, who is in charge of the camp’s reception center.

Dibaga Camp now has 43,000 refugees from Mosul and other Islamic State strongholds, with about 11,000 arriving in September alone, Mr. Mohiadin said.

Despite months of preparation for a much larger wave of refugees from the city, aid officials warned that it was unlikely to be nearly enough once the fighting intensified.

“The United Nations is deeply concerned that in a worst-case scenario, the operation in Mosul could be the most complex and largest in the world in 2016, and we fear as many as one million civilians may be forced to flee their homes,” said Lise Grande, the United Nations’ humanitarian coordinator for Iraq.

Airstrikes on the militants in Mosul led many of them to move in among civilian residents, the locals said.

A woman who arrived at Dibaga Camp recently said her family had been forced to take in a Chechen ISIS fighter, and shortly afterward an airstrike hit the home, killing the militant but also two members of the family. The woman’s 9-year-old daughter was trapped under a collapsed wall.

The girl survived and is with her mother in the camp now.

Nearly all of the Mosul residents contacted spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of Islamic State retaliation. Even most refugees did not want to be identified because they still had relatives in Mosul.

“We are suffering from so many problems, we feel like the living dead,” said a woman who identified herself only by the initials S. A.

In addition to American air support, President Obama this month approved 615 more American troops to aid the Mosul offensive by providing intelligence and logistical assistance. That brings the American forces in Iraq to more than 5,000.

Some in Mosul described how militants had begun going house to house to collect used tires that could be set on fire to generate smoke screens.

“We expect everything,” said Sabah al-Numan, the spokesman for the Iraqi Counterterrorism Force. “We know this is the last station for ISIS — there is nowhere else for them to go. We have to prepare for a very tough fight.”

Reporting was contributed by Jamal al-Badrani and Kamil Kakol from Erbil, Falih Hassan and Omar Al-Jawoshy from Baghdad, and Michael R. Gordon from northern Iraq.


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Iraq
PostPosted: Sat Oct 22, 2016 1:34 pm 
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http://6abc.com/news/pentagon-identifie ... q/1566909/

Quote:
PENTAGON IDENTIFIES AMERICAN SERVICE MEMBER KILLED IN IRAQ

LUIS MARTINEZ
Friday, October 21, 2016 10:01PM

The U.S. Defense Department has identified the service member killed by a roadside bomb north of Mosul on Thursday as Navy Chief Petty Officer Jason C. Finan, 34, of Anaheim, California. Finan, who belonged to an explosive-ordnance disposal unit, was serving alongside Iraqi troops as an adviser.

According to a defense official, Finan was killed Thursday when the armored vehicle he was traveling in struck an improvised explosive device and the vehicle rolled over.

Finan was traveling at the time with members of Iraq's elite counterterrorism unit northeast of Mosul. He was flown to the Kurdish capital of Erbil for treatment where he died of his injuries.

Finan was assigned to Navy explosive ordnance disposal mobile unit based in Coronado, California.

"The entire Navy expeditionary combat command family offers our deepest condolences and sympathies to the family and loved ones of the sailor we lost," said Rear Adm. Brian Brakke, commander of the expeditionary force.

Finan was the first American military fatality in Iraq since the start of the Mosul operation earlier this week. He is the fourth U.S. service member to die in combat in the fight against ISIS.

According to U.S. defense officials, more than 100 American military advisers are accompanying Iraq's elite counterterrorism force and Kurdish peshmerga fighters pressing toward Mosul. The advisers help the Iraqi and Kurdish forces with planning and battlefield assistance.

The U.S. advisers serve at the headquarters level and are not supposed to be on the front lines. But given the reality of how the fighting units operate on the battlefield, the American advisers may get closer to a combat environment.


And we were told by President Obama that there would be no "boots on the ground".
(Although I suppose you could argue that since he was in an armored vehicle that his boots were not "on the ground".)

RIP Navy Chief Petty Officer Jason C. Finan :(

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Iraq
PostPosted: Sat Oct 22, 2016 11:02 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Back to Iraq
PostPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2016 10:46 am 
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The only reason the JV Team owns Mosul is because Hussein was trying to keep a campaign promise.

A company of Marines with air support could have defeated the original ISIS push.

What a less than useless POS Hussein is. BTW, one consequence of pretending we don't have troops engaged is we don't have the usual medical support and evac helicopters.

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Iraq
PostPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2016 1:36 pm 
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let's hope the Iraqis(shiites, kurds, some sunnis) take Mosul back from ISIS shortly. This wud be a good thing
>of course With the help of American forward air controllers, advisors on the ground, US special forces, US sniper teams, US bomb missions, etc...We help them take back Mosul, they are our turf forever...this will piss off the Iranians, also a good thing


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Iraq
PostPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2016 8:02 pm 
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NATO wrote:
let's hope the Iraqis(shiites, kurds, some sunnis) take Mosul back from ISIS shortly. This wud be a good thing
>of course With the help of American forward air controllers, advisors on the ground, US special forces, US sniper teams, US bomb missions, etc...We help them take back Mosul, they are our turf forever...this will piss off the Iranians, also a good thing


I do agree it would be good for them "Iraqis(shiites, kurds, some sunnis)" to take Mosul back from ISIS.

But it's not "our turf".

And even if we help take back Mosul, there is no guarantee that the government of Iraq won't fuck up (AGAIN) and lose it to either ISIL or the next radical Islamist group comes along.

As for pissing off the Iranians, they have other places they are exerting pressure (Yemen for example). Do we step in to Yemen to help them out as well? Where does it end? Because it seems that every time the US steps in to help out some Muslim country it ends up in more/other Muslims hating the US and leading to other troubles for us/USA.

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Iraq
PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2017 12:44 pm 
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https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/31/worl ... .html?_r=0
Quote:
U.S. Begins Arming Syrian Kurds for Final Assault on Raqqa
By ERIC SCHMITTMAY 31, 2017

WASHINGTON — The United States has started arming Syrian Kurds with heavy machine guns, antitank weapons and other arms, a critical step in preparing a pivotal part of the force that will carry out the final assault on the Islamic State’s de facto capital of Raqqa, Pentagon officials said.

The weapons deliveries follow the Trump administration’s decision earlier in May to arm the American-backed Kurdish militias over the objections of Turkey, an important NATO ally that considers the Kurdish fighters to be terrorists.

“The U.S.-led coalition has begun issuing arms and equipment to Kurdish elements of the S.D.F.,” Col. Ryan S. Dillon, a military spokesman in Baghdad, said in an email on Tuesday, using the abbreviation for the Syrian Democratic Forces, a combination of mostly Syrian Kurdish and Arab militias.

Colonel Dillon said the equipment provided included “small arms, ammunition, heavy machine guns” and antitank weapons to use against “heavily armored vehicle-borne I.E.D.s,” or improvised explosive devices. NBC News first reported that the arms shipments had begun.


American military commanders have long argued that arming the People’s Protection Units, or Y.P.G., a Kurdish militia fighting alongside Syrian Arab forces against the Islamic State, is the fastest way to seize Raqqa.

But Turkey has strongly objected to such a move, raising fears of a backlash that could prompt the Turks to curtail their cooperation with Washington in the struggle against the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL. Turkish officials have issued veiled threats that they would shut down allied operations at Incirlik Air Base, the major air hub for American and allied warplanes in the battle.

Turkey’s National Security Council said on Wednesday that the Trump administration’s decision to arm the Kurdish militia in Syria was “not befitting of an alliance.”

Equipment provided to the Kurds, which is being drawn from stockpiles in the region, will be limited in quantity and by mission, and will be doled out incrementally as objectives are reached, Colonel Dillon said.

American military officials have insisted for months that the weapons are needed to help the lightly armed Kurdish and Arab fighters cope with urban warfare in Raqqa against Islamic State militants who have been building fortifications for months and are equipped with car bombs and even some tanks they captured from the Syrian Army.

Thousands of Syrian Kurdish and Arab fighters have pushed to within about two miles of the city, where American military officials and humanitarian groups are bracing for a bloody, monthslong battle — similar to the fight Iraqi forces have carried out in Mosul, another Islamic State stronghold. In preparation for the assault, American and allied warplanes have intensified airstrikes against militant forces in and around Raqqa in recent weeks.

At the same time, the Kurdish and Arab militias, which American Special Operations forces are advising, have been tightening a rough cordon around most of the city, capturing dozens of small towns and villages as they go. The fighters have surrounded Raqqa from the north, the west and the east. The extremists still have an exit from the south, even though the American-led coalition destroyed two southern bridges over the Euphrates River.

To address Turkish concerns that the arms might be used against them after the fight for Raqqa is over, the supply of weapons and ammunition will be limited to what the Kurds and Arab fighters need to carry out specific operations, American officials said.

“Wherever possible, our advisers will monitor the use of the weapons and supplies we give the Kurdish elements of the S.D.F., ensuring use only against ISIS,” Colonel Dillon said. “Any alleged misuse or diversion of U.S. support will be taken seriously and lead to the possible curtailment of support, if verified.”

The United States has long worked with the Y.P.G. under the umbrella of the Syrian Democratic Forces. The American military has always emphasized that those forces include Arab fighters, who make up nearly half of the total force and most of the fighters near Raqqa. But the Y.P.G. is generally considered to have the most experienced and battle-hardened fighters.

The Turkish government has long insisted that the Kurdish militia is closely linked to the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, a separatist group. That group is listed by Turkey, the United States and Europe as a terrorist organization.

Some Syria analysts said on Wednesday that the militias would need to include more of the local Sunni Arab tribes to maintain the fighting force’s potency after the battle for Raqqa, if they aim to vanquish pockets of remaining Islamic State resistance in the region.

“Arming the Kurdish elements of the S.D.F. will make them more militarily effective against ISIS in Raqqa,” said Andrew J. Tabler, an expert on Syria at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. But, he added, referring to President Bashar al-Assad of Syria, “if they don’t expand to include more of the Sunni Arab tribes of the Euphrates River valley, who make up the majority there, the S.D.F. will have a hard time holding that area because of the Kurdish-Arab split, leaving that area vulnerable for an Assad regime comeback.”

Follow Eric Schmitt on Twitter @EricSchmittNYT.

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Iraq
PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 5:57 pm 
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Apparently the daeshi blew up a mosque ... could've fooled me ... I'd have to see the before/after :)

Image

Oh this was the mosque in mosul where some daeshi guy declared a kalifate a few years back ... does that mean the kalifate is dead !!??

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