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 Post subject: Re: Is This the Death of Hong Kong?
PostPosted: Sun Sep 28, 2014 11:38 pm 
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chijohnaok wrote:
abradley wrote:
China want's Taiwan to join it as a 'one state, two systems' like Hong Kong is supposed to be.

Maybe China sees the US as impotent and unable/wont back Taiwan as we have in the past. So Taiwan will have to bow to economic pressure (embargo anyone) so the 'two systems one state' isn't necessary.

Leading from behind.


If the Chinese truly want to entice Taiwan into the "one state two systems", they are setting a poor example by what they are doing in Hong Kong.
The Taiwanese can look at Hong Kong and see what their future is.



Yup.


That 'Evil European Imperialist' setup was actually a pretty good gig, wasn't it? Try telling that to the liberal Social Justice Warrior apologists. :lol:

Everyone knew Hong Kong's liberties would be slowly ground under heel by the Chicoms after they took it back in the 90s. Looks like it's now coming to a head, unsurprisingly.

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 Post subject: Re: Is This the Death of Hong Kong?
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 6:06 pm 
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http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2 ... ufferd7f03

Quote:

In China, the Most Censored Day of the Year
Mainland censors scrubbing news of Hong Kong protests were busier yesterday than they were on the anniversary of Tiananmen.


BY BETHANY ALLEN-EBRAHIMIAN SEPTEMBER 29, 2014

Censors on Weibo, China's massive Twitter-like microblogging platform, just had their biggest day of the year. And once again, it was events in the special administrative region of Hong Kong, not the Chinese mainland, that triggered it.

Student-led demonstrations in downtown Hong Kong began on Sept. 26, protesting against what organizers believe is increased encroachment by Beijing in Hong Kong politics, despite a promise to maintain separate systems of governance. On Sept. 28, police attempted to disperse protesters with tear gas, pepper spray, and batons, shocking the traditionally peaceful port city unused to displays of police violence. While protester ranks swelled as Hong Kong residents joined the demonstrations, China's small army of online censors burst into action in China's digital public square, quickly deleting related photos and comments posted to Weibo, a Chinese social platform with 46 million daily active users. Weibo censorship hit its highest point this year at 152 censored posts per 10,000, according to Weiboscope, an analytics project run by the University of Hong Kong. ("Hong Kong" and "police" were the day's top censored terms.) To put that in perspective, the Sept. 28 censorship rate was more than double that on June 4, the 25th anniversary of the crackdown on the Tiananmen student movement -- an event so meticulously censored in both traditional and social media that many of China's younger generation are largely ignorant of the event.

In recent months, Hong Kong has become increasingly unsettled over the question of universal suffrage, which Beijing has avowed it will allow only if candidates for Hong Kong's chief executive, the top government position there, are chosen by a committee stacked with pro-Beijing interests, rather than selected by open nomination. Activist groups such as Occupy Central, a pro-democracy civil disobedience movement, and Scholarism, a student-led group that has organized a Hong Kong-wide class boycott, have formed to push back against what they perceive as Beijing's gradual encroachment upon Hong Kong's autonomy.

Authorities in Beijing clearly fear that demands for democratic reform in Hong Kong may spread to the mainland, and censorship activity, ordered by the state, bears this out. Despite 2014's many politically sensitive and potentially destabilizing events -- including a March 1 terrorist attack at a busy train station, the July 29 announcement of an investigation into former security watchdog Zhou Yongkang, and the Sept. 23 sentencing of prominent Uighur scholar Ilham Tohti on charges of separatism -- the three most censored days on Weibo nevertheless all related to Hong Kong. Beijing's official rejection on August 31 of open nomination of candidates in Hong Kong came in second, while the annual July 1 pro-democracy march in Hong Kong took third.


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 Post subject: Re: Is This the Death of Hong Kong?
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 7:42 pm 
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Wow...those pictures from Hong Kong are amazing. This could go badly.

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 Post subject: Re: Is This the Death of Hong Kong?
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 10:04 pm 
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A reader comment at the FP article is good:

Quote:
fenris 58 minutes ago
Commenting on these particular articles would be a lot more fun if anybody from China could read them.


Sad, but true.

For anyone in the west that is a China apologist they should read that comment and then sit in silence while they contemplate it's meaning.

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 Post subject: Re: Is This the Death of Hong Kong?
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2014 8:31 am 
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I have had a couple of students who were native Chinese. It was incredibly poignant to, in the course of delicately interviewing them about China, freedom and the future, to realize that even though they were intelligent, either through naivety, indoctrination or complicity, they could see no wrong in China.

There is a huge war brewing in China and this Hong Kong might just be the spark that gets the conflagration going. It might not, but eventually China is going to implode, else they are going to swing around to reforming at a fast enough pace that they do not implode, in which case, there will nonetheless be disorder and turmoil and something like a revolution in which the aristrocratic caste which has ruled for the last 80 years is purged and punished.

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 Post subject: Re: Is This the Death of Hong Kong?
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2014 9:12 am 
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You know, if they use low carbon footprint explosives, a war in china might be good for global warming,

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 Post subject: Re: Is This the Death of Hong Kong?
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2014 9:19 am 
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"I see no way the Chinese government can tolerate what is happening in HK. Greatly fear this will end badly," tweeted Mike Chinoy, a senior fellow at the U.S.-China Institute at the University of Southern California, who covered the Tiananmen crackdown for CNN.
"

Yep. This might be Tienanmen II with 20,000 cell phone videos The Chicoms should invite some Occupy Wall Street types. After 4-5 days of shitting all over the place and not bathing the Chinese students will go home in disgust.

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 Post subject: Re: Is This the Death of Hong Kong?
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2014 9:34 am 
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jack t ripper wrote:
"I see no way the Chinese government can tolerate what is happening in HK. Greatly fear this will end badly," tweeted Mike Chinoy, a senior fellow at the U.S.-China Institute at the University of Southern California, who covered the Tiananmen crackdown for CNN.
"

Yep. This might be Tienanmen II with 20,000 cell phone videos The Chicoms should invite some Occupy Wall Street types. After 4-5 days of shitting all over the place and not bathing the Chinese students will go home in disgust.


20,000 cell phone videos with few ways to get them out. The Chinese censors have been working OT on locking down social media/internet/etc.
They would come out eventually but if they cannot distribute them domestically/internationally then the Chinese government will have time to stamp out dissent before it can gain widespread traction.

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 Post subject: Re: Is This the Death of Hong Kong?
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2014 9:51 am 
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Lots of foreigners and native Chinese with foreign passports in Hong Kong. Hundreds of tall buildings. Lights all ovah prace

Also the CNN dude is standing right in the middle of the crowd. No way to keep it under wraps. Now, they might achieve a partial blackout on the mainland.

For CNN, this would be WAAAAY better than the Malaysian airliner.

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 Post subject: Re: Is This the Death of Hong Kong?
PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2014 9:54 am 
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chijohnaok wrote:
jack t ripper wrote:
"I see no way the Chinese government can tolerate what is happening in HK. Greatly fear this will end badly," tweeted Mike Chinoy, a senior fellow at the U.S.-China Institute at the University of Southern California, who covered the Tiananmen crackdown for CNN.
"

Yep. This might be Tienanmen II with 20,000 cell phone videos The Chicoms should invite some Occupy Wall Street types. After 4-5 days of shitting all over the place and not bathing the Chinese students will go home in disgust.


20,000 cell phone videos with few ways to get them out. The Chinese censors have been working OT on locking down social media/internet/etc.
They would come out eventually but if they cannot distribute them domestically/internationally then the Chinese government will have time to stamp out dissent before it can gain widespread traction.


Maybe, but I have my doubts about the integrity of the "Great Firewall." I tend to believe that there is at least some leakage, and that means that the pressure behind that leak is liable to rise even more rapidly.

Perhaps North Korea, where electricity is scarce, but in a nation with as much connectivity to the rest of the world as China, I have serious doubs that their efforts to censor will truly be effective and prevent enough people from developing suspicions.

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