maddogdrivethru.net

Open all night
It is currently Fri Sep 21, 2018 4:38 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 279 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ... 28  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2012 12:28 am 
Offline
buck private
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 8:01 am
Posts: 15789
Reputation points: 12603
Like to alternate between popular serious and lite reads. So after finishing the 'Civilization' book, then reading Max Brand, now it's 'Why the West Rules--for Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future'. Ian Morris (Author) 3.9 out of 5 stars , it's available in Kindle and Nook.

Ian Morris has a 1:41 video that summarizes the book here
Quote:
Dec 25, 2010 2:03 PM EST
America is still the richest and most powerful country on earth thanks to geography says historian Ian Morris, but if history is any guide then China will be next—and things could get violent.

The West is finding it harder to get its own way in the world.

The people of Europe and North America still produce two-thirds of the world’s GDP, spend more than two-thirds of its R&D dollars, and own almost all of its nuclear weapons and aircraft carriers. Yet this past year when President Obama—leader of the richest, most inventive, and best-armed country in history—visited Seoul he could not convince the leaders of the 19 next-biggest economies to follow his plans for global finance.

There is no shortage of theories about the shift in power from West to East, blaming everyone from incompetent politicians to currency manipulators. But the real explanation goes much deeper.

Winston Churchill famously said, “The farther backward you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.” He was right: To make sense of the forces that shape our world, we have to look deep into the past.

When we do this, the upheavals of our own day are revealed as merely the latest phase in a historical process that has been unfolding for thousands of years. The process is driven not by bungling bureaucrats or by sinister moneymen, but by the deepest force of all: geography.
(Continued)
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 ... -next.html
It fits in with 'The Rise and Fall of Great Empires' and 'Civilization: the West and the rest.' which were both good reads and IMHO complemented each other.

_________________
"Experience must be our only guide. Reason may mislead us."
John Dickinson
Constitutional Convention of 1787


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2012 7:58 pm 
Offline
buck private
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 8:01 am
Posts: 15789
Reputation points: 12603
Finished 'Why the West Rules -- For Now' (WtWR), good read, fits in with the previously read 'Civilization: the West and the Rest.' A good review is here http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/12/books ... wanted=all

Then read 'The Taming of Red Butte', a western but not about cowboys, rather, about railroading back in the early 1900's when the only alternative to rails was 'Shank's Mare', stage coach or pony ... ugh!

Besides I like riding railroads.

Pretty good read, here's a review: http://buddiesinthesaddle.blogspot.com/ ... butte.html

A word of warning, the review links to google books for a free download, I've had problems with Google only giving a sample of the book, so try Gutenberg http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/w

_________________
"Experience must be our only guide. Reason may mislead us."
John Dickinson
Constitutional Convention of 1787


Last edited by abradley on Sat Jun 23, 2012 8:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2012 8:15 pm 
Offline
buck private
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 8:01 am
Posts: 15789
Reputation points: 12603
Since the last post was about reading an 'over one hundred year old' book, figured this would fit:
Quote:
Sunday, June 10, 2012
Dated writing styles

Patti Abbott over at her blog is forever bringing up topics about books and movies that turn into brainteasers. They start as simple questions that can’t really be answered in a few words. Yesterday, she asked how much writing styles from 100 years ago have become dated and got a lot of interesting responses. Since I intended to blog about this subject some day anyway, now seems as good a time as any.

Reading early westerns from the turn of the last century, I have been amazed over and again by how readable I find them. I can think of only one book out of about 75 so far that I gave up on and didn’t finish. The problem wasn’t in the style but the simple-mindedness of the story. There wasn’t an ounce of depth or complexity.

In general, these writers were competent storytellers, and that is what keeps me turning pages. Often it’s impossible to tell whether the writing is 100 years old or brand new. Writers were aiming for a broad, popular audience that Owen Wister eventually scored with—not literary, not pulp, but “middle brow.” That audience hasn’t changed much.

Give-aways. However, there are some stylistic give-aways that reveal a writer is from another generation. First for me would be a lapse into Victorian sentimentality. A novel can go along for a hundred or more pages, and suddenly you find yourself knee-deep in gushy schmaltz. The subject is usually children or a woman getting put on a pedestal, especially if she is somebody’s mother.

Writers and readers seemed to have a high tolerance for portrayal of these as sweetly vulnerable and innocent. I cringe when a young child is introduced into a story because you can bet that they and the adults around them will communicate with each other in baby talk.

This habit is maybe part of a larger practice of turn-of-the-century writers—the frequent use of regional and ethnic dialects. Not only will an Irish character, for instance, speak in a broad accent, but he will be more than necessarily talkative. Reading early westerns, I’ve simply had to get used to this as an obsession of the time.

Writers are a) showing off their ear for accents, b) trying to reflect the “melting pot” of a country full of immigrants, c) stereotyping, e.g., the cowboy, or d) indicating a character’s social position, much as the Brits do in those period productions that get shown on PBS. I’d say, all four.

Obsolescence. You may think that the use of obsolete slang and regionalisms dates a writer’s style, but while I’ve gleaned hundreds of these for the “Old West glossaries” I post here at BITS, I don’t think that’s an issue. Normally you can tell the intended meaning from the context, like you do any unfamiliar word.

Topical references are a little more distracting. In a novel I recently read, a character was referred to as being more protective than the McKinley Bill. You’d need to know that the McKinley Bill imposed stiff tariffs on trade to understand the reference. But a cognitive psychologist would tell you that the brain outsorts meaningless information like this so efficiently that you don’t even have a memory later of having read it.

Could just be me, but I give characters and narrators liberty to use the language of the time they live in. It adds to the verisimilitude.

Where that breaks down a little for a modern reader, however, is the self-conscious avoidance of impolite language. A story might have characters who cuss and swear, but a writer could only make a roundabout reference to it—with a euphemism, a break in the dialogue along the lines of "He uttered an oath," or simply a blank for the reader to mentally fill in. It was the equivalent of bleeping, though so cleverly done sometimes, it's not all that intrusive.
Read more »
http://buddiesinthesaddle.blogspot.com/ ... .html#more

_________________
"Experience must be our only guide. Reason may mislead us."
John Dickinson
Constitutional Convention of 1787


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2012 10:13 pm 
Offline
Sergeant
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2011 5:31 pm
Posts: 1621
Location: The Bar
Reputation points: 3038
Currently reading "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich." It's about this country called Germany and these people who call themselves the Nasties and how they were bad.

_________________
The reason we have a Constitution is to protect us from a President like barack hussein obuma


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 8:15 am 
Offline
Hair in the soap
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:46 am
Posts: 19196
Reputation points: 18052
Mr. McGibbletts wrote:
Currently reading "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich." It's about this country called Germany and these people who call themselves the Nasties and how they were bad.


:lol:


I started reading that back in the 90s somewhere, but only got a short distance in. Just past the point about Hitler holding hands with his butt buddies in his beer hall days, and all the homo speculation.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 10:56 am 
Offline
Staff Sergeant
User avatar

Joined: Thu Sep 18, 2008 9:48 am
Posts: 3256
Location: up to my neck in it...
Reputation points: 6825
NefariousKoel wrote:
Mr. McGibbletts wrote:
Currently reading "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich." It's about this country called Germany and these people who call themselves the Nasties and how they were bad.


:lol:


I started reading that back in the 90s somewhere, but only got a short distance in. Just past the point about Hitler holding hands with his butt buddies in his beer hall days, and all the homo speculation.

:lol:

_________________
In the beginning the universe was created.
This has made a lot of people angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.
--Douglas Adams


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 3:01 pm 
Offline
buck private
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 8:01 am
Posts: 15789
Reputation points: 12603
NefariousKoel wrote:
{Snip}
I started reading that back in the 90s somewhere, but only got a short distance in. Just past the point about Hitler holding hands with his butt buddies in his beer hall days, and all the homo speculation.
Read it back in the '60s :o

_________________
"Experience must be our only guide. Reason may mislead us."
John Dickinson
Constitutional Convention of 1787


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 3:11 pm 
Offline
Sergeant

Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 6:48 pm
Posts: 2735
Reputation points: 8891
http://www.amazon.com/Kill-Switch-Neal- ... ill+switch

Haven't read a book in years. Just starting this. An old friend is one of the authors. Figured I'd give him a plug. He's working on the second one of the proposed trilogy right now.

No idea if it's any good but he was a Law & Order: SVU producer. Imagine this would be up that alley.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 10:27 pm 
Offline
Staff Sergeant

Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 4:26 pm
Posts: 3751
Location: not the end of the world but you can see it from here
Reputation points: 10085
Sampled it for the Kindle.

_________________
Texas, where we have the death penalty and aren't afraid to use it! Build the wall!!


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 9:49 pm 
Offline
Sergeant
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2011 5:31 pm
Posts: 1621
Location: The Bar
Reputation points: 3038
I forgot, I recently read Robinson Crusoe USN. It's the autobiographical story of a Navy Seaman who hid out on Guam from the Japanese capture of it till the US invasion with help from the locals. He was picked up right before the invasion because he remembered Semaphone flag signaling and after passing on intel to a destroyer, asked if they would pick him up. They sent a launch and did but were scared it was a Jap trick and made him strip and swim out to them.

The first Admiral he met promoted him to a chief then and there and he ate in the Officers mess and got some whiskey given to him by the doc for his "cough." I never knew about any of this. An okay light read.

_________________
The reason we have a Constitution is to protect us from a President like barack hussein obuma


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 279 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ... 28  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group