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 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 7:15 pm 
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Started to read "Salvo!"by Bernard Edwards. Utter tosh. Contentless. No real details. More like a windy, aspirating third party recapitulation of battles not described in detail. In discussing the Battle of Nov 12 (Guadalcanal) his analysis is utterly tomfoolish. His conclusion "Naive overconfidence in radar" is completely 180 degrees wrong. The problem was precisely that the USN commodore (Callaghan) put his command on the ship with the LEAST capable radar in the TF he commanded.

After reading about two battles and recognizing that not only do I know much more about the battles but also that he just got his facts wrong I stopped reading. Fortunately it was a freebie. Off to the recycling bin with it.

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 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 1:16 am 
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wulfir wrote:
Bergström used to focus on the air war and tends to give a lot of weight to air operations IMO.
I have his Barbarossa and Ardennes books (in Swedish) - large A4 size things. The Ardennes one is rich in details but also somewhat American critical. Bergström is for example example unimpressed by the advance of Patton's 4th Armored Division during the Bulge...

Bergström however gives a lot of praise for Cornelius Ryan's reserach on Market Garden, but thinks his book was rushed and more of a first draft sort of thing (as Ryan was ill and died shortly after it being published).

One thing Bergström claims is that all allied divisions on Sept 17 failed to advance on important objectives (bridges), and maybe especially the US 82nd Abn - where the commander Gavin is presented as overly cautious and responsible for making serious priority errors. This being because he opted to airland a full arty bn instead of his Glider infantry regiment and deploy most of his forces in defence of the Groosebeek Heights against non-existing Germans in the Reichswald (in the early stages of the operation).

I have a couple of books on Market Garden and they tend to present Gavin as a very able leader. Fished out Ryan's A Bridge Too Far to compare and the 82dn Abn:s role in the initial stages is presented in a much more positive light here ("...first time ever in history a full arty bn was airlanded!" etc)...
What was the complaint about Patton's 4th Army, IIRC Patton got high marks for his fast turn around, he did choose the wrong route thinking the Germans would be waiting for him on the other?

As for the airborne commanders, one American commander said (paraphrased): "It's going to take a lot of luck, but we've had a lot of luck so far." Maybe they were worried?

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 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 9:52 am 
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abradley wrote:
What was the complaint about Patton's 4th Army, IIRC Patton got high marks for his fast turn around, he did choose the wrong route thinking the Germans would be waiting for him on the other?


Not the 4th army (Patton commanded the 7th and later the 3rd Army) - it was in regards to the advance of the 4th Armored Division during the Bulge (one of Patton's divisions). I have that particular book up at the cabin, I'll give you the details when I get a chance to look into it some more...

abradley wrote:
As for the airborne commanders, one American commander said (paraphrased): "It's going to take a lot of luck, but we've had a lot of luck so far." Maybe they were worried?


Sort of. Bergström argues that they were unnecessarily worried given the weak German resistance and initial strength.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 12:39 pm 
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wulfir wrote:
abradley wrote:
What was the complaint about Patton's 4th Army, IIRC Patton got high marks for his fast turn around, he did choose the wrong route thinking the Germans would be waiting for him on the other?


Not the 4th army (Patton commanded the 7th and later the 3rd Army) - it was in regards to the advance of the 4th Armored Division during the Bulge (one of Patton's divisions). I have that particular book up at the cabin, I'll give you the details when I get a chance to look into it some more...

abradley wrote:
As for the airborne commanders, one American commander said (paraphrased): "It's going to take a lot of luck, but we've had a lot of luck so far." Maybe they were worried?


Sort of. Bergström argues that they were unnecessarily worried given the weak German resistance and initial strength.
OK, thanks for the info, I'll let you get back to enjoying the holidays.

Best

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 Post subject: Re: Reading
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 3:21 am 
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Quote:
The Winds of War
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Winds_of_War#Overview
Overview

The novel features a mixture of real and fictional characters that are all connected to the extended family of Victor "Pug" Henry, a fictional middle-aged Naval Officer and confidant of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The story arc begins six months before Germany's invasion of Poland in 1939 and ends shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor in late 1941, when the United States and, by extension, the Henry family, enters the war as well.

Wouk interspersed the narrative text with epistolic "excerpts" taken from a book written by one of the book's fictional characters, German general Armin von Roon, while he was in prison for war crimes. Victor Henry translates the volume in 1965 after coming across Von Roon's German version. While the texts provide the reader with a German outlook at the war, Henry occasionally inserts notes as counterpoint to some of von Roon's statements.
Read this long, long ago. Great stuff ... Wouk's works are always great.
Quote:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Winds ... miniseries)
The Winds of War is a 1983 miniseries, directed and produced by Dan Curtis, that follows the book of the same name written by Herman Wouk. Just as in the book, in addition to the lives of the Henry and Jastrow families, much time in the miniseries is devoted to the major global events of this period. Adolf Hitler and the German military staff, with the fictitious general Armin von Roon as a major character, is a prominent subplot of the miniseries. The Winds of War also includes segments of documentary footage, narrated by William Woodson, to explain major events and important characters.

It was followed by a sequel, War and Remembrance, in 1988, also based on a novel written by Wouk and also directed and produced by Curtis.[1]
You can find the mini series at

Perfect cast and adaption.

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