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 Post subject: UK teenager jailed for not disclosing password
PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 5:25 am 
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http://www.zdnet.com/blog/igeneration/u ... ag=nl.e550

[Many links within the linked article]

Quote:
UK teenager jailed for not disclosing password

By Zack Whittaker | October 6, 2010, 4:37am PDT

A UK teenager, under suspicion by police countering online child sexual abuse and exploitation, has been jailed for 16 weeks for not disclosing his password to investigators.

Police were unable to crack the password, thought to be of a 50 characters which even after the conviction they still cannot access.

Unlike the US which has seemingly combined a number of existing acts of law into one giant, consolidated act like the Patriot Act, the UK still has many acts which focus on various elements of crime and often overlap.

The 2004 Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIPA) Act is a broad ranging set of laws which authorise the interception of communications, surveillance either direct, covert or intrusive, and the access to data which broadly covers online activity by a broad range of UK public bodies and organisations. It’s one of the most powerful acts of law we have in the UK.

Part III(53) makes it an offence to hinder a criminal investigation by not disclosing a password to an encryption method, which may or may not uncover evidence to incriminate the subject. In effect, passwords in the eyes of the UK law are useless because if law enforcement want to see something but can’t, the law can be further used against you.

There are two arguments here. Forget the fact that this young man worked in a fast food restaurant; think about the wider picture.

Of course, if one does not disclose something it could be perceived that the subject has something to hide. That is a given, although as we all know, we all have a great deal to hide - even from the authorities. Even liberalised attitudes today can be personally contentious, such as sexuality, religion, salary or political attitudes. One could even argue the point, in most cases, the aforementioned are rarely a crux in a criminal trial and are often irrelevant or negated by forensics.

The other is privacy. As citizens to the respective country we live in, there are limits. Salaries are disclosed to the tax offices, political attitudes are expressed in the (albeit, secret) ballot box, and sexuality must be to a greater or lesser extent provided in certain medical areas such as giving blood.

But in terms of industry secrets and corporate affairs, one could easily argue that this is why encryption and the BlackBerry were even created: to keep secrets, well, secret.

Would you give up your password to the police, even if you knew you were innocent? Or would you stick to your guns and refuse, face a possible conviction but retain your ‘rights to privacy’? Leave a TalkBack.

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 Post subject: Re: UK teenager jailed for not disclosing password
PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 5:46 am 
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RIPA is a total farce anyway and should be repealed.

Quote:
In April 2008, it became known that council officials in Dorset put three children and their parents under surveillance, governed by RIPA, at home and in their daily movements to check whether they lived in a particular school catchment area.[5][6] Council officials spied on the family a total of 21 times.[7] This was in the context of rules which allow people who live in the school catchment area to enjoy advantages in obtaining a place at a popular school. The same council put fishermen under covert surveillance to check for the illegal harvesting of cockles and clams[8] in ways that are regulated by RIPA. Other councils in the UK have conducted undercover operations regulated by RIPA against dog fouling and fly-tipping.[3] According to the Daily Telegraph newspaper, local councils are conducting over a thousand RIPA-based covert surveillance operations every month for petty offences such as under-age smoking and breaches of planning regulations.[3] David Smith, deputy commissioner at the ICO (Information Commissioner's Office) has stated that he is concerned about the surveillance which has taken place in Poole.[9] In June 2008, the chairman of the Local Government Association, Sir Simon Milton, sent out a letter to the leaders of every council in England, urging local governments not to use the new powers granted by RIPA "for trivial matters", and suggested "reviewing these powers annually by an appropriate scrutiny committee".[10]

Especially contentious was Part III of the Act, which requires persons to supply decrypted information (which had been previously encrypted by the owner) and/or the cryptographic key to government representatives. Failure to disclose these items is a criminal offence, with a maximum penalty of two years in jail. Using the mechanism of secondary legislation, some parts of the Act required activation by a ministerial order before attaining legal force. Such orders have been made in respect of the relevant sections of Part I and Part II of the RIP Act and Part III. The latter became active in October 2007.[11] The first case where the powers were used was against animal rights activists in November 2007.[12] In August 2009 it was announced that two people had been prosecuted and convicted for refusing to provide British authorities with their encryption keys.[13] Later that year the first person convicted under RIPA legislation was sentenced to a term of 13 months imprisonment.[14]


Thank the Labournazis for yet another kick in the face of liberty.

The Tories/LibDems may kinda sorta repeal it, but question is whether Nick Clegg wants to change the voting system or repeal draconian laws as it looks like the Tories won't let him do both.

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 Post subject: Re: UK teenager jailed for not disclosing password
PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 2:46 pm 
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I would not cooperate in any manner at all concerning such a thing.

Bastards...."you have as much freedom as we deem we can trust you with....and we are not the trusting sort." :roll:


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 Post subject: Re: UK teenager jailed for not disclosing password
PostPosted: Mon Oct 11, 2010 7:06 am 
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buck private
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Not sure what I would do, if there was child porn on my machine ... most likely wouldn't, but since I ain't got none I'd likely give them the password.

Things like that don't bother me, am sure there are exploits that would pee me off. But checking people to see if their living in an area of a popular school or fishing, hunting, ect out of season seems natural.

Remember a discussion with a friend about a high crime housing complex where the city wanted to install cameras, he was upset, I wasn't.

Read an article about 'privacy' and the Constitution, basically it's not covered ... but it mentioned in old English law there was something prohibiting 'eavedropping' and since our law is mostly based on the English it's illegal http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eavesdropping

So according to the article outside the home there ain't no privacy, but in the home they must have a search warrant, if they've got a search warrant your obligated to open everything.

Makes sense to me.

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 Post subject: Re: UK teenager jailed for not disclosing password
PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2018 11:58 pm 
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Some people make it too easy for others to crack their passwords:

https://www.breitbart.com/national-secu ... -password/

Quote:
Report: Over a Quarter of Australian Officials Used ‘Password123’ as Government Password


You can read more about their stupidity at the above link

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- misattributed to Alexis De Tocqueville

No representations made as to the accuracy of info in posted news articles or links


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