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 Post subject: NHS Hit By Major Cyber-Attack
PostPosted: Fri May 12, 2017 2:29 pm 
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A major incident has been declared after NHS services across England and Scotland were hit by a cyber-attack.

The prime minister said the incident was part of a wider attack affecting organisations around the world.

Staff cannot access patient data, which has been scrambled by ransomware. There is no evidence patient data has been compromised, NHS Digital has said.

The BBC understands up to 25 NHS organisations and some GP practices have been affected.

Ambulances have been diverted and there has been disruption at some GP surgeries as a result of the attack.

NHS England said patients in an emergency should go to A&E or access emergency services as they normally would.

Dr Anne Rainsberry, NHS incident director, added: "More widely, we ask people to use the NHS wisely while we deal with this major incident, which is still ongoing."

NHS Digital said the ransomware attack was not "specifically targeted at the NHS" and was affecting other organisations.

A massive ransomware campaign appears to have attacked a number of organisations around the world.

Screenshots of a well known program that locks computers and demands a payment in Bitcoin have been shared online by those claiming to be affected.

The NHS in Wales and Northern Ireland has not been affected.

NHS Digital said the attack was believed to be carried out by the malware variant Wanna Decryptor.

"NHS Digital is working closely with the National Cyber Security Centre, the Department of Health and NHS England to support affected organisations and ensure patient safety is protected.

"Our focus is on supporting organisations to manage the incident swiftly and decisively, but we will continue to communicate with NHS colleagues and will share more information as it becomes available."

oftware that locks a computer and demands payment before allowing access again - ransomware - is one of the world's biggest growing cyber-threats.

It certainly looks like that is what has hit the NHS in this case - and one IT firm says 11 of its NHS customers have been affected.

Screenshots shared online purportedly from NHS staff, show a program demanding £230 ($300) in Bitcoin that looks similar to ransomware known as WannaCryptor or WCry.

There's no indication of who is behind the attack yet, nor do we know exactly how it infected NHS systems.

But hospitals have been targeted with similar software before - it struck three US hospitals last year.

Among those affected are:

Aintree
Blackpool, Lancashire - asked people not to attend A&E unless it was an emergency
Broomfield Hospital, Essex
Colchester General Hospital
Derbyshire - shut down all IT systems
Hertfordshire (East & North) - experiencing problems with computers and phone systems
James Paget (Great Yarmouth)
Lanarkshire - closed down its non-essential IT network and urged patients only to attend A&E in an emergency
Leicester
Lincoln
Lister, Stevenage - postponed all non-urgent activity and asking people not to come to A&E
Northwick Park (NW London)
Queens Hospital, Burton
Royal Berkshire - phone lines may have problems but patient care remains unaffected
Southport
St Bartholomew and Royal London
UHNM - Royal Stoke
Watford General

Dr Chris Mimnagh, who works at a medical centre in Liverpool that has been affected, said the attack had made their job impossible.

"Our entire patient record is accessed through the computer, blood results, history, medicines.

"Most of our prescribing is done electronically - we don't use the prescriptions unless the patient particularly chooses to want a piece of green paper.

"The rest of the time it's sent direct to the pharmacy and of course, all that is not able to be accessed when we lose the clinical system."

Dr Emma Fardon, a GP in Dundee, said she returned from house visits to find a message on the surgery's computers asking for the money.

"We can't access any patient records. Everything is fully computerised.

"We have no idea what drugs people are on or the allergies they have. We can't access the appointments system."

Dr Afzal Ashraf, an expert on cyber-security who has previously worked as an adviser to the government, told the BBC it was likely that the malware was spreading when NHS services shared documents and information.

But he also said he thought it was unlikely the attackers had deliberately targeted the NHS.

He added: "I think they probably attacked a small company assuming they would get a small amount of money but it's got into the NHS system and now they have the full power of the state against them - because obviously the government cannot afford for this sort of thing to happen and be successful."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-39899646


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Probably Russians.

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 Post subject: Re: NHS Hit By Major Cyber-Attack
PostPosted: Fri May 12, 2017 3:12 pm 
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Russian hacking, why? To learn the answer to that question you'll need to subscribe to Showtime . . .


Is ShowTime actually behind the Russian hacking? Which would mean CBS Corporation is behind Trump being the illegitimate World Emperor?? :shock:

. . . which means . . . all this supposed "friction" between Trump and "fake news" outlets . . . is just choreographed counter-agitprop psych warfare, all part of CBS-MSM-ShowTimes Ploy to sell cable-TV slots, ruin PewDiePie and promote white male patriarchy . . . :o


Notice: both Donald Trump, Vladdy "Hack Wan" Putin Kenobi, John Dickerson (the CBS reporter), AND Dan Aykroyd (the SNL member who originally came up with this gag) are all "White Guys" . . .

Mere coincidence? I think not . . .

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Last edited by Anthropoid on Fri May 12, 2017 3:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: NHS Hit By Major Cyber-Attack
PostPosted: Fri May 12, 2017 3:15 pm 
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Trump you racist Nazi . . .

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 Post subject: Re: NHS Hit By Major Cyber-Attack
PostPosted: Sat May 13, 2017 4:21 pm 
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Seems like the NHS attack was just part of a global one that got stopped when a security blogger accidentally found its kill switch...

Quote:
A UK security researcher has told the BBC how he "accidentally" halted the spread of the malicious ransomware that has affected hundreds of organisations, including the UK's NHS.

The 22-year-old man, known by the pseudonym MalwareTech, had taken a week off work, but decided to investigate the ransomware after hearing about the global cyber-attack.

He managed to bring the spread to a halt when he found what appeared to be a "kill switch" in the rogue software's code.

"It was actually partly accidental," he told the BBC, after spending the night investigating. "I have not slept a wink."

Although his discovery did not repair the damage done by the ransomware, it did stop it spreading to new computers, and he has been hailed an "accidental hero".

"I would say that's correct," he told the BBC.

"The attention has been slightly overwhelming. The boss gave me another week off to make up for this train-wreck of a vacation."

The researcher first noticed that the malware was trying to contact a specific web address every time it infected a new computer.

But the web address it was trying to contact - a long jumble of letters - had not been registered.

MalwareTech decided to register it, and bought it for $10.69 (£8). Owning it would let him see where computers were accessing it from, and give him an idea of how widespread the ransomware was.

By doing so, he unexpectedly triggered part of the ransomware's code that told it to stop spreading.

This type of code is known as a "kill switch", which some attackers use to halt the spread of their software if things get out of hand.

He tested his discovery and was delighted when he managed to trigger the ransomware on demand.

"Now you probably can't picture a grown man jumping around with the excitement of having just been 'ransomwared', but this was me," he said in a blog post.

MalwareTech now thinks the code was originally designed to thwart researchers trying to investigate the ransomware, but it backfired by letting them remotely disable it.

While the registration of the web address appears to have stopped one strain of the ransomware spreading from device-to-device, it does not repair computers that are already infected.

Security experts have also warned that new variants of the malware that ignore the "kill switch" will appear.

"This variant shouldn't be spreading any further, however there'll almost certainly be copycats," said security researcher Troy Hunt in a blog post.

MalwareTech warned: "We have stopped this one, but there will be another one coming and it will not be stoppable by us.

"There's a lot of money in this, there is no reason for them to stop. It's not much effort for them to change the code and start over."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-39907049

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 Post subject: Re: NHS Hit By Major Cyber-Attack
PostPosted: Sun May 14, 2017 9:50 am 
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Good on this young man figuring out how to stem the spread of this.

Why though did they have to publicly have to announce his solution?
Wouldn't they have been better served by simply saying it was stopped, and therefore leave the malware creator wondering what went wrong?

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 Post subject: Re: NHS Hit By Major Cyber-Attack
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 8:45 am 
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Well, because the IT security people needed to know how to turn off the "switch" on copies of the worm already infecting systems.

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 Post subject: Re: NHS Hit By Major Cyber-Attack
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 8:48 am 
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jack t ripper wrote:
Well, because the IT security people needed to know how to turn off the "switch" on copies of the worm already infecting systems.



Valid point.

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 Post subject: Re: NHS Hit By Major Cyber-Attack
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 8:57 am 
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So if I understand this correctly, this malware prevented your doctor (and you by extension) from being able to access/read you medical file. "Paper" files are no longer a thing; everything is logged into you medical file via computer.

Sucks if this happens as just about EVERYTHING (other than you [fallible] recollection of you medical history (including prescriptions)) would be inaccessible.

So aside from this malware, exactly how many backups are there/should there be to what is stored? For example, if the main memory storage for medical records should fail/be corrupted, is there one back up? Two backups?

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 Post subject: Re: NHS Hit By Major Cyber-Attack
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 9:46 am 
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jack t ripper wrote:
Well, because the IT security people needed to know how to turn off the "switch" on copies of the worm already infecting systems.


System Restore in Windows (and there are most definitely similar features in Windows version of a network with databases . . . active directory or whatever they call it).

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 Post subject: Re: NHS Hit By Major Cyber-Attack
PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 5:20 pm 
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It's much more sinister than simply destroying files. The damn thing subverts the entire electronic medical record system utilizing a previously unknown Microsoft system vulnerability that was apparently discovered by the NSA and THEY wrote the kernel that runs the thing.

How the thing works is the system administrator gets a message saying "pay $100,000 in bitcoin by tonight and we will turn on your system again" :D

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