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 Post subject: TB capital of Europe
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2017 6:19 am 
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-38844102

London is rife with tuberculosis again, apparently. After it was essentially eradicated.

I wonder where that came from, hmm? :roll:

Completely avoidable. This is what happens when braindead ideology trumps reality.

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 Post subject: Re: TB capital of Europe
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2017 9:23 am 
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Quote:
Johnny Islam, 29, is from Leyton in east London. Although having TB in the brain is rare, the disease itself is not.


Johnny Islam?

What...is that a real name???

Or did the BBC make a politically correct faux pas in an attempt to create an alias for this guy?

Quote:
There were 5,758 new cases of active TB in the UK, in 2015 - and almost 40% of those were in London.


That doesn't sound like alot, until you make this comparison:

Quote:
Preliminary TB statistics for the United States for 2015
The preliminary TB statistics for the United States for 2015 show a total of 9,563 TB cases reported in humans, compared with a total of 9,421 for 2014. Among the 9,563 TB cases reported, 3,201 (33.5%) occurred among U.S. born persons, corresponding to an annual TB incidence of 1.2 per 100,000 persons. The 6,335 TB cases among foreign born persons in the United States (66.2% of the total U.S. cases) corresponded to an annual incidence of 15.1 per 100,000 persons. Overall national TB incidence remained approximately 3.0 cases per 100,000 persons during 2013 – 2015.

http://www.tbfacts.org/tb-statistics-united-states/

UK population:
Population
• 2016 estimate
65,110,000[4] (22nd)
• 2011 census
63,181,775[5] (22nd)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom

US population:
Population
• 2017 estimate
324,473,000[8] (3rd)
• 2010 census
309,349,689[9] (3rd)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States

The US has roughly twice as many TB cases (in total number) than the UK does, but has roughly 5 times the population.

From the US blurb that I posted it stated that roughly 2/3 of all TB cases are foreign born. It wouldn't surprise me if a similar % of the UK's TB cases were also foreign born.

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 Post subject: Re: TB capital of Europe
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2017 9:33 am 
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With proper screening there'd be near as dammit 0 cases of TB in the UK, most likely.

There's just no excuse for this sort of thing. Brits will die as the direct result of political squeamishness, because having a dangerous infectious disease is apparently no reason to block someone's entry. Madness.

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 Post subject: Re: TB capital of Europe
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2017 10:57 am 
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Quite probably the US number is an undercount as we have trouble screening illegals.

To clarify, the numbers quoted must certainly be "active TB" as there would be many times that number of "latent TB" (positive skin test but negative CXR or symptoms).

Phillipines, Africa, Central America apparently have good TB growing weather.

We had two cases of Leprosy at a school near here recently. The secret code word is Hansen's Disease.

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 Post subject: Re: TB capital of Europe
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2017 11:17 am 
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Having lived in Botswana for a while, I test positive. Almost impossible to live in certain parts of the world and not contract it. It only causes symptoms when the immune system or metabolic system are otherwise compromised was my understanding, and moreover that it is prevalent in at least latent form if not manifest form in institutionalized populations in most societies.

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 Post subject: Re: TB capital of Europe
PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2017 12:43 pm 
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According to the wiki Tuberculosis in its "latent form" is not transmissible. Having lived among peasants in rural Botswana, drank goat and cow milk practically from the teet it was pretty much invevitable that I'd be exposed to it. Apparently the ungulate herds of Africa and possibly other populations are a major animal reservoir for the disease where it can be endemic but causes virtually no symptoms (a bit like how populations of foxes in Europe are the primary reservoir for rabies). I would imagine that quite a few of our returning service personnel from Afghanistan and Iraq have been exposed and test positive for the latent form after they return as well; though perhaps the risk for a soldier is lower than for an ethnographer! :)

Anyway . . . that wiki is saying that the latent form is not a transmission risk, though I seem to recall that, once one has contracted it, it may never "go away" (meaning one may always test positive and be at some risk for the infection to flare into symptomatic form, at which point the victim IS a transmission risk). I'm not sure though, and in truth, immunology and infectious disease are full of strange exceptions. I seem to recall one of my more recent physicians telling me there was no point in testing me any longer because it had been so long since exposure without symptoms (10+ years at that point) that my latent infection might be so diffuse as to be below the detection threshold for the measurement. Not sure if that is accurate or not.

All this to say: being a carrier of latent TB and being a repatriating national probably should never be grounds to be excluded from re-entry. Soldiers, anthropologists, journalists, film makers, documentarians, third-world groupies, trekkers, human rights NGOs, etc., etc., are all job roles where the chance of exposure from an overseas trip are non-trivial, with third-world groupies and anthropologists probably being at the highest risk (given both groups tendency to live in very close proximity to local populations). Nonetheless, it is worth noting that, should anyone with latent TB suffer some other ailment which compromised their generalized immune system or metabolic processes which allowed the latent TB to multiply, I believe any latent carrier is (at least for some period of time after initial exposure) a risk to become a transmitter of the disease; so people like me should be cognizant and responsible.

When it comes to foreign aliens seeking entrance, then there are two cases to consider: (a) individuals who are symptomatic with TB (and for that matter ANY disease) and who are not specifically seeking entrance for the limited purpose of paying to receive medical treatment (U.S. gets several thousand health migrants every year who come for cutting edge therapy for things like cancer and cardiovascular disease) should at best, have consideration of their entrance delayed until such time as they can be deemed to have clear health [I was subjected to this sort of scrutiny as a condition for being given a visa to live in Botswana and, apart from nations which have very close relationships with the U.S. like the U.K., I would expect that any stamp of more than 24 hours would similarly require a "clean bill of health"]; (b) foreign aliens who are latent for TB is a more difficult call, given that they could pose a risk to be symptomatic in future.

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 Post subject: Re: TB capital of Europe
PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2017 5:59 am 
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EUBanana wrote:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-38844102

London is rife with tuberculosis again, apparently. After it was essentially eradicated.

I wonder where that came from, hmm? :roll:

Completely avoidable. This is what happens when braindead ideology trumps reality.

Thanks to Brexit you lucky bastards don't have many russians in London. ;)

Why are rates of drug-resistant TB so high in Russia?

Though there was a problem with polonium few years back. :roll:


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